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Dr. Eversull To Conduct Tours 
Through Eastern United States 



Dr. LeRoi E. Eversull, assistant 
professor of geography and social 
studies, will conduct the Fourteen- 
th Annual United States Tour, 
sponsored by the Northwestern 
State College Department of Soc- 
ial Sciences. The tour features the 
Ohio River Valley, the Central At- 
lantic Coast, and the New York 
World's Fair. It will begin August 
2, and will end August 26. Travel 
will be by air-conditioned bus. 

Another tour sponsored by the 
same department will be the Se- 
cond Annual Overseas Tour to be 
conducted from August 7 through 
28. Dr. Yvonne Phillips, head of 
the department of social sciences, 
said a faculty member to conduct 
the tour will be announced about 
July 1. This tour features Western 
Europe and guaranteed departure, 
ture. 

These tours are open to all in- 
terested persons and applications 
are still being received. 

Three or six semester hours of 
undergraduate credit may be earn 
ed by participating in either of the 
tours. Three hours of graduate 
credit may be earned. The credit 
will be given in geography and 
social studies. 

The price of the U.S. Tour, ex- 
luding meals, is $320. A deposit of 
S50 is required. 

Prices for the European Tour 
are $847 and $994.20 with depar- 
ture from New York or New Or- 
leans, respectively. A deposit of 
$150 is required. 

Interested persons may obtain 
further information and reserva- 
tions by contacting the social 
science department. 



Reading Workshop In Progress 




urrent 



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auce 



Vol JLI No. 1 Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana Friday, June 19, 1964 



Spring Graduates Placed In State, 
Out-of-State Teaching Positions 



Freshmen Receive 
Piano Awards 

Three students were given 
piano scholarships to Northwest- 
ern State College during the first 
annual Piano Scholarship Competi- 
tion, held on campus May 30, ac- 
cording to Dr. Joseph B. Carlucci, 
head of the Music Department. 

Eligible for entry in the contest 
were high school seniors who plan- 
ned to enroll as piano majors dur- 
ing the fall or summer session, 
1964. 

Richard Smith of Bogue Chitto, 
Miss., was awarded the $250 scho- 
larship provided by Mrs. H.D. 
Dear, a prominent private piano 
tutor in Alexandria. 

Walter C. Pilcher of Alexandria 
was given the $100 scholarship 
donated by James Monroe. 

Winner of the $50 scholarship 
offered by the NSC music faculty 
is Coral Lynn Jacobs of Converse. 

Smith, Pilcher and Miss Jacobs 
are enrolled during the present 
summer session. 



Joe W. Webb, director of the 
placement at Northwestern State 
College, has released the names 
of students graduating last spring 
who have been placed in teaching 
positions through his office. 

Most of the graduates have ac- 
cepted jobs in Louisiana, but some 
will teach in Texas, California, 
Florida, and Massachusetts. 

Spring graduates placed through 
the Northwestern Placement Office 
and the parishes in which they 
will teach are. Mr. and Mrs Robert 
Wayne Bates, St. Mary; Bonnie Sue 
Beard, Houston, Texas.; Sue Carol 
Beasley, Houston; Don Bounds and 
Ann Rutherford, Caddo; Tanyau 
Bracey, Caddo; Mr. and Mrs. Lewis 
K. Broussard, St. Charles; Mr. and 
Mrs. George Howard Cameron, 
Calcasieu. 

Thomas Carroll Carson, East 
Baton Rouge; Ann Elizabeth Car- 
ter, Massachusetts; Gary Wayne 
Carter, St. Charles; Michael Clark, 
Bakersfield, Calif.; Nelwyn Cook, 
Houston; Mrs. Nancy Jones Dan- 
iel, Bossier; Samuel V. Duzat, Rap- 
ides; 

Maurice Dennis, Calcasieu; 
Mary Earline Doiron, Dallas, 
Tex.; Mrs. Rita M. Faith, Caddo; 
Albert F. Fredricks, Jr., Vermill- 
ion; Janet Fruge, Calcasieu; 
Charles Fulco, Caddo; Roy Gentry, 
Morehouse; John Gholson, Caddo; 
Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Grafton, 
Morehouse. 
Linda Hammond, Terrebonne; 



Language Study 
Offered Abroad 

American college students will 
be given the opportunity this fall 
to participate in a Michigan State 
University-sponsored program of 
language study abroad, in world- 
famous educational centers of Eu- 
rope. 

A 12-week intensive language 
program in French at Paris, Cap- 
d' Ail, Lausanne and Neuchatel; in 
German at Cologne; in Italian at 
Florence; and in Spanish at Barce- 
lona and Madrid will be offered. 

Applications for autumn, winter 
and spring term programs are now 
being accepted. Information and 
application forms can be obtained 
from AMLEC, 12 Kellogg Center, 
Michigan State University, East 
Lansing, Michigan. 

Participants will live with Eu- 
ropean students in private homes 
and will visit points of geographic 
or historical importance. 



Ed Hearron, Caddo; Elizabeth Hil- 
ton, Avoyelles; Kenneth Hood, 
Jefferson Davis; Thurmond James, 
Jefferson Davis; Sandra Dean 
Joyce, Caddo; Sammie Ketchum, 
Dallas; Linda Kramel, Rapides; 
Pauline Leadaman, Caddo; Juani- 
ta McGuire, private school; Bunnie 
Massingill, Caddo; Carol Miley, Ca- 
ddo; Charity Ann Monk, Allen; 
Jo Ann Monk, Rapides; Maureen 
Morrow, Dallas; O'Quinn Murphy, 
Florida; Mr. and Mrs. Steve Mur- 
phy, Calcasieu; John Nix and Sha- 
ron Shahan, St. Mary; Mr. and Mrs. 
Warren Taylor Price, East Felic- 
iana. 

Johnny Purvis, Caddo; Mr. and 
Mrs. Fred Ryland III, Calcasieu; 
John Sewell, Jefferson Davis; John 
Skinner, Caddo; Steve Slaughter, 
Beauregard; Becky Sloane, Calcas- 
ieu; Bill Stokes, Calcasieu; Judy 
Thomas, Caddo; Dale Tinsley, 
Morehouse;; 

Edward A. Vines, Houston; 
Rosemary Wasson, East Baton 
Rouge; Carolyn Whittington, Ca- 
ddo; Sharon Beth Williams, Caddo; 
Shirley Mae Willis, Allen; Myrtle 
Lee Thompson Willbanks, Caddo; 
Carolyn Faye Wright, Calcasieu; 
and George Zachary, Terrebonne. 

Spring graduates placed in other 
than teaching positions are Kathe- 
rine Anne Berry, CLECO, Pine- 
ville; Charles Hammond, Welex 
Corporation, John Sage Pan Geo 
Atlas Corporation; Virginia Lou 
Settle Scott, First Federal Savings 
and Loan, Natchitoches; Charles 
Ray Watts, Pittsburg Plate Glass, 
Lake Charles. 








™> *. v 



W. 0. Crain Heads 
Blue Key Group 

Blue Key members recently e- 
lected W. O. Crain Jr., as presi- 
dent of the national men's honor 
and leadership fraternity, for the 
next school year. 

Crain is a senior chemestry ma- 
jor. 

Other officers to head the group 
are Steve Blount, vice president; 
Joe Traigle, secretary-treasurer: 
James W. Phillips, corresponding 
secretary; Jimmy Berry, alumni 
secretary; Henry L. Mayfield, re- 
porter; and Roy H. Corley, histor- 
ian. 

Mayfield and Corley were just 
tapped to Blue Key at the end of 
the Spring semester, along with 
fifteen others. They are Jeffrey 
Austin, R. J. Charrier, Jon Gib- 
son, Gary A. Johnson, Julius Sher- 
man, Paul Jeansonne, Earl Mann- 
ing, Ray Robicheaux, Joe Salter, 
Larry Perdue, and John Lewis. 

New members were formally in- 
troduced at -the annual banquet 
of the Blue Key. Miss Joyce Daw 
Blue Key Darling during the past 
school year, was honored also. 



m 

Phillips Is Named 
New Line Coach 
For Demon Squad 

Aubrey C. (Red) Phillips, 34- 
year-old former Texas Tech star 
center, will be line coach of the 
Northwestern State College De- 
mon grid team this season. He has 
been serving as line coach and 
golf coach at USL and fills a va- 
cancy developing from the naming 
of longtime football assistant Wal- 
ter P. Ledet as manager of the Col- 
iseum. 

Working with offense and re- 
cruiting, the 6-3, 255-pound, for- 
mer pro has been at Southwestern 
since 1961. 

A winner of nine letters in 
football, basketball, and baseball 
at Paschal High School, the native 
of Abbott, Tex., lettered four 
years at Texas Tech as center and 
was team captain and All-Border 
Conference on offensive and de- 
fensive selections in 1951. In two 
of his three varsity years, the Red 
Raiders won the conference title 
and played in two bowl games. 

After playing a year as a pro 
with the Saskatchewan Rough Ri- 
ders in the Canadian Football Lea- 
gue, he returned to Texas where 
he began his coaching career at 
Wellington in 1953. He also coach- 
ed at Boca Ciega High School in 
St. Petersburg in that year and 
the next. He returned to Texas 
Tech for six years in 1955 and 
finally went to Southwestern in 
1961. 

Phillips is married to the for- 
mer Kathryn Murline Carlin. They 
have one daughter, Phyllis. 




WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP officers for the summer 
semester were elected recently. They are, (front row) left 
to right, Pat Porter and Ruth Shows, publicity chairmen, 
and (back row) Kay Jones, president; Carol Ann Skerratt, 
vice president; Mattie Shaw, secretary-treasurer; and De- 
Witt Lobrano, men's representative. (Sauce Photo by Di- 
ane Taylor) 



Barbara Martin 
To Head Group 

Barbara Martin, past-president 
of Associated Women Students, 
has been elected president of the 
Purple Jackets, honorary service 
women's organization at North- 
western State College. 

Other officers for the ensuing 
year include Carolyn Ann Bellue, 
vice president; Lucy Hart, secre- 
tary; and Joanne Salter, treasurer. 

New members in the organiza- 
tion include Sandra Ackerman, 
Sue Chance, Mary Ann Jones, Pat 
Latura, Virginia Ann Lewis, Mary 
Frances Lowe, Melinda Watkins, 
Bettye Lilly, Sandra Methvin, Sha- 
ron Napp, and Sally Stafford. 



'Communism 7 Not 
To Be Three Hours 

Dr. Yvonne Phillips, professor 
and head of the Department of 
Social Sciences, has announced that 
Social Studies 450 will not be of- 
fered as a three hour course dur- 
ing the fall semester, in opposi- 
tion to current rumors about the 
campus. 



Peace 



Corps 

Peace Corps internships will be 
offered by the national and four 
regional offices of Turn Toward 
Peace, a seminar covering pro- 
blems of international conflict this 
summer. 

Seminars begin in September and 
run through June. Internships be- 
gin in July, August, or Septem- 
ber. TTP is receiving applications 
now. Write for furthur informat- 
ion at Turn Toward Peace, Cooper 
Station Box 401, New York, NY. 
10003. 



Two-Day Conclave 
Is Main Feature 

By Max Duggan 
News Editor 

The Department of Education 
and Psychology of Northwestern 
State College is sponsoring a three- 
week workshop on "Modern App- 
roaches in Training Reading." The 
workshop, which began June 8 and 
will end June 26, features a two- 
day conference being held Thurs- 
day and Friday, according to Mil- 
dred H. Bailey, assistant professor 
of education and workshop direc- 
tor. 

When the workshop opened, 61 
elementary, junior and senior high 
school teachers had registered for 
it. Three hours graduate credit are 
earned by workshop participants. 

Dr. William D. Sheldon, Syracuse 
University, is the workshop con- 
sulant. He is senior author of the 
Sheldon Basic Readers and is for- 
mer president of the International 
Reading Association. 

Instructors for the workshop in- 
clude Mrs. Bailey; Dr. Leonard 
Fowler, associate professor of edu- 
cation and principal of NSC Ele- 
mentary School; Dr. Mary Jo Har- 
ris, assistant professor of educa- 
tion; and Dr. Lisso R. Simmons, 
professor of education. As a team, 
they teach timely topics in the 
teaching of reading and work in 
the Research Center Reading Labo- 
ratory. 

Modern Approach 

By observation and investigation, 
the participants delve into modern 
approaches in teaching reading 
such as Initial Teaching Alphabet 
Approach, Language Experience 
Approach, Programmed Approach, 
Linguistic Approach, and the Film 
Approach. 

Observation is done in demon- 
stration classes taught by Lora 
Butler, seventh grade, NSC Junior 
High; Helen Marie Cookston, third 
grade, NSC Elementary School; 
and Helen Graham, first grade, al- 
so of NSC Elementary. 

Mrs. Butler emphasizes the per- 
sonalized reading apporach at the 
beginning of the junior high level 
through use of many books with 
stress upon development of read- 
ing skills. 

Miss Cookston uses the outstand- 
ing features of the personalized 
reading approach while working 
with beginning fourth grade child- 
ren in ability groups. 

Mrs. Graham uses a variety of 
modern approaches to the teach- 
ing of reading at the first grade 
level such as the language exper- 
ience approach, the linguistic app- 
roach, and phonetics. 

Conference 

Thursday, participants and 
all interested persons began at- 
tending a conference held in con- 
junction with the workshop. 

Dr. Sheldon addressed confer- 
ence participants Thursday after- 
noon on "New Challenges in Amer- 
ican Reading Instruction." 

The conference will continue 
Friday with observation from 8 
a.m. to noon in grades one through 
seven in NSC Elementary School 
classrooms and a panel discussion 
led by Dr. Sheldon from 10 a.m. to 
noon. 

The conference will end with a 
lecture-demonstration by Dr. Shel- 
don scheduled from 1 to 3 p.m. in 
the Coliseum. Dr. Sheldon will 
demonstrate the teaching of read- 
ing in social studies with a group 
of fifth grade children. 

Books and materials have been 
placed on exhibition in the Coli- 
seum by the Louisiana Bookman's 
Association. The exhibit will be 
on display throughout the confer- 
ence. 



HOLIDAY NOTICE 

President John S. Keyser has 
announced that Northwestern 
State College will not hold classes 
Friday, July 3. This is in obser- 
vance of Independence Day which 
falls on a Saturday. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, JUNE 19, 1964 



Duke To Guide 
Assembly Tour 

Dale N. Duke, senior Spanish 
major from Baton Rouge, has been 
named as one of 35 select tour 
guides for a U.S. -sponsored World 
Assembly of Youth this summer. 

Duke will attend a four-day 
briefing session in New York City 
July 22, then go to a city in Mass- 
achusetts where he will meet col- 
lege students, young political lead- 
ers, and rural youth from foreign 
countries. He will conduct a tour 
for them of the Eastern United 
States and the New York World's 
Fair. The tour is expected to end 
in attendance of one of the national 
party conventions. 

Following graduation, Duke 



Cretin Assigned 
At Oak Ridge 

W.O. Crain, Jr., senior chemistry 
student at Northwestern State Col- 
lege, is in Oak Ridge National Lab- 
oratories, Oak Ridge, Tenn., for a 
ten-week summer trainee program 
of the Oak Ridge Institute of Nu- 
clear Studies. 

Crain, recently elected presi- 
dent of Blue Key, national men's 
leadership organization, was assig- 
ned to a project in the chemistry 
division. 

The program, which began June 
15, is designed for college students 
who have completed their junior 
year majoring in the sciences. 
Primarily for students from small 
Southern colleges, it is open to par- 
ticipants from all over the United 
States and encourages students in 
science and related fields to conti- 
nue education on the graduate 
level. 

Crain is a member of Phi Kappa 
Phi, national honorary scholastic 
fraternity, and Phi Eta Sigma, nat- 
ional honor men's fraternity. 



Natatorium Hours 

Natatorium hours for summer 
school are the same as during regu- 
lar semesters, announced Miss 
Joyce Hillard, assistant professor 
of health and physical education. 
Hours are 6-8 p.m. on week days, 
and 2-4 p.m. on weekends. 




THE FINEST, MOST 
SATISFYING MEALS 
ARE FOUND AT 

Le Rendezvous 

113 Second St. 



plans to teach Spanish at East 
Jefferson High School in Metarie. 

In addition to studies at NSC, 
he has studied Spanish at the 
University of Valencia in Spain. 



Judy Scroggs 
Is Miss Cenla 

Judith Kathleen Scroggs, fresh- 
man primary education major 
from Pineville, was recently named 
"Miss Cenla" in the annual pageant 
in Alexandria. 

Judy, a 19-year-old hazel-eyed 
blonde, is not enrolled during the 
present summer session, but at- 
tended school during the spring 
semester here. 

Nancy Clayton, NSC junior 
mathematics major from Natchi- 
toches, and member of the 1963 
Homecoming and State Fair 
Courts, was selected first runner- 
up in the Miss Cenla Pageant. 
Juanell Savage, sophomore English 
major from Glenmora, was another 
Northwestern contestant in the 
pageant. Both are attending sum- 
mer school. 

Judy will compete in the Miss 
Louisiana Pageant at Pontchar- 
train Beach in July. 

The contest is affiliated with the 
Miss USA-Miss Universe Pageants, 
to be held later in the summer at 
Miami Beach, Fla. 



TRACK 

Next season's recently appointed 
head track coach, Ernest Howell, 
has announced the signing of 
former Byrd star, Jim MaGee. The 
new cinderman will transfer from 
LSU. 

MaGee holds the 880-yard com- 
posite high school record of 1:55.3. 
He is also a fine quarter-miler. 

The new runner shows promise 
of breaking :48.0 in the quarter 
and 1:50.0 in the 880. 



WELCOME TO 
NSC 

Please Feel Free 
To Visit And 
Browse In 

Our Bookstore 
At Any Time 

— Featuring — 
NSC Sweatshirts 

ALL SIZES 

BAKER'S 
BOOK STORE 

Next To LeRendezvous 
'NSC's Favorite Bookstore' 



SANDEFUR JEWELERS 



Fine Selection 
of 

Engagement and 
Wedding Rings 




117 St. Denis St. 



Matching Funds 
Granted By NSF 

The Department of Biological 
Sciences at Northwestern State 
College has been awarded a match- 
ing funds grant by the National 
Science Foundation, according to 
Dr. W.G. Erwin, Department chair- 
man. 

Receipt of two other funds grants 
has been announced by the Depart- 
ment of Physical Science, making 
this the third to be received from 
the Foundation recently. 

Funds from the grant will be 
used to purchase items of special 
equipment for modern instruc- 
tion in biology and broadening the 
scope of instructional areas within 
the Department, according to Dr. 
Erwin. 

Drs. Earle A. Cross and George 
H. Ware, associate professors of 
zoology and botany, submitted the 
grant proposal totaling $10,620. 
Approximately one-third will be 
spent on equipment designed to 
implement a newly-revised curri- 
culum in wildlife management as 
well as in other areas of environ- 
mental biology. 

Another third will purchase 
specialized laboratory equipment 
for newly-developed areas of plant 
pathology and physiology. The re- 
maining funds will be spent for 
general equipment such as micro- 
scopes and models designed to im- 
prove undergraduate teaching 
throughout the Department. 



Summer Camp 

Lt. Col. Lee E. James has an- 
nounced that 16 men from North- 
western State College will partici- 
pate in the ROTC summer train- 
ing at Fort Sill, Okla. 

They are William C. Addison, 
John N. Bryan, Charles Canfield, 
Milbon J. Gaspond, Farleigh Gray, 
Jack Leggett, Earl Manning, Clin- 
ton, R. Marks, Samuel Masson, Rob- 
ert R. Port, Louis L. Prudhomme, 
Thomas W. Putnam, Ray T. Robi- 
cheaux, Sam Shelton, Thomas L. 
Stark and John Weffenstette. 

The six-week training course be- 
gins June 20 and ends July 31. 
Purpose of the summer camp is to 
give ROTC students a chance for 
practical application of the things 
they have learned in the classroom. 

They will be working with other 
ROTC members from the Fourth 
Army Area, which includes New 
Mexico, Arkansas, Texas and Louis- 
iana. The men will form ten com- 
panies, with no more than two men 
from this college in each company. 

Only those aspects common to 
all branches of military life will 
be taught. 



Two From NSC 
In Dallas Musicals 

Ron Alexander, senior vocal ma- 
jor, and Miss Lois Bartlett, instruc- 
tor of voice at Northwestern State 
College, have been selected to be 
members of the chorus for the ann- 
ual Dallas Summer Musicals, ac- 
cording to Dr. Joseph B. Carlucci, 
head of the Music Department. 

Alexander, a tenor, has appeared 
in operatic roles at NSC, and par- 
ticipated in recital and television 
programs during the past year in 
the Natchitoches and Shreveport 
areas. 

Miss Bartlett was asked to take 
one of the supporting roles in the 
company's first summer produc- 
tion. She is a soprano singer. 

She joined the Northwestern fac- 
ulty last February after complet- 
ing her Master of Music degree at 
the University of Texas, where she 
taught voice as a graduate assis- 
tant. She has appeared in Texas 
as an operatic singer and has 
placed in several vocal competi- 
tions. 



ED CARROLL'S CONOCO 

534 Second Street 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 

"There is a Difference" 



McCLUNG DRUG 



Welcomes Students and Faculty 
Of Northwestern State College 



WE ARE PROUD TO OFFER YOU 

Professional Prescription Service 
(We will gladly charge prescriptions to your parents if desired) 

Fast Free Delivery to Home or Dormitory 

Cashing of Personal or College Checks 
(Please bring ID card) 

Monthly Charge Accounts 



— plus — 

Cosmetics by Max Factor, Tussy, Coty, Revlon, Lanvin and others 
Stationery and school supplies 
Pipes and Tobacco 

Swim Caps and Swimming Equipment 
Magazines and Greeting Cards 

Excellent Selection of Educational Paperback Books 

McCLUNG DRUG COMPANY 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS SINCE 1891 
Front & Church Streets Phone 2461 



FRIDAY, JUNE 19, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



Teachers Need Pay Hike- 
Will Legislature Provide? 

The American high school teacher receives an average 
salary of $6400 per year. But, in parts of Louisiana, this is the 
maximum salary a teacher can receive with a master's degree 
and 15 years of experience. Former Northwestern State Col- 
lege students are teaching in such areas. Many others now 
studying education at NSC will be doing so in the future. 

Half the education graduates in Louisiana leave the state 
for higher paying teaching positions or do not teach at all. 
Northwestern graduates have been and will be forced to leave 
their home state in order to receive decent pay for professional 
work. 

Louisiana's governor and many of its legislators are in 
Baton Rouge because of promises to raise the state's educa- 
tional level by way of raising the teacher pay scale, thus, im- 
proving teaching staffs. Some are keeping their words. The 
governor and others procrastinate, asking for a more favorable 
time to ask the citizenry for a necessary tax increase. 

Threats to close the public schools if teachers do not get 
the raise have been made. These threats are interpreted by 
some as evidence of mercenary attitudes on the part of teach- 
ers which would postulate a lack of sincerity in their jobs and, 
hence, their unfitness to teach. 

But teachers are only human; and if they must use pres- 
sure in order to keep apace (or even some distance behind) the 
rising cost of living, they are not to be blamed. This would 
be quite another story if Louisiana were a poverty-stricken 
state with underpaid employees in all departments and no 
tangible means of raising itself to a higher position. But, as 
one of the richer states in the Union (our politicians tell us this 
at election time), its teachers deserve to be paid accordingly 
or at least better than at present. 

If Louisiana schools are closed this fall, whether for only 
a short time or longer, their teachers will be blamed and called 
disinterested followers of Mammon. But the real blame will 
lie with those who fail to deal fairly with them, whether citi- 
zens who vote down the necessary tax or officials who do not 
place the tax bill before them. 

— Max Duggan 



WELCOME STUDENTS 

For All Your 
Drug Needs, 
Shop 

Millspaugh's Drug Store 



590 Front St. 



Phone 2111 



SHOP BILL'S 

For All Your 
Summer Sportswear 



Open 
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Monday — Saturday 

BILL'S DOLLAR STORE 



768 Front St. 



Phone 9475 



OF ALL THINGS 

by Max Duggan 



I have known Protestants, Cath- 
olics, and Jews etc. ad infinitum 
and most of the rest and thought 
I had seen almost everything under 
the sun — everything, that is that 
could possibly be seen under the 
sun in America, yea, Louisiana. 
But I met a mystic. 

Yes, a real live mystic. And 



right in Prudhomme Hall at 
Northwestern State College! Here- 
tofore, I had taken him to be a 
nice quiet Latin descended Pres- 
byterian sophomore social science 
major from North Louisiana. 

But, lo and behold, what does he 
do upon his return at the beginning 
of the summer session but glide 
mysteriously into my room and 
lapse into an intriguing account 
of a mystical experience he had 
had between semesters! I was, to 
say the least, mystified. 

In his seance, he says, he and 
three other young Louisianians 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 




joined hands; and, upon extreme 
simultaneous concentration, they 
"conjured" up a spirit, as it may 
be called, from the netherworld. 
The spirit so conjured appeared to 
them, each at the same time and 
in identical environments, in the 
form of a woman (name withheld 
on request) ten years dead and 
formerly known by the mother of 
one of the media. Further exami- 
nation the following day disclosed 
the grave of a woman of the same 
name in a nearby cemetery. 

We have read of such things 
and seen them in movies; but, by 
George, this is the first time I have 
ever seen a real live one, — if, in- 
deed, he is alive. And this guy is 
serious. I just hope I do not find 
myself inhabiting a crystal ball for 
letting the cat out of the bag. But 
I thought you would like to know, 
especially you freshmen, that you 
are now associating with sophis- 
ticated mystics and ghouls. 

As far as I know, there is only 
one such entity on this campus, 
and I do not know whether he be- 
longs to a proselytizing sect or not. 
It might not be such a bad idea, 
then, to sleep with your light on 
and a silver bullet and a wooden 
stake under your pillow. 



urre 



nt S 



auce 



ESTABLISHED 1914 



ikcouk im an' vms oar a? -tfsruom union/ 



Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
scription $3 the year payable in advance. 



Member of the Associated Collegiate Press 



Summer Editor Diane Taylor 

News Editor Max Duggan 

Business Manager John W. Lewis 

Faculty Advisor E. W. Rice 

Editorial Staff: Robert Durr, Linda 
Weber, Gerald Anderson. 



Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not reflect 
the opinions of the student body or the 
administration and faculty of the college. 



The Current Sauce prints the news im- 
partiaUy. It supports what it believes to 
be right, and opposes what it believes to 
be wrong, regardless. 



Bulova Hamilton 
Elgin 

T. M. ALDREDGE JEWELER 

Speidel Watch Bands 



582 Front Street 



Natchitoches 



Doug's Steak House 

St. Denis Street 

Open From 5 a.m. till 11 p.m. 



« SPECIALIZE IN STEAKS 
• LUNCHES • SEAFOODS 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
SERVICES 
Old Lemee House 
Jefferson St. 
Every Sunday 11:00 A.M. 
All are welcome 



EVERYONE'S 



ON 

THE 

GO 




COMMUNITY 
CLEANERS 



Its Uhrbachs for all your picture needs. . . 
We specialize in portraits of college students. . . 
Formal & wedding portraits, candid wedding photography 
Pictures taken in black & white or LIVING COLOR. . . 
Come by the studio and see our samples. . . . 

Photography by UHRBACHS 

Phones 5556 and 5557 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, JUNE 19, 1964 





FACINGS SEWN DOWN ON THE MACHINE? "Easy," 
says Mrs. Louise M. Trammell, clothing construction spe- 
cialist and assistant education director for Halperns' 
Fabric, Inc. Mrs. Trammell directed a two-day session on 
the Bishop Method of clothing construction as a part of 
the Home Economics Workshop in progress this summer. 
Here she demonstrates the proper technique of sewing 
facings down on the machine. Her captive audience con- 
sists of home economics majors and other women stu- 
dents interested in sewing. 



Marriages 

GREGORY— FRIED 

Miss Jeanette Fried of Monroe 
and Hiram Ford Gregory, instruc- 
tor of geography and social studies 
at Northwestern State College, 
were married Saturday, May 30, in 
Our Lady of Fatima Catholic 
Church in Monroe. Mrs. Gregory 
received the B.S. degree in nursing 
at Northwestern in May, 1963. 



GIGLIO — MOORE 

St. John Berchman's Catholic 
Church in Shreveport was the scene 
of the June 6 wedding ceremony 
uniting Miss Sandra Moore of Lit- 
tle Rock, Ark., and Joseph F. Gig- 
lio of Shreveport. Mrs. Giglio is a 
former Tau Kappa Epsilon Sweet- 
heart, and the bridegroom, presi- 
dent of TKE during the 1963-64 
academic year, received the B.S. 
degree in business administrataion 
in May. 



SLACK— SNOW 

Miss Linda Kay Snow and Car- 
roll Eugene Slack, both of Cotton 
Valley, were married June 6 in the 
Cotton Valley Church of Christ. 
Mr. Slack received the B.S. degree 
in zoology in January, 1964. The 



NOTICE 

Murphy's 
Restaurant 

Now Open 
24 Hours A Day 
7 Days A Week 
1215 Washington 



Welcome 
New Students 

Regular Dinners 
Now Being Served 
At Night 

Broadmoor 
Restaurant 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 
Natchitoches, La. 



couple will reside in Houston, 
Texas. 



Andelson-Johnson 

Miss Bonny von Orange Johnson 
and Dr. Robert V. Andelson were 
wed in nuptial ceremonies Satur- 
day, June 7, in the Trinity Episco- 
pal Church, Natchitoches. Dr. An- 
delson, a native of Los Angeles, 
Calif., is assistant professor of 
government and philosophy at 
Northwestern State College. The 
bride recently taught high school 
in St. Paul, Minn. Her parents are 
Barney Johnson and the late Pearl 
von Orange Johnson of Tracey 
City, Tenn. 




FOR ALL DRUG AND 
COSMETIC NEEDS 
GO TO 

New Drug Store 

629 2nd St. Phone 2386 
Natchitoches, La. 



Student Nurses 
Assigned Work 
At Local Hospital 

Eleven upperclass student nurs- 
es at Northwestern State College 
have been assigned to clinical lab- 
oratory practice at the Natchito- 
ches Parish hospital for the cur- 
rent summer session. 

President John S. Kyser and 
Firal L. Ryder, administrator of 
the hospital, jointly announced 
that the sophomore and junior 
students, under the direction of 
Miss Mary Ellyn Chadwick, assist- 
ant professor of nursing, will per- 
form general nursing care activi- 
ties during afternoon hours, after 
pursuing regular morning classes 
on campus. 

Dr. Kyser said he is pleased with 
the arrangement, and he stressed 
the opportunity for student nurs- 
es to perform clinical laboratory 
practice, thus giving the Natchi- 
toches community a chance to 
know more about the program of 
the NSC School of Nursing. 

Miss Etta Anne Hincker, acting 
dean of the School of Nursing, 
pointed out that the hospital has 
been approved by the joint Com- 
mission on Accreditation of Hos- 
pitals and the medical and nursing 
staff have maintained an excellent 
reputation for medical and nursing 
care. This is said to be an excel- 
lent educational opportunity for 
the student nurses. 

They will perform the clinical 
laboratory practice as part of the 
advanced course in nursing, Nurs- 
ing 330 which is called "Compre- 
hensive Nursing," they are taking 
this summer. 

Although freshman nursing stu- 



DeBlieux's 
Pharmacy 

BROADMOOR 
Shopping Center 

FEATURING THE FINEST 
IN GIFTS AND COSMETICS 
• Revelon 

• Max Factor 

• Coty 

• Faberge' 

CANDIES 

• Pangburn 

• Hollingworth 

CARDS -All Occasion 
• Hallmark 
Call 4582 
For Fast Free Delivery 



TRESSIE'S 



HAIR STYLING AND SHAPING 




June Special 

Hot Oil Treatment 



FOR APPOINTMENTS PHONE 4536 AND VISIT 

Irma Courtney Jean Boucher 

Tressie Watts 
Elsie Simpson Linda Stanfield 

TRESSIE'S BEAUTY SALON 

Across from Warren's Grocery & Dairy Queen 



POTPOURRI 

The Potpourri staff has an- 
nounced that students may pick 
up their yearbooks in the Office 
of Student Relations on the first 
floor of Caldwell Hall. Graduates' 
yearbooks will be mailed to them 
and should be received sometime 
next week, according to John 
Weffenstette, editor-elect. Students 
not enrolled in summer school will 
pick up their annuals in the fall. 

dents have visited the local hospi- 
tal to observe, this is the first 
time upperclass students have been 
assigned to nursing care activi- 
ties there. 

Students enrolled in the summer 
clinical lab practice include Collin 
Brossett, Sharon Byrd, Sue Dear- 
mon, Mary Pat Dow, Carol Hebert, 
Peggy Hill, Carole Jorstad, Sandra 
Kelly, Madelyn Niemann, Myrna 
Spillman, and Pauline Van Mol. 



Art Exhibition 
Scheduled July 1 

The Annual Art Exhibition spon- 
sored by the Northwestern State 
College Art Department will be 
held July 1 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
in the Art Gallery of the Fine Arts 
Auditorium, according to Orville 
J. Hanchey, associate professor of 
art and department head. 

The Exhibition is open to the 
public free of admission. 



Refutation 

by John Gholson 
"Absence makes the heart grow 

fonder." 
So the poets say, 
"Out of sight, out of mind." 
Complete contradictory 

"The best is yet to come" 
Is often compromised, 
Yet in reverse some wish to say 
"The best years of our lives." 



Shoe Repairs of All Kinds 
Make Old Shoes Look Like New 




Orthopedic Corrections 
Western Style Belts & Wallets 
Tennis Shoes - Moccasins 
Polishes — Laces — Dyes 

GUNTER'S SHOE SERVICE , 

In A New Location 
BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 



"COCA-COLA" AMO •*©©«•* ARC HCOISTCRCO TRADE- M ARM 
WHICH lOtrttlK- ONLY TMI PRODUCT OR TM~COCA-eOU COMPANY, 




Singing goes better refreshed. 
«nd Coca-Cola — with that special zing 
but never too sweet — 
refreshes best. 



things gO 

better,! 

.-with 

Coke 




Bottled under the authority of The Coca-Cola Company by: 

NATCHITOCHES COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. 



FRIDAY, JUNE 19, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 5 




Spring Semester Honor Roll 
Is Issued By Academic Deans 



Billy Christmas 

Christmas Chosen 
Athletic Trainer 



Billy Eugene Christmas, Lake 
Charles physical therapist, will 
serve at Northwestern State Col- 
lege as athletic trainer of Demon 
teams, according to an announce- 
ment made by Jack Clayton, North- 
western athletic director, following 
the Athletic Council's approval 
and acceptance by Christmas. He 
will replace previously used stu- 
dent trainers. 

Christmas completed a program 



Students listed on the North- 
western State College spring se- 
mester honor roll, include the fol- 
lowing who maintained a "B" 
average, and earned no grade low- 
er than a "C". 

School of Applied Arts 
and Sciences 

Charlotte Airhart, Bonnie C. Al- 
len, Robert R. Arthur, James E. 
Aymond, Robert B. Bailey, Mal- 
colm Baker, Lamar Eugene Bates, 
S. Ann Benefield, Rita Bernard, 
Don J. Berthelot, Luther P. Ble- 
vins, Larry Dee Brady, James H. 
Braly, Jimmy L. Bradford, Thomas 



at the School of Physical Therapy 
at Charity Hospital in New Or- 
leans after receiving an under- 
graduate degree from Northwest- 
ern in 1955 and a master's degree 
the following year. 

After serving doctors in private 
practice in New Orleans until 
1959, he held a position in Special 
Education at Hamilton Junior High 
School in Houston. A resident of 
West Lake, he has been employed 
recently at St. Patrick's Hospital 
in Lake Charles. 

At Northwestern, Christmas 
managed the football, basketball 
and track teams and served as a 
student trainer in graduate school. 



OPENING SOON- 



WADDLE INN GRILL 



Waffles 

Steakburgers Seafood Plates 

Small Steaks (Grade A) 

Hash Brown French Fries 
With Each Order 



Milkshakes 



Sundaes 



Located on Highway 1 South 
Natchitoches, La. 



H. Brandon. 

Linda E. Brangato, Joy Nell 
Brewton, Velmer C. Brister, Mich- 
ael E. Brouillette, Jimmie L. 
Brown, Charles K.S. Chiu, B. Janet 
Clark, Truman G. Cooley, Richard 
C. Crain, Barry Dillard, Byron Dun- 
ham, Frank Echols, Ruth O. El- 
kine, George S. Felter, William B. 
Fincher, Kenneth Fisher. 

Ronnie L. Fletcher, Hulen Clif- 
ton Foshee, Lawrence Fuglaar, 
Frederick J. Gautreaux, Linda B. 
Gotcher, Benjamin C. Greene, June 
Harvill, Ronald E. Harrelson, Hoyt 
W. Harrington Jr., John T. Hearn, 
Larry L. Herrington, Frank S. Hin- 
es, David E. Hitt, Jack C. Hollens- 
head, Choran Wayne Hooper. 

Jeffie R. Ingram, Roy W. James 
Jr., Patsy Jeter, Thomas Keeth, 
Charles Kirsch, Monty Lenard, 
John Lewis, Douglas Lloyd, Gerald 
McCain, Fred C. McDowell, Wal- 
Kneely, Ralph McRae, Frederick 
Miller, Joseph F. Mowad Jr., And- 
rew Mulina. 

David Oxford, arol Ann Patten, 
William A. Pierce, Leslie Prud- 
homme, Donald L. Pyles, Martha 
Sue Ricks, Una Mary Roach, Hazel 
L. Russell, Linda Schmidt, Billy 
Scott, Denman Shaffer, James 
Sheppard, Raymond Shewmake, 
Clarence T. Shipp, Ronnie E. Shu- 



ler, Billie Ann Simmons, Jessie A. 
Sneed, Patsy Stewart, Gary Strat- 
ton. 

Marie Tassin, Griffin A. Taylor, 
Joseph N. Traigle, Marilyn Van- 
hoof, Wilbur F. Waldron Jr., Jerry 
C. Walsh, Tomasene Williamson, 
Archie J. Wilson, William L. Wood, 
Laurrel P. Worsham, Ronald W. 
Wyatt, John S. Boyd, Claire Lee 
(Butch) Chase, Robert F. Daven- 
port, Charles E. Hammond Jr., 
Jerry F. Hiers, Bobby J. Logan. 

Jerry V. McGraw, W. Randal 
Martin, Paul Rochette, Ronald D. 
Roy, Martha Ann Scott, George 
M. Shamblin, Ladislas Szabo. 

School Of Arts And Sciences 

Glenda Abney, Diana Aldrich, 
Sharon Andries, Priscilla Babin, 
Daniel Bailey, William Bailey, 
Joyce Barrett, Glenda Bates, Betty 
Beach, Joe Beasley, Roy Bell, Shel- 
ley Bennett, Richard Berlitz, Wil- 
liam Beyer, Kathleen Bishop, Eliz- 
abeth Blewer, Stanley Branton, 
Perry Brassell, Tommy Brewton, 
Carl Britt, Corolyn Broussard, 
Ellison Brown, Robert Brown, Wil- 
liam Bryan, Jerry Ann Bussey. 

Nancy Calaway, George Chand- 
ler, Barbara Chapman, J. O. Char- 
rier, Cecil Chopin, Carmen 
Codina, Lavell Cole, Fred Combs, 
Roy Corley, W.O. Crain, Gary 
Cunningham, Marcia Davis, Charles 
Domingues, Charles Fisher, Clyde 
(See Honor Roll, page 6) 




MAKE 

YOUR 

FAMILY 

AT HOME 
Away From Home. 




SHAMROCK MOTEL 



Highway 1 South 



Phone 5566 



'Slim' Howell 

Howell Appointed 
Head Track Coach 

Ernest (Slim) Howell, assistant 
football coach at Northwestern 
State College, has been appointed 
head coach of the Demon track 
team, according to NSC athletic 
director Jack Clayton. He is to re- 
place Coach Walter Ledet who 
will serve as Coliseum manager. 

Howell takes over the team next 
season. In the meantime he will 
remain on the grid staff as offen- 
sive line coach. 

A distance runner for the De- 
mons in 1947, he won the Gulf 
States Conference two-mile event. 
He also ran the mile and cross- 
country. 

He graduated from Northwest- 
ern in 1950 and earned a master's 
degree from the University of 
Arkansas. He joined the NSC staff 
in 1957 after having coached at 
Vinton and Franklin high schools 
in this state and at West Contra 
Junior College, Richmond, Calif. 



BODIES 



Shoes 



M iO W bW 6ft> bl U> 

ro -fa 7s& as Tfc a- a 

208 FRONT ST. 

NATCHITOCHES, LA. 



SEMI-ANNUAL 



SALE! 

On Mens Shoes 



Rand and Randcraff 

Dress Shoes 
Loafers 
Casuals 

Were 
$7.99 to $17.99 



Now 




$3.92 to $10.78 



HUNDREDS OF PAIRS TO CHOOSE FROM 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, JUNE 19, 1964 



Honor Roll— 

(Continued from page 5) 
Fisher, Gerald Flanagan, Daniel 
Fox, Vernon Fry. 

Charles Gallien, John Gaudin, 
Jon Gibson, Carol Givens, Linda 
Goodwin, Dinah Grisham, William 
Hagewood, Elizabeth Ham, Robert 
Hamilton, Donald Hanchey, Linda 
Hansford, Alfred Hathorn, Wal- 
lace Hebert, Jimmie Hilborn, Sha- 
ron Hillman, Jane Hodnett, Char- 
lotte Hood, Donald Horton, Mary 
Francis Huff, Mary Hutton, Denis 
Hyams. 

Katherine Inglis, Lelone James, 
Kathy James, Charley Johnson, 
Gary Johnson, Ronald Jones, Ed- 
win Kelly, Thomas Keys, Robert 
Kieffer, Carol Knotts, Kenneth 
Knotts, John Kothe, Claire Lam- 
perez, Walter Ledet, Edmond Lee, 
Rodney Lenard, Thellie Levee, Sam 
Lucero, Gobel Lynn. 

Earl Manning, Jerry Marks, 
Jerry Martin, Samuel Masson, Ed 
Mathiasen, Sid Matthews, Suzanne 
Maynard, Zackey Meachum, Jon 
Miller, Carol Moore, Sherry Moss, 
Mildred McFarlane, James Nance, 
Carolyn Napier, Guy Neson, Fred- 
dy Newman, Mary Ann Normand, 
Diana Osborn, Kay Owens, Susan 
Pace, William Perry, Meade 
Phelps, Julia Phillips, Geraldine 
Piatt. 

Ronald Powell, James L. Prud- 
homme, Thomas Putnam, Wanda 
Radford, Patrick Rambin, Paul 
Riggs, Ray Robicheaux, James Ros- 
hto, Virginia Rossi, Dana Sand- 
ers, Heinrich Shettler, Marilyn 
Scroggs, Larry Seabaugh, Deanna 
Semon, Cecilia Shea, Rahn Sher- 
man, John Sherman, John Sills, 
Herbert Smith, Jackie Speir, Mary 
Stewart, David Strother, Willis Ta- 
bor, James Talbert, Linda Thomp- 
son, Billy Toms, Eleanor Tylock. 

Patricia Unrath, Pat Vines, James 
White, Karl White, Billy White- 
head, L W. Woodard, John Wood- 
yard. 

School Of Education 

Sandra Ackerman, Morris Ald- 
redge, Jaye Lou Allen, Acey H. 
Ardoin, Elizabeth Arthur, Ben Ash, 
Thelda Baker, James Barr, Valda 
Barry, Jerry Bass, Mary Barton, 
Lamar Bates, Robert Bates, Bon- 
nie Sue Beard, Karen Bearden, 
Jeannie Behm, Carolyn Bellue, 
Karen Jean Bennett, Toni Bennett, 

Sharon Berlitz, Katherine Berry, 
Shirley Bigelow, Mary Blackmon, 
Georgia Blair, Earl Booker, Ra- 
mona Bott, Don Bounds, Tanyau 
Bracey, Dianna Braden, Jackie 
Brantley, Charlotte Breedlove, Sue 
Breedlove, Carolyn Brewer, Julia 
Broussard, Ben Brown, Jan Brown, 
Sarah Brown, Julia Bryan, Nina 
Burlile, Barbara Burns, Sandra 
Byrd. 

Anne Campbell, Carolyn Camp- 
bell, Ronald Canerday, Thomas 
Carson, Charles Carter, Clarissa 
Carter, Gary Carter, Willie Vern 
Carter, Carol Cathy, Thomas Cat- 



hey, Cheryl Chabaud, Julia Chance, 
Deirdre Chaney, Martha Choate, 
Mike Clark. 

Julie Clausen, Theresa Clemens, 
Nelda Click, Jimmie Cline, Janice 
Cloud, Robert Cloud, Gladys Coats, 
Wiley Cole, Nelwyn Cook, Carl 
Cooley, Patricia Cooper, Lynne 
Corbell, Sharon Corbell, Clarice 
Courville, Ellen Kay Cravath, Vir- 
ginia Crawford, Iris Creed, Carrie 
Crenshaw. 

Suzanne Crochet, Joan Cudd, 
Virginia Curtis. Nancy Daniel, 
Linda Daughtry, Jo Ann Dauzat, 
Sam Dauzat, Frank Davis, Bar- 
bara Dean, Margaret DeKeyzer, 
Maurice Dennis, Sharon Derbonne, 
Barbara Derrick, Mary DeSoto, 
Gloria Deville,, Betty Sue Dewitt, 
Earline Doiron. 

Mary Frances Dow, Barbara 
Dowden, Gwenda Sue Dowden, Tre- 
ba Gay Dozier, Bonnie Drudik, Ca- 
rol Ducote, Betty Duggan, Max 
Duggan, Dale Duke, Cheryl Du- 
rand, Clarence Durand, Glenda 
Durr, Eugene Eddlemon, Lynda 
Edwards, Larry Eddy, Carolyn Ev- 
erett. 

Ingrid Faber, Rita Faith, Dana 
Faroldo, Betty Faught, Fred Fea- 
zell, Carol Fenton, Eva Mary Fir- 
min, Brent Fleming, Marilyn Flem- 
ing, Geraldine Fontenot, Mary 
Ford, Sandra Foster, Yvonne Fra- 
zier, Janette Friday, Paul Fritz, 
Charles Fulco, Martha Gahagan, 
J. W. Galloway, Carolyn Gamble, 
Dorothea Gardner, Sue Ellen Gas- 
kin, Roy Gentry. 

Kathleen George, John Gholson, 
Gail Giles, Robert Gimbert, Sherry 
Gordon, Lola Ross Grafton Pat- 
ricia Graham, Mary Grantham, 
Nelda Anne Greene, Elizabeth 
Grigsby, Donnie Grissom, Martha 
Guay, Dorothey Gunter, Sherian 
Hadskey, Raymond Hale, Margaret 
Hall, Ronnie Hall, Clarence Hardy. 

Kenneth Hardy, Hayward (Son- 
ny) Hargrove, Linda Harper, 
Laurie Harris, Lucy Hart, Patricia 
Rogers Hauck, Mary Hayden, 
Sheryl Hays, Lottie Hayward, Ed 
Hearron, William Heckel, Eliza- 
beth Heitman, Maribeth Hender- 
son, Elizabeth Hilton. Barbara 
Hines, Margaret Hines. 

Dale Hodges, Virginia Hodges, 
Ruth-Anne Hoffstadt, Patsy, Hol- 
ley, Lucy Holston, Maudie Mae Hol- 



ston, Katherine Honeycutt, Mary 
Ann Horton, Nancy Humble, Car- 
olyn Ivy, Linda Jackson, Gary A. 
Johnson, Georgia Ann Johnson, 
James Robert Jones, Janice Jones, 
Kenneth Lynn Jones, Norma Jones, 
Robert L. Jones, Sandra Joyce. 

Erma K. Kasmiersky, Geraldine 
Kelly, Sammie Ketchum, Theresa 
Kisla, Kay Kitchens, Carolyn 
Klein, Sherry Kolb, Linda Kramel, 
Herman E. LaForge, Patricia La- 
tura, Pauline Leadaman, Suzanne 
Ledoux, Elizabeth Lee, Gail Lee, 
Larry Lee, John Leggett, Jack 
Leggett. 

Joette Lewis, Rita Lewis, Bettye 
Lilly, Janie Lindsey, Andrea Lisen- 
bea, Mary Francis Lowe, Diane 
McBride, William McBride, Char- 
lotte McCalla, Irby McCan, Pat- 
ricia McCook, Francis McDaniel, 
Sandra McDonald, Tony McDonald, 
Thomas McDowell, Kay McElwee, 
Joseph McFarland, Carroline Mc 
Gee, Mary Beth McGee, Jerry Mc 
Graw, Rebecca McKillips, Judith 
McLain, Sandra McMillan. 

Cecil McPhearson, Dottie Mc- 
Raie, Gene Maddox, Theresa Mah- 
fouz, Carolyn Malone, Lenora Man- 
ning, Jeannie Marler, Catherine 
Marshall, Barbara Martin, Bunny 
Masingill, Juanita Maxwell, Henry 
Mayfield, Vickey Ruth Meador, 
Sandra Methvin. 

Carol Jean Meyers, Carol Miley, 
William Miller, Rose Lyn Misu- 
raca, Patricia Mitchell, Charity 
Ann Monk, Jo Ann Monk, Barbara 
Morgan, Maureen Morrow, Janet 
Mott, Carole Mulina, Harry Mur- 
phy, Sharon Napp, Mary Lou Neal, 
Elizabeth Nethery, Cheryl Irene 
Neville, Chris Newsome, Delores 
Nichols, Carrie Nicklas, Milton 
Nix, Floyd J. Noel. 

Mary Norris, Sally O'Bryan, 
Brenda Odom, Carolyn Oglesby, 
Dale Oglesby, Melba Jean Ors- 
burn, Carolyn L. Ortego, Joe Pal- 
mer, Ann Parrott, Nettie E. Pat- 
ton, Carla Ruth Paul, Barbara N. 
Pearson, Catherine Pennington, 
Pamela F. Pepperman, Larry E. 
Perdue, Helen A. Petty. 

Deeann M. Pittman, James R. 

Prewitt, Francis S. Price, Janelle 
M. Price, Bernadine Provenza, Vio- 
la G. Pugh, Johnny Ray Purvis, 
F. Laura Pyle, Rebecca Raburn, 
Charlotte Ramsey, Cecil A. Rans- 
bottom, Richard S. Redditt, William 



M. Reid, Olivia Anne Rhodes, Sha- 
ri K. Richard, Judy L. Richardson. 

Ginger Ruth Risley, Edwena 
Roach, Marilyn Guidry Ritchie, 
Carney Robertson, Mary E. 
Robinson, Monty Rodes, Donna J. 
Rodgers, Rose Anna Roy, Geneva 
C. Russell, Marilyn Rutherford, 
William H. Rutledge, Ronald E. 
Ryan, Joe R. Salter, Raymond E. 
Sanders, Martha Kay Sandlin, 
Janet Rae Sauve, Juanell Savage, 
Glennie Scarborough, Lillian Schil- 
ling, Betty K. Scott, James E. Scri- 
ber, Donna C. Segari, Paul Sepul- 
vado, Martha R. Sers, Virginia 
Settle, John H. Sewell, Sandra J. 
Shahan, Neva M. Sharbono, Judy 
Sheffield, Lois P. Shelton, Jane 
W. Simpson, Shirley J. Simpson, 
John Amos Skinner, Patsy F. Skin- 
ner, John L. Slade, Becky A. Sloan. 

Dorothy A. Smith, Wanda C. 
Sparks, Marjorie Sprawls, James 
Sprayberry, Sally Ann Stafford, 
Peter Statelman, Elizabeth Step- 
hens, Ronnie R. Stevens, Gary T. 
Stewart, Mary E. Stinson, Carol F. 
Stone, Alberta A. Stroud, Wayne 
Summers, Mary Alice Taylor, San- 
dra F. Taylor, Jimmie K. Teague. 

Winnie Marie Tew, Judye Beth 
Thomas, John Thompson, Robert 
Tilley, Patricia G. Todd, Donald 
J. Toups, Linda M. Towson, Jennie 
Troesch, Mary Ellen Tyler, Vir- 
ginia G. Tyler, Edward A. Vines, 
Ramona Beth Vines, Carol Ann 
Wagley, Jean V. Walker, Wanda 
L. Walker, Barbara D. Wallace, 
Claudette Wallace. 

Judy L. Warner, Rae Belle War- 
ner, Rosemary Wasson, Kay Wat- 
kins, Melinda Watkins, Charles M. 
Webb, Randall J. Webb, Frances 
A. Wells, Harvey D. Werner, Ro- 
berta P. Wescott, Bobby R. West, 
Carolyn Whittington,. David B. 



Williams, Sharon B. Williams, Mel- 
ba R. Williamson. 

Celia Ann Willis, Dorothy A. 
Willis, Jimmy D. Willis, Shirley M. 
Willis, P. Ann Wilson, Patricia 
Windham, Richard Wolf, Brent S. 
Womack, June Wood, Connie 
Woodson, Carolyn F. Wright, Mar- 
garet Yarbrough, Glenda June 
Young, Judy Young. 

School Of Nursing 

Ginger Alessi, Karen Alford, 
Brenda Anderson, Maureen And- 
rews, Judie Baggett, Sherry Bam- 
ber, Faye Bankston, Glenda Bland, 
Dorothy Borland, Patricia Bough- 
ton, Lola Braley, Carol Buisson, 
Sharon Burkhalter, Ruby Carlile, 
Sandra Carter, Carol Chappell, Re- 
becca Crews, Mary Lou Davidson, 
Colleen Davis. 

Martha Dean, Mary Pat Dow, 
Sylvia Durham, Loree Geter Elkins, 
Martha Emmons, Carolyn Farring- 
ton, Marjorie Floyd, Kathy Gaddis, 
Rita Joyce Gallaspy, Karen Gotaas, 
Lucille Guillory, Barbara Haley, 
Sue Barton Hill, Jane Hill, Peggy 
Hill, Rosemary Hubbs, Barbara 
Humble, Louise Irwin, Shirley Je- 
ane. 

Frances Jordan, Katherine King, 
Linda Lattier, Wanda Kea Lee, 
Frances McElveen, Marie Medica, 
Joye Morgan, Sara Myles, Made- 
lyn Niemann, Cecile Phelps, Pat- 
ricia Porter, Carmen Prestridge, 
Cheryl Prevost, Lucille Pullam, Lil- 
lie Purvis, Arleen Rolling, Shirley 
Shaffer, Gloria Sisk, Mamel Shows. 

Betty Smith, Patricia L. Smith, 
Sylvia Smith, Patricia Thigpen, 
Mary Ann Touchstone, Linda Tou- 
sek, Nikki Towry, Jane Plummer 
Vaughan,Marilyn Sue Wales, San- 
dra Walker, Linda Wallace, Julia 
Wells, Hazel Williams, Jennifer 
Winn, Judy Young. 



Broadmoor Gift 
And Furniture 

A COMPLETE LINE OF GIFTS" 
Broadmoor Shopping Center 

Phone 5756 
NATCHITOCHES, LA. 



FABRIC CENTER 

BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 

Halpern's Assoc. 

— SUMMER SEWING — 
For school, vacation, or relaxation choose from our 
wonderful selection of summer fabrics — make a 
shirt, shorts, skirt, jumper shift, or skimmer. 

• SHOP OUR TABLE OF REDUCED FABRICS • 



Phone 4137 



9-5130 



CHIEF DRIVE-IN 



Thursday - Friday 



For The Latest In 
Summer Hair Styles 

CALL 

Lucy Barnes 

DELTA BEAUTY SALON 

108 Amulet Phone 2451 



Daisy Rachal 



Linnie Scott 




STUDENTS 

Let us pamper your 
parents when they come 
to visit you. 

For Room Reservations 
dial 6401 

'Wake-up Coffee and Papers' 



FOR FINE QUALITY 
DRY CLEANING AND 
LAUNDRY 




"THE WISTFUL WIDOW 
OF WAGON GAP" 

— plus — 

Tony Curtis 
THE 

"PERFECT FURLOUGH" 
color 



Saturday 



BEST FOR 
SHIRTS 



College Cleaners 

1 23 Jefferson St. 



'MYSTERY SUBMARINE' 
— plus — 

Alan Ladd 

"THE BIG LAND" 
color 



Sun - Mon - Tues 



Buddy Ebsen 

'MAIL ORDER BRIDE' 
color 



Wednesday Bucknite 



'LOOK IN ANY WINDOW' 

— plus — 

George Hamilton 
"ANGEL BABY" 



DON 

Theatre 



BOX OFFICE OPENS 
Mon - Fri — 2:45 
Sat Sun — 12:45 



Thursday - Friday 



pictures <y*sRa«|©roiSK)n» 



presents ^ 



■ — ~ V 



lO) jftini |jw 

" TM VI Ml 




IN VUUMY COt A ^ 



Saturday's Double Feature 



m 

TrtlT!f"0 

can rim 



HBffilWUW UKmmaflAliai THROUGH £C - » JNWRSAi RtlTJSf 




— plus 



M-G-Nlore""" 

J^THESLflVE 

.STEVE REEVES.. 



SPflRTfiCUStrcl 

ft TITftHUS MTOUCTKW V 
in C-reirriSeajn and tail irinCQt. 311 




Sunday - Wednesday 



'THE GREATEST FUN SHOW ' 



CAW k ISSKe.. 
OPERATION ] w 

wracks* Bmii-imb{ 





urrent 



s 



a u c e 



Vol. LI- 



-No^2- 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches La. Thurs., July 9, 1964 



NSC Faculty Members Retire 

Dean of Education at Northwestern State College for 10 
years, Dr. John A. Jones retired June 30, with plans to be ano- 
ther promoter of tourism in Natchitoches. Two other faculty 
members have retirement plans which will take them away 
from this city. 



DEAN JOHN A. JONES, Dean of Education for 10 years, 
retired June 30 with plans to continue his interest in the 
teacher education program, will continue his membership 
in professional organizations and plans to increase his 
activity in civic organizations. 



Board Approves 
$7 Million Funds 
For Northwestern 

The largest physical plant ex- 
pansion in the history of North- 
western received approval of the 
State Board of Education recently, 
and will involve the expenditure 
of more than seven million dollars 
for construction of four major 
buidings and payment of archi- 
tects fees. 

The Board approved the sale of 
$2 million of bonds to Emerson 
and Co. of San Antonio. Of this to- 
tal $1,550,000 will be used to build 
the new Student Union, and the 
balance for the payment of archi- 
tects for this and other projects. 
President Kyser has said that bids 
for the Student Union building 
should be received within the next 
60 days. 

The Board also approved pre- 
liminary plans for a 740-capacity 
women's dormitory, a 600-capacity 
men's residence, a dining hall to 
serve 2,000 persons, and an addi- 
tional six permanent married 
housing units costing $50,000. To- 
tal cost of these projects will be 
$7,100,000. 



Public Relations 

J. H. (Jake) Bosley, director of 
public relations for the Shreveport 
Journal, spoke on public relations 
in the daily newspaper profession, 
to a journalism class at North- 
western State College, Tuesday 
morning. A native of Montgomery, 
he has been connected with the 
Journal for over 35 years. 




Mrs. Frances Halm 



NSC Adds Four 
Faculty Members 

Four new members have been 
named at Northwestern State Col- 
lege, including one returning tea- 
cher. 

Mrs. Martha L. Lang returns as 
assistant professor of library 
science. 

Three were announced in Spec- 
ial Education: Thomas N. Jones, 
instructor of special education, who 
specializes in clinical psychology; 
Samuel D. Morrison, instructor of 
special education, who specializes 
in speech pathology; and Travis 
B. Randels, assistant professor of 
special education, a specialist in 
social work. 



Books Needed 
At Fort Polk 

Eberhard P. Deutsch, civilian 
aide for Louisiana to the Secretary 
of the Army, has written the Cur- 
rent Sauce, asking that we help in 
his campaign to get more books in 
the Fort Polk Library. 

The Army library, he says, des- 
perately needs additional books for 
the soldiers. Books of all levels are 
needed because some of the men 
are just learning to read and write, 
while others have received college 
degrees. 

Books may be left at any volun- 
teer or city fire station in Louis- 
iana, and Army officials will make 
arrangements to have them picked 
up. 



Mrs. Melba B. O'Quinn, faculty 
member here since 1925, will re- 
tire at the end of the summer ses- 
sion. She is associate professor of 
health and physical education, and 
was honored February 22 during 
"Melba O'Quinn Day" activities 
sponsored by the Physical Educa- 
tion Majors club. 

Mrs. Frances E. Halm, associate 
professor of home economics is 
also to retire at the end of the se- 
mester. She is a foods and nutri- 
tion instructor at Northwestern. 

Dean Jones 

A faculty member since 1943, 
Dean Jones has served as Dean 
since 1954. 

Dr. Jones became a first grade 
teacher in Grant Parish after at- 
tending Louisiana State Normal 
for one year, in 1917. He received 
the BA. degree from Louisiana 
Polytechnic Institute, and earned 



Guitar Ensemble, 
Opera, Al Hirt 
To Appear Here 



Peace Corps Test 

Peace Corps Placement Tests 
will be given Saturday, July 11, at 
8:30 a.m., in Peace Corps test cen- 
ters in these cities: Alexandria, 
Baton Rouge, Bogalousa, Lafay- 
ette, Lake Charles, Monroe, New 
Orleans, Ruston and Shreveport. 



220 Will Receive Degrees July 30 



Two hundred twenty students 
are candidates for degrees, includ- 
ing 77 for master's degrees, at ann- 
ual summer commencement exer- 
cises slated in the Northwestern 
State College Coliseum, Thursday, 
July 30. 

A candidate for the master of 
education degree with a major in 
educational administration and 
supervision, William C. Baker of 
Shreveport, will deliver the grad- 
uation speech. 

Baker is a graduate of Fair Park 
High School and earned his under- 
graduate degree at Centenary Col- 
lege after attending Northwestern. 
An eighth grade teacher at Youree 
Drive Junior High School in Sh- 
reveport, he was honored this year 
by selection as Educator of the 
Year in the junior high school di- 
vision, and was second runner-up 
in the selections of the Jaycees 
Young Teachers of the Year in 
Caddo Parish. 

He presides over the Caddo 
Teachers Assn., and served as a 
convention delegate to the LTA 
and NEA during 1963 and 1964, 
including participation in the NEA 
meeting in Seattle, Wash., last 
week. 

Baker is active in the program 
of the Department of Classroom 
Teachers at district, state, and na- 
tional levels, is a member of the 
Parent-Teacher Association, the 
North Louisiana Historical Asso- 
ciation, and is a charter member of 
Zeta Alpha chapter of Phi Delta 



Kappa honorary fraternity at Nor- 
thwestern. 

Candidates for degrees are list- 
ed below: 

Bachelor of Arts 

Suzanne Ledoux Anding, Janis Pearl 
Bass, Jerry Owen Bass, Sue Carol Beas- 
ley, Elizabeth Frey Blewer, Louis Ken- 
dall Broussard, Jimmie B. Cline, Willie 
V. Carter, Dolores Blake Cook, Iris Durr 
Greed. 

Barbara Dean, Eugene Eddlemon, Di- 
anne Weber Fisher, Marilyn Fleming, 
Charles Gallien, Robert Glmbert, La- 
Freda Dale Hodges, Lucille Holston, 
Therman James. 

Robert Jeter, Hattie Ruth Joplin, Eve- 
lyn Kellv, Bettv Lott, Rosalie Lott, Di- 
ane Charlene McBride, Patricia McCook, 
Frances McDaniel, Theresa Mahfouz, 
Kimble Marler, Catherine Marshall, Con- 
stance Mayes, Ruth Grice Melvin. 

Elizabeth C. Nethery. Charlotte Ram- 
sey, M. C. Reynolds, Mary NeU Slater 
Rhea, Shari Richard, Geneva Russell, 
Tommy Seabaugh, Donna Segari, Wayne 
Edward Summers. 

Diane Taylor, Marcia S. Whittington, 
Jimmv Deloach Willis, Joyce Faye Willis, 
Viola Pugh Willis, I. W. Woodard. 

Bachelor of Music 
in Education 

Leona Metcalfe, Nelwyn Dean Nors- 
worthy. 

Bachelor of Science 

Allen Anding, Sharon Janis Anthony, 
Elizabeth Stroud Arthur, Vincent Au- 
thement, Alden Bailey, William Dell 
Bailey, Lloyd F. Barkley Jr., George F. 
Barnes Jr., Kent Ray Bennett. 

Timothy Lee Berry, Earl Sandifer 
Booker, Jimmie Lee Brown, Frank W. 
Carroll, Barbara Chapman, Janet Tooke 
Clark, Clyde Cloud, James Keith Cole- 
man, Sandra Gayle Coiner, Gerald Glen 
Cooley, Billy R. Craft. 

Virginia Head Crawford, Robert Leon- 
ard Crone, Francis Gary Cunningham, 
Nancy Jones Daniel, Barry Dillard, John 
Michael Distefano, Clarence Durand, 
Howard Wayne Fanning, Hulen Clifton 
Foshee, Frederick Moffett Fraser. 

Tommy Steve Gay, Herbert Leslie 
Graham Jr., Laurie Hand Harris, Cody 




William C. Baker 

Wayne Hooper, James R. Johnson, Ar- 
thur Jones, Jerry L. Keen, Geraldine 
Brasher Kelly, Linda Kay Kitchens, Ri- 
chard Land, Alexandre R. Langlinais. 

Margie Ann LuttreU, Joseph Lavelle 
McCarty, Richard Michael McCormic, 
Robert McJimsey, Carole Ellen McKnee- 
ly, Malcolm Joseph McMullen, Melvin 
Frederick Martinez, Darrell Mayes, 
BUly Wade Moore. 

Carol Gipson Moore, Thomas Ralph 
Mitchell, Kathryn Neely, Eric R. Nelson, 
Dolores Lee Nichols, Helen Alannah 
Petty, Edward Randolph Price Jr., Vin- 
cent Protti, James Clarence Raley, Wil- 
liam Morris Reid, Martha Kay Sandlin. 

James Allen Shahan, John Michael 
Slay, Charles Donald Smith, Mary Susan 
Owen Smith, Walter Stephens, Sandra 
Frances Taylor, Louis T. Testa Jr., Ran- 
dall Tilley, Dale Murle Tinsley, William 
Lee Thomas, Donald James Toups. 

Dorothy Copeland Willis, Royce WUlis, 

(See Degrees, page 4) 



Al Hirt and his sextet have been 
scheduled to appear for a two- 
nour show at Northwestern State 
College during the up-coming con- 
cert season. Date of his appear- 
ance will be Monday, February 8, 
1965. 

Dr. Joseph B. Carlucci, chairman 
of the Northwestern-Natchitoches 
Concert Association and head of 
the NSC music department, has 
also announced two other famed 
groups to appear here, and said 
that at least one more attraction 
will be added. 

Puccini's opera "La Boheme," to 
be presented in English, will be 
featured by the Goldovsky Grand 
Opera Theatre of Boston, Tuesday, 
October 27. The company of 50, 
including soloists,, chorus and or- 
chestra, will present a fully stag- 
ed program with costumes and 
scenery. 

Monday, January 11 is the date 
set for the appearance of The Rom- 
ero's, guitar ensemble from Spain. 
Papa Celedonio Romero and his 
three sons, Celin, Pepe and Angel 
will play classical, romantic and 
flamenco guitar selections. 

Hirt famous, New Orleans jazz 
trumpeter, will perform in the 
5000-capacity Coliseum, which has 
an extraordinarily sensitive sound 
system. Association officials expect 
a capacity audience. 

The guitar group and opera com- 
pany will perform in the Fine 
Arts Auditorium. Students will be 
admitted with their ID cards. 

A season ticket drive is currently 
underway, and those interested 
should contact Dr. Carlucci or any 
of his association members, Miss 
Louise Lang, Mrs. Martha Lang, 
Frank Magers or Dr. Edna West. 



Discussion Class 
Planned In Fall 

Discussion, Speech 212, has been 
placed on the Northwestern State 
College tentative fall semester 
schedule, with Mrs. Edith Cote as 
instructor. 

Prerequisite to the course will 
be Speech 101. Discussion, to be 
offered for the general enrollment, 
will be a study of critical evalua- 
tion and the analysis and solution 
of controversial topics. 



his M.A. and Ph. D. degrees at 
Louisiana State University. 

Dr. Jones has expressed the be- 
lief that, eventually, the teacher 
education program may be extend- 
ed to five years, pointing out that 
in earlier years, teachers complet- 
ed the two-year program at Normal 
before the four-year degree pro- 
gram was instituted. Some schools 
have already installed the five- 
year programs. 

Elementary 

He came to the dean's office 
after many years in elementary 
education, and Dr. Jones has re- 
mained vitally concerned with the 
function of the elementary school. 

Dr. Jones has taught in Grant, 
Jackson, Claiborne and Richland 
Parishes and has served as princi- 
pal of elementary schools in 
Homer, Delhi, and at the demon- 
stration school on the Northwest- 
ern campus. He was named direc- 
tor of education at the Louisiana 
Training Institute at Monroe in 
1936 and was acting superinten- 
dent during the last 17 months of 
his four-year stay. 

An address by Dr. Jones before 
the 1952 meeting of the National 
Elementary Principals Assn. in 
New Orleans was included in a 
1954 book which gained national 
recognition. The book, "Teaching 
in the Elementary School, Read- 
ings," was later written by Lester 
and Alice Crow and Walter Mur- 
ray. 

In Retirement 

In retirement, his chief interests 
will be fishing and his rose gar- 
den. 

His wife, teacher at Northwest- 
ern Elementary School, will con- 
tinue to teach. During summer 
months, the couple plans to con- 
tinue traveling throughout the 
nation. 

Mrs. O'Quinn 

Mrs. O'Quinn, of New Roads, 
was graduated from Poydras High 
School, and earned her undergra- 
duate degree and her master's 
from Louisiana State University. 
She has done graduate work at 
Columbia University. 

Mrs. O'Quinn was honored by 
the Louisiana Association for 
Health, Physical Education, and 
Recreation for their contributions 
in this work throughout the years. 
The citation at that time read, in 
part, "her most significant contri- 
bution is perhaps found in the 
positive influence she has exer- 
cised on the students in her class- 
es over the years." 

Mrs. Halm 

Mrs. Francis Halm, long-time 
faculty member, will retire from 
the teaching profession at the end 
of the current summer session, 
according to Dr. Marie S. Dunn, 
department head. 

Mrs Halm joined the NSC staff 
in 1949. A native of Iowa, she re- 
ceived her education at Iowa State 
Teacher's College, University of 
Omaha (Nebraska), Teachers Col- 
lege at Columbia University in 
New York, and Iowa State Uni- 
versity. 

She has previously taught at the 
University of Omaha, College of 
St. Elizabeth (New Jersey) and 
Western Michigan University. 

Mrs. Halm has prepared mater- 
ial on Foods and Nutrition for a 
weekly news article and wrote the 
script for a nutrition program on 
two Omaha radio stations. 

She is active in numerous civic 
and professional organizations. 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1964 



GIBSON'S 

Discount Center 

"Where You Always Buy The Best For Less" 



224 Keyser Avenue 



Open 9 A.M. -8 P.M. Except On Sundays 



Phone 4168 




Costume Jewelry 



$1.00 Value 36c 
$2.00 Value 9] c 




82 ff # 1 



... f<* 



SPORTING GOODS 

Zebco Reel - No. 202 $5.95 value 

Gibson's Price $1.96 

Pik Pak Styrofoam Cooler No. 403 reg. $1.50 

Gibson's Price 



• WITH HANDLE 

• SELF INSULATED 



30 qt. Styrofoam Ice Chest 

• WITH HANDLE 



67c 

Gibson's Price 

$1.35 



School Supplies 

Filler Paper 300 Sheets 

IOV2 x 8 — 5 hole reg. 98c, Gibson's Price 



Typing Paper 100 Sheets 



47c 



8V2 X 1 1 



reg. 49c, Gibson's Price 37c 



New Papermate Profile Trio Ballpoint Pens 

SLIM, REGULAR, and HUSKY $1.57 
Reg. $1.97, Gibson's Price 



Hi Fi Records reg. $3.98 for 



$2.87 



Stereo Records reg. $4.98 for $3.67 



Popular Singers, Orchestras and Combos 



New Miss Clairol 
Hair Spray 

WON'T CHANGE HAIR COLOR 
14 oz. Size 
Reg. $1.50 



Get Set 
Hair Setting Lotion 

Reg. $1.50 now 97c 



Lustre Creme 
Shampoo 



4 oz. Tube 



$1.00 Value 



63c 



Tangee Dusting 

Powder 
^g $i oo w ; t h 

67c large 
Powder Puff 



Jackson's 



Ginger Snaps 



1% lb. bag 



reg. .49c 



Gibson's 
Price 



33c 



COPPERTONE 

Sun Tan 
Lotion or Oil 



• PLASTIC BOTTLE 

• 4fl. oz. 




$1.39 value 



87c 



THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



Lost Rings 

Anyone finding a Bunkie High 
School senior ring or a gold ring, 
please contact Elizabeth Chapman 
at 367. She reports that she left 
her rings in the women's room at 
the Coliseum on the night of the 
last movie down there. 



OPEN 

8 A.M. — 8 P.M. 
Monday — Friday 

8 A.M. — 5 P.M. 
Saturdays 

— ATTENTION — 
Fraternity & Sorority 
Members 
Stop by and 
see our new 
Fraternity & Sorority 
Sweatshirts 

BAKER'S 
BOOK STORE 

Next To LeRendezvous 
'NSC's Favorite Bookstore' 



CHIEF DRIVE-IN 



Thursday-Friday 



"RAMPAGE" 
Robert Mitchum 

— plus — 

Gary Cooper 
'THE HANGING TREE' 
Both in Color 



Saturday 



Fred MacMurray 
"AT GUN POINT" 
color 

— plus — 

Jeff Chandler 
'MERRILL'S MARAUDERS' 



Sun - Mon - Tues 



42 Great Stars in — 
"THE LONGEST DAY" 

Note: One complete per- 
formance only — Show 
starts 7:55 with the main 
feature starting at 8:15 



Wednesday Bucknite 



'LAW OF THE LAWLESS' 

— plus — 

'THUNDER IN THE SUN" 
Both in Color 

Note: Features show one 
time only starting at 7:55 



OF ALL THINGS 

by Max Duggan 



After the seeming success of 
last issue's OF ALL THINGS, why 
not go overboard and make it a 
full summer of mysticism? That 
little article uncovered some real 
ghouls! 

Several people, quite a few in- 
deed, approached me and asked 
me who the subject of my dis- 
course was. Of course, I was bound 
ethically not to tell them. That 
just goes to show you how many 
people wanted to be sure to aviod 
my mysterious medium. 

Others were not interested in 
the personal identity of this be- 
ing; but rather, they wanted to 
know if he was serious. To them 
and all other skeptics, let me has- 
ten to assure you that he was most 
definitely serious. In fact, this 
week he told me that he had had 
other mystical experiences since 
that one - - but these latter ones 
took place while under the influ- 
ence of blessed alcohol. 

Think not for a minute that 
these inquiries were forthcoming 
from any select group of unintel- 
lectual undergraduates or a few 
superstitious non-urbanites. An 
instructor on the Northwestern 
staff sent me two preventive mea- 
sure tips. He said to hang a pair 
of open scissors over my doorway 
to keep him out of the room. He 
also said warlocks like this one 
are terrified of crosses. Therefore, 
visitors, be prepared to enter a 
cross-shaped room. 

Well, I'll see you later if I don't 
saw you first. 



WATCH FOR SCOP 

Scop, a literary magazine of 
Northwestern State College stu- 
dent work, will appear in the 
Demon Handbook this fall. Scop is 
sponsored and prepared by mem- 
bers of the Northwestern Creative 
Writers' Club. 



CANE THEATRE 

Phone 2922 



Friday & Saturday 




Clark 
Gable 

Yvonne 
De Carlo 



. utnamiw SIDNEY POITIER — (Sj 

. WarnerColor t.o« Warner Brosn! 



KING-SIZE 
ACTION DRAMA I 

M-G-M fT'i ' . 



IN EASTMAN 

COLOR 



Sunday — Tuesday 




Wednesday 



GoDS 

LITTLE 



Science Units 
Receive Grant 

National Science Foundation re- 
cently awarded an Institutional 
Grant for Science in the sum of 
$11,790 to the departments of bio- 
logical • science, microbiology and 
physical sciences at Northwestern 
State College. 

The grant will be used for the 
purchase of equipment and ma- 
terials which will strengthen the 
abilities of these departments to 
support research and education in 
the sciences. 

Institutional grants are awarded 
to selected institutions and are in- 
tended to assist colleges and uni- 
versities in the development and 
maintenance of strong, well-bal- 
anced programs of research and 
education in the sciences, accord- 
ing to Dr. George A. Stokes, Dean 
of the School of Arts and Sciences. 



Consultant Will 
Attend Meeting 

Dr. Charles E. Palmer, speech 
and hearing consultant for the 
Special Education Center of North- 
western State College, will be one 
of 24 specialists in the nation at- 
tending a two-week institute on 
rehabilitation of laryngectomees at 
Columbia University in New York 
in August. 

Laryngectommes are persons 
whose voice boxes have been re- 
moved because of cancer. 

The institute is sponsored by the 
International Association of Lar- 
yngectommes and is endorsed by 
the American Cancer Society. It is 
supported by a grant from the Vo- 
cational Rehabilitation Administra- 
tion. 

Invitations to participants were 
based on their contributions to the 
program and potential service to 
the laryngectommes. 

Dr. Palmer has served as speech 
and hearing consultant at North- 
western for five years and is auth- 
or of two books in special educa- 
tion. 



DON 
Theatre 



BOX OFFICE OPENS 
Mon - Fri — 2:45 
Sat -Sun — 12:45 



HELD OVER 



! P ELVIS PRESLEY^! 
ift%ANN-MARGRET 

• {J^jSs* JACK OJMUI'^jS-GEORGE SIDNEY PROOUCIBN 4 



■:>jr PANAVISION"S rs/lETHOCOLOR : : . #-> 



Saturday's Double Feature 




Starts Sunday 



Tpny\ Christine 
Curtis \ Kaufinann 



*lCild iindlVonderfuV 



in Eastman 
COL OR | 

A HAROLD HECHT Production • A Universal Release 



MonsieurCognac *1 




SPECIAL EDUCATION staff members and students en- 
rolled in the NSC Summer Institute for Teachers of the 
Slow-learner, as well as students in two other special 
education classes have participated in field trips to Cen- 
tral Louisiana State Hospital and Pinecrest State School, 
both located in the Alexandra area. Shown above, left 
to right, are Hurst Hall, Mrs. Shirley Lucius and Douglas 
Howard, at the Central Hospital Medical Library. Howard 
is visiting instructor at Northwestern, from Syracuse Uni- 
versity. 



BSU Banquet 
Slated Tonight 

An informal banquet, using the 
theme "Down on the Farm," will 
be held in the Baptist Student 
Union center at 5:15 p.m. today, 
according to Miss Myra Gulledge, 
director. 

Featured speaker will be Dr. 
Udell Smith, State Baptist Student 
Director of the Louisiana Baptist 
Convention. 

Diane Sprawls, summer social 
chairman, was in charge of ban- 
quet arrangements. 

Those on the BSU Summer 
Council include Lynn Jones, presi- 
dent; James Bankston, Larry 
Leach, Pat Graves and Sandra 
Byrd, enlistment; Jessie McWilliam, 
business manager; Miss Sprawls; 
Roy Corley, devotion chairman; 
Pasty Holly, secretary; Louise Ir- 
win, publicity; Derval Stuckey, edi- 
tor; Joe Crooks and Sandra Cal- 
houn, student center host and hos- 



NSC GRIDIRON SCHEDULE 

All football games will be played 
on Saturdays, and the time of each 
is set at 8 p.m., except the Home- 
coming Day activities on Novem- 
ber 14. A star (*) denotes the 
games payed in Demon Stadium 
on campus. 

Sept. 19, Stephen F. Austin, Shreveport 
•Sept. 26, Louisiana CoUege 

Oct. 3, Northeast State, Monroe 
•Oct. 10, Abilene Christian CoUege 

Oct. 17, Ouachita Baptist, Arkadelphia, 
Arkansas. 

Oct. 24, Louisiana Tech, Shreveport 
Oct. 31, OPEN 

Nov. 7, McNeese State, Lake Charles 
•Nov. 14, Univ. of Southwestern La. 

(NSC Homecoming, 2 p.m.) 
•Nov. 21, Southeastern Louisiana College 



tess; Rosemary Hubbs, music; Mic- 
key Thompson, men's spiritual; 
Julia Bryan, women's spiritual; 
Olivia hodes, YWA president; Dr. 
Marie Dunn, faculty advisor; and 
the Rev. Edward Carnes, pastoral 
advisor. 



MAKE 

YOUR 

FAMILY 

AT HOME 
Away From Home. 



SHAMROCK MOTEL 



Highway 1 South 



Phone 5566 



From This Moment On. . . All Other 
Summer Shades Are Obsolete ! 



GOLDEN WONDER 

Lipstick by TUSSY 

Goes frosted with HOT ICE 
Summer's 1 cold but bold, icy but 
igniting new shades for lips. . . 

featuring 

CHAMPAGNE FROSTER 

(the new way to frost your regular shade) 

— Also, Special This Week — 

SPRAY Mist BOUTIQUE by Max Factor 
HYPNOTIQUE, PRIMITIF and GOLDEN WOODS Spray 
Colognes at the Special Price of $1.50 plus Fed. Tax. 



McCLUNG DRUG STORE 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS SINCE 1891 
Front & Church Sts. phone 2461 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1964 



Degrees- 



(Continued from page 1) 

Jerry Lynn Whitton, Ernest Scott Wood- 
ard Jr., Thomas Larry Woolley, Brent S. 
Womack, George W. Zachary Jr. 

Bachelor of Science 
in Nursing 

Maureen Anita Andrews, Dorothy Fay 
Borland, Catherine Bush, Mary Lou 
Davidson, Karen Gurie Gotaas, Jane Les- 
lie Hill, Ruby Hoyt, June Mott, Sara 
Myles, Catherine Short, Gloria Ann Sisk, 
Patricia Livingston Smith, Jessica Ann 
Tilton, Leah Williams, Jan Williams. 

Master of Arts 

William Samuel Couvillion, Cole Blease 
Graham Jr., Richard Ira Matthews. 

Master of Arts 
in Education 

Clothilde Wilder Adkins, Sandra Joan 
Bryan, Joan Bryant, Katherine Cherry, 
George Harold Clark, Mary Alice Cryer, 
Annie Gibson Easley, Elouise Fuller, 
Vance Lynne S. Jeanfreau, Nina Erline 
Jennings, Mrs. George Killen. 

Virginia Owens Kyzar, Clarice Long, 
Bobby Huey McDonald, Rose Darline 
McNeil, Dean Brown Mix, Dell Thomas 
Morgan, Margaret Burton Nolan, Ona 
Jolene Oswald, Dorothy Ann Pharis, Lois 
M. Elfert Thompson, Susanne Neal Tip- 
ton, Sidney Boyett Tomlinson, Dana Con- 
erly Waters. 

Master of Education 

William Calvin Baker, Preston Paul 
Blanchard, M. B. Childress, Ruth Lee 
Cooksey, William Craig, Clarence Owen 
Dodge, Sibyl Tatum Edwards, Philip 
Graves, Annie P. Hough, William Dale 
Hunter, Mozelle Smith Lasyone, Frances 
B. Newland, Ruby Porter. 

James Sanders, .Donald Stephenson, 
Thomas Ray Straugh'an, James Earl Sull- 
ivan, Leonard J. Truex, Mable Green 
Walker, Mary Lou Welch. 

Master of Music Education 

Harold Staton Flurry, Billy Ray Guin, 
David Leon Hardin. 

Master of Science 

Jerry Lee Allen, William Aaron Cain. 

Master of Science 
in Education 

Ernest Charles Atkins, Robert Doyle 
Brown, Beverly Gourdon Bruce, Danny 
Crump, Marlin Willard Deen, Barbara 
Frisk, James Haley, Guy Douglas Hark- 
ness, Julia Marion Honeycutt, Constance 
LaBarbera, Kenneth R. Lee, Janell Bry- 
ant Lemoine, Waple Lilley, Barbara 
McDaniel. 

John J. Marcinko, Elaine Porter Martin, 
Peggy Watson Martin, Dorothy O'Bryan, 
June E. Basham Plunket, Jacqueline 
Thurmon, James Hardage Simmons, Ro- 
bert Earl Turner, Frances Carmen Tyler, 
Mary Christine Walker, Donald Clayton 
Winn. 



Louisiana Librarian 
Writes Book Review 

The Spring 1964 issue of Louisi- 
ana History, the Journal of the 
Louisiana Historical Association 
carries a scholarly book review by 
Miss Katherine Bridges, Louisiana 
Librarian at Northwestern State 
College. The review is entitled 
"Documents Ineditos Para La His- 
toria de la Luisiana, 1792-1810." 



NOTICE 

Murphy's 
Restaurant 

Now Open 
24 Hours A Day 
7 Days A Week 
1215 Washington 



News Briefs 

Dr. Rene Bienvenu, head of the 
bacteriology department, will 
speak July 17, at the National 
Science Foundation-sponsored in- 
stitute for high school teachers on 
the University of Southwestern 
campus in Lafayette. Subject of 
his talk will be "A Natural Immune 
System to Brucellosis." (Betcha 
our bacteriology folks know more 
about the bug called brucella than 
any other school in the area.) 



Dr. Marie Dunn, head of the 
department of home economics, 
is in Baton Rouge along with Dr. 
Walter J. Robinson, head of the in- 
dustrial education department, 
and Dr. Raymond McCoy, associate 
professor of education ond psy- 
chology. They are attending the 
Louisiana Conference for Leaders 
of Vocational Education on the 
Louisiana State University campus. 
The conclave is sponsored by the 
state Department of Education. 



Dean Guy W. Nesom of the 
School of Education, has been 
named a member of the subcom- 
mittee to prepare uniform rules to 
be applied to payment of super- 
vising teachers. 



Summer enrollment at NSC to- 
tals 2,289 students, an increase of 



NSC Students Make Wedding Plans 



Burkhalter - Cobb 

Sharon Johnette Burkhalter of 
Baton Rouge and James Howard 
Cobb of Natchitoches, spring grad- 
uates of NSC, will wed in nuptial 
ceremonies at 4 p.m., Saturday, 
July 11, in the sanctuary of Istrou- 



SPECIAL EDITION 

Plenty of copies of the CUR- 
RENT SAUCE's Golden Jubilee 
Edition are available at the 
SAUCE office for those who 
would still like copies. 

The 20-page edition was is- 
sued May 1, by the 1963-64 
staff, edited by Robert Gentry. 
It features stories on North- 
western State College and 
events since the beginning of 
Louisiana State Normal School 
established by Legislative Act 
51 in 1884. 

The SAUCE office is located 
in Bullard Hall, south of, and 
adjacent to, the power plant. 



176 over last year. This is the lar- 
gest summer registration in the 
80-year history of the college. Gra- 
duate students number 473, an in- 
crease of 15 per cent over last 
summer's enrollment. Women 
number 1,348 and men students 
number 941. 



For The Latest In 
Summer Hair Styles 

CALL 

Daisy Rachal Linnie Scott 

Lucy Barnes 

DELTA BEAUTY SALON 

108 Amulet Phone 2451 



SHOP BILL'S 

For All Your 
Summer Sportswear 



Open 
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Monday — Saturday 



BILL'S DOLLAR STORE 



768 Front St. 



Phone 9475 



ma Baptist Church in Baton Rouge. 
The couple will reside in Green- 
ville, Miss. 



Sanders - Sewell 

Kings Highway Christian Church 
in Shreveport will be the scene of 
the Sunday, August 2 wedding 
uniting in marriage Sarah Eliza- 
beth Sanders of Shreveport and 
John Howard Sewell of Morgan 
City. Mr. Sewell was graduated 
from NSC in May and is enrolled 
in the graduate school this sum- 
mer. Miss Sanders is also enrolled 
in summer school. The couple will 
reside in Elton, where the bride- 
groom will teach and coach, and 
the bride will enroll in McNeese 
State Colege in Lake Chares. 



Bott Reynolds 

Romona Ann Bott and Gordon 
Lewis Reynolds, both of Shreve- 



Weffenstette Is 
Honored At SIU 

Walter Weffenstette, assistant 
professor of industrial education 
at Northwestern State College, who 
has returned from a semester's 
leave during which he worked to- 
ward earning his doctorate, was 
recently named to membership in 
Phi Kappa Phi honor society at 
Southern Illinois University. 

SIU is located in Carbondale, 
111. 



port, will marry in Saturday, Au- 
gust 22 wedding rites at Our Lady 
of the Holy Rosary Catholic 
Church. Miss Bott is a junior and 
her fiance is a senior at North- 
western. His fraternity is Kappa 
Alpha. Following their marriage, 
the couple will live in Vets Town 
on campus and continue their edu- 
cation. 




STUDENTS 

Let us pamper your 
parents when they come 
to visit you. 

For Room Reservations 
dial 6401 

'Wake-up Coffee and Papers' 



Doug's Steak House 

St. Denis Street 

Open From 5 a.m. till 11 p.m. 

« SPECIALIZE IN STEAKS 



• LUNCHES 



• SEAFOODS 



Its Uhrbachs for all your picture needs. . . 
We specialize in portraits of college students. . . 
Formal & wedding portraits, candid wedding photography 
Pictures taken in black & white or LIVING COLOR. . . 
Come by the studio and see our samples. . . . 

Photography by UHRBACHS 

Phones 5556 and 5557 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 




FAIR 




Spray Cologne 

fragrantly refreshing, 
charmingly gift boxed, 
these gay new 
summer coolers 
make a very special 
summer-only appearance 
at a very special price 
2 oz. 2.00 
choose your favorite 
fashion fragrance: 
Aphrodisia Woodhue 
Tigress Flambeau 




P&C REXALL DRUG 



Phone 2355 — 116 Touline St.— Natchitoches 



j 




urrent 



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auce 



VOL. LI— No. 3 Northwestern State College, Natchitoches La. Friday, Sept. 25, 1964 



President's Message 




To our students: 

It is always a privilege to 
extend warm greetings to 
those who enroll at North- 
western State College. This 
feeling is at a peak this fall. 

The reasons for this great 
good feeling range from just 
old-fashioned pleasure in as- 
sociating with young people 
to a serious awareness of the 
desire to do something to help 
meet the great challenges of 
our time. 

On behalf of all those who 
serve our fine student body, 
I say: WE ARE GLAD YOU 
ARE HERE. 

Sincerely, 

John S. Kyser 

President 



war 



Mambourg Accepted Into American 
Academy Of Dramatic Arts In N.Y. 

James Mambourg, Jr., son of James Mambourg, Sr. 9 Lake 
Forest Hills, Shreveport, will leave for New York early in 
October to enroll in the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. 

Mambourg, who has attended 



Northwestern State College for the 
past three years, is a drama ma- 
jor. At the Academy, which is af- 
filiated with New York Univer- 
sity, he will enroll in a two year 
junior course, consisting of tech- 
niques and fundamentals of theat- 
er production. 

Admission to the senior course 
is selective, and based upon the 
successful completion of the pre- 
vious course. Since the Academy 
is connected with NYU, its stu- 
dents may obtain bachelor of 
speech and drama degrees from 
the university. 

Mambourg is a member of the 
Southwest Theater Conference and 
the American National Theater 
Association. He has appeared in 
the Shreveport Little Theater pro- 
ductions, "The Gang's All Here", 
"The Golden Fleecing", Third 
Best Sport," and the NSC produc- 
tions of "Teahouse of the August 
Moon", "Taming of the Shrew" 
(both presented at Hodges Gar- 
dens) and "Pride and Prejudice." 

John Wray and Margaret Mary 
Young, director and designer re- 
spectivey of the Shreveport Little 



Freshman Officer's 
Duties Outlined 

By Mary Ellen Davis 
"Sauce" Staff Writer 

The election of Freshman offi- 
cers for 1964-65 at Northwestern 
State College will be held Tuesday 
in the Student Center. Being the 
largest Freshman class in years 
presents a great challenge to those 
able to recognize and accept the 
demands of a Freshman class offi- 
cer. 

It is the duty of the class presi- 
dent to accept direct responsibilty 
for his class. He must appoint any 
needed committees and preside at 
all class meetings. The duty of the 
vice-president is to preside when 
the president is absent and to 
serve as chairman of all social 
committees. 

The class secretary-treasurer 
must keep the minutes of each 
class meeting and estimate the 
total cost of all proposed class act- 
ivities. Freshman representatives 
of men and women serve as a 
voice for the freshmen students 
of Northwestern at the student 
council meetings. 

When voting, bear in mind the 
qualifications of the candidate and 
demands of being a class officer. 
It is your awareness of these qual- 
ities that will put the most quali- 
fied people in office. 



Theater assisted Mambour in his 
application to the Academy. 

Althoug Mambourg was request- 
ed by Bryan Morgan, director of 
Admissions for the Academy not 
to list the names of prominent 
treatrical personalities serving on 
the auditions board, he said sev- 
eral "really big names" were a- 
mong them. 

Among the many famous alumni 
of the Academy, founded in 1884 
and now directed by Francis Ful- 
ler, are Grace Kelly — now Prin- 
cess Grace of Monaco, Rosalind 
Russel, Spencer Tracy, and Kirk 
Douglas. 



Maid Of Cotton 
Contest Opens 

The National Cotton Council has 
announced the opening of its 
search for the 1965 Maid of Cotton 
who will succeed Alabama's Katy 
Sue Meredith as fashion and good- 
will ambassadress for the Ameri- 
can cotton industry. 

Applications must be made be- 
fore midnight, November 30. Of- 
ficial blanks may be obtained from 
the National Cotton Council, 1918 
North Parkway, Memphis, Tennes- 
see. The winner will be selected in 
Memphis on December 29. 

The contest is open to single girls 
between the ages of 19 and 25 
who are at least five feet and one- 
half inches tall. All applicants 
must have been born in a cotton 
producing state. 

An international tour and a 
wardrobe of high fashion cottons 
await the new Maid. The contest 
is sponsored by the Council, the 
Memphis Cotton Carnival Associa- 
tion, and Cotton Exchanges of 
Memphis and New York. 



Sophomore Nursing 
Students Oriented 

Thirty-seven Northwestern State 
College sophomore nursing stud- 
ents arrived in Shreveport on Sept- 
ember 13, and were initiated into 
clinical nursing during a week of 
formal orientation. 

Each new student was guided 
by a "big sister" through the first 
few trying days. The week of or- 
ientation was climaxed by a party 
during which the junior class pre- 
sented a skit depicting the activi- 
ties of a student nurse in the hos- 
pital. The skit was under the di- 
rection of Marilyn Elias, sovial 
chairman. 




Steve Blount 

Blount Welcomes 
Freshmen Students 

I am grateful for the opportu- 
nity to welcome every freshman to 
Northwestern on behalf of the en- 
tire Student Body. 

I only wish it were possible for 
each student body member to greet 
each one of you personally. Sever- 
al years ago this might have been 
possible, but today our enrollment 
is rapidly expanding. This year we 
expect almost a 1000 more stu- 
dents than enrolled three years ago 
when I was a freshman. Even 
though the student body is becom- 
ing so much larger, there is no rea- 
son for its becoming depersona- 
lized. 

Welcome again to NSC, and if 
there is anything we can do to as- 
sist you, please feel free to call on 
the Student Council at any time. 



New Attendance 
Regulations Set 

Beginning this semester, stud- 
ents will find new attendance reg- 
ulations in effect. These were rec- 
ommended by a joint student-fac- 
ulty committee and recently adopt- 
ed by the college. 

Students absent from freshman 
and sophomore level courses must 
report to Mrs. Marjorie S. Billings- 
ley, Attendance Counselor, in the 
"Attendance Office," Room 16, 
basement of Caldwell Hall. In 
junior and senior level courses, 
absences may be approved by the 
instructor rather than the academ- 
ic deans. 

The new reguations, found in 
detail in the 1964-65 Demon Hand- 
book, were the result of faculty 
and student committee work and 
comply with minimum require- 
ments established by the State 
Board of Education. The General 
Catalogue lists the State Board's 
regulations. 



Poisonous Snakes 
Stolen Recently 

Two European pit vipers ac- 
quired in a trade by Theron 
Magers and loaned to the De- 
partment of Biological Sciences 
at Northwestern State College 
were stolen from the college. 

The snakes, less than six in- 
ches long and smaller than a 
pencil in diameter, are brown, 
with dark brown spots; they are 
considered more deadly than 
the coral snake. The pair was 
taken from a locked case where 
they were on display in sealed 
glass jars. ? 

Magers' father, Frank Magers, 
has the anti-venom serum. Any- 
one locating the snakes should 
notify the Campus Security or 
the City Police. 



H. Lee Prather 



Former NSC Coach, President Dies 
H. Lee Prather Served 38 Years 

H. Lee Prather, 78, a former president of Northwestern 
State College died at 6 a.m. Wednesday in Newellton following 
an extended illness. 



Known throughout the state as 
"Coach", Mr. Prather was born 
near Odessa, Mo., Oct. 10, 1886. 
He attended the University of Miss- 
ouri where he received the A.B. de- 
gree in 1910 and the LL.B. in 1912. 
He filled his first coaching assign- 
ment as coach of the Columbia 
Missouri High School teams in 
1911. 

In 1912, Coach Prather moved to 
Southwestern Louisiana Institute, 
Lafayette, where he remained for 
one year. 

In 1913, he was employed by 
Northwestern State College (then 
Louisiana State Normal College) 
where he remained for 38 years as 
a coach - - establishing a record 
for coaching tenure at one institu- 
tion. At Northwestern, Mr. Pra- 
ther coached all athletics - - foot- 
ball, basketball, track, and base- 
ball - - for approximately 20 years 
without an assistant. 

When Coach Prather came to 
NSC there was no conference and 
no eligibility rules. He helped to 
organize the old LIAA (Louisiana 
Intercollegiate Athletic Associa- 
tion.) In his long period of associa- 
tion with athletics, Mr. Prather 
successfully strived toward the de- 
velopment of the boy into a useful 
citizen. 

Although winning was not the 
paramount objective involved in 
Coach Prather's coaching, his won- 
lost record deserves mention. Re- 
cords for the entire 38 years are 



AWS Howdy Dance 
Held Last Week 

The AWS Annual Howdy Dance 
was held on Wednesday in the 
Men's gVm. Preceding the dance, 
the upperclassmen cheerleaders, 
Judy Gowland and Lynn Griffin, 
held a brief pep-rally to boost spi- 
rits for the Stephen F. Austin 
football game. 

Following the rally, Mrs. Lucille 
Hendrick, dean of women, Mrs. 
Addie Huckaby, assistant dean of 
women, and the AWS officers were 
introduced by Steve Blount, stu- 
dent body president. 

The major event of the evening 
was the selection of the prettiest 
freshman "flapper", and the craz- 
iest "crooner." Ann Kovar, of 
Leesville, and John Swint, of Bos- 
sier received the awards respect- 
ively. , 

The "Uniques" of Springhill 
played before a backdrop of multi- 
color crepe paper. 



not available, but records for 30 
years report an impressive 388 
victories as against 143 defeats. He 
had several conference champion- 
ship teams and reached the NAIA 
playoffs on one occasion. 

Mr. Prather was named president 
of Northwestern on Oct. 24, 1950, 
after having served as coach, ath- 
letic director, dean of men, and 
professor of government. Coach 
Prather remained as president of 
NSC from 1950 until May 15, 1954, 
when he retired. 

He was named to the highest 
honor that can be bestowed upon a 
coach - - membership in the Helms 
Foundation All-American Hall of 
Fame for Basketball. The North- 
western State College Alumni 
Association honored him in 1963 
by naming him an honorary mem- 
ber of the NSC Alumni Association 
at the annual homecoming day. 

Funeral services were held 
Thursday at the Union Church in 
Newellton under the direction of 
Carruthers Funeral Home, Tallu- 
lah. Interment was in the Newell- 
ton Cemetery. 



Popular Singers 
Booked For Oct. 12 

Tickets are now on sale for the 
appearance of the "Button Down 
Folk Music" of THE BRANDY- 
WINE SINGERS at the Fine Arts 
Auditorium October 12. The popu- 
lar all-star group of musicians and 
entertainers are currently on tour 
following a series of top school and 
college engagements. 

Noted for their severe criticism 
of folk singing groups, New York 
critics list THE BRANDYWINE 
SINGERS among their favorites. 
This genial well-schooled folk mu- 
sic group has captured the hearts 
of concert lovers wherever they 
have played, and the demand for 
their music is so great that repeat 
performances are played to bigger 
and better audiences every time. 

In other amusement centers 
throughout the country, "The But- 
ton Down Folk Music" of THE 
BRANDYWINE SINGERS has been 
featured at all the leading ball- 
rooms, theaters, and night clubs. 
This nationwide acceptance is a 
mark of greatness in the world of 
music. Through their recordings 
for Joy Records, THE BRANDY- 
WINE SINGERS should have a 
most successful and prosperous 
future. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1964 



Summer Honor Roll Released; 
School Of Education Leads 



The honor rolls for the summer 
session have been released by the 
respective academic deans. Those 
students who made the honor roll 
are listed below according to 
schools. 

School of Education 

Janie F. Adams, Lola Gay Aiken 
Gloria Jean Alexander, Freda Beth 
Allday, Charlotte D. Anderson, Al 
Anding, Suzanne L. Anding, Mary 
Beth Andries, James E. Arnold 
Betty G. Arthur, Elizabeth S. Ar- 
thur, Claire E. Baeder. 

Sandra Sue Bailey, Tom A. Bak- 
er, Linda K. Barnes, Cheryl Bess 
Barrett, Mary K. Barton, Mary Eve 
Baskerville, Janis P. Bass, Jerry 
0. Bass, Grover Lamar Bates, Sha- 
ron Lee Bayliss, Karen M. Bear- 
den, Sue Carol Beasley, Jeannie 
R. Behm. 

William Bell, KarenBennett, Toni 
Bennett, Georgia A. Blair, Mary 
Ann Banchard, Wanda J. Bolin, 
Charlotte A. Bonnette, George E. 
Bostick, Edward L. Bouriaque, Di- 
anna A. Braden, Bonnie J. Brad- 
ford, Carolyn Brandon, Judy L. 
Brister, Elwana P. Bristow, Mari- 
lyn C. Broussard, Barbara C. Brun- 
ing, Dorothea M. Bryan, Julia A. 
Bryan, Nina C. Burlile. 

Delores G. Burrow, Sandra M. 
Bush, David A. Butler, Sandra G. 
Byrd, Nancy L. Calaway, Anne E. 
Campbell, Jacquelen A. Capps, Ri- 
chard A. Capps, Polly A. Carpen- 
ter, Willie V. Carter, Cordelia F. 
Cash, Cheryl L. Chabaud, Deirdre 
L. Chaney, Martha A. Choate, San- 
dra T. Clark, Julie M. Clausen. 

Nancy K. Clayton, Janice Marie 
Cloud, Wiley C. Cole, Carroll J. 
Coleman, Barbara Colquette, Har- 
ry A. Creighton, Carrie D. Cren- 
shaw, Joy Sue Crump, Shelia Mae 
Culp, Susan G. Cupit, M. Virgina 
Curtis, Shirley Kay Dalme, Nancy 
J. Daniel, Ronnie Daniel, Inetha 
Daniels, Linda Ann Daughtry. 

Jo Ann Dauzat, Barbara E. Dean, 
Beth Deason, Sharon L. Derbonne, 
Mary Jane DeSoto, Betty S. Dew, 
Betty Sue DeWitt, Nancy C. Dick- 
inson, Rita E. Dobbins. Juanita 
Lynn Dow, Max C. Duggan, Cheryl 
C. Durand, Clarence O. Durand. 

Glenda F. Durr, Robert W. Durr, 
Eugene A. Eddlemon, Emily E- 



furd, Doris R. Ellzey, Ardie V. 
Estes, Rose A. Evans, Carolyn M. 
Everett, Ingrid M. Faber, Dana L. 
Faraldo, Linda S. Faraldo, Nona 
R Failey, Willis Farris, Delores 
B. Feazell, Joy D. Ferrant, Di- 
anne W. Fisher, Marilyn Fleming, 
Brenda E. Flurry, Derla A. Fonte- 
not, Mary L. Ford, Mary Ellen 
Francis. 

Martha J. Gahagan, Carolyn Sue 
Gamble, Dorothea J. Gardner, Eve- 
lyn J. Gass, Danny J. Gayer, Prince 
G. Gilcrease, Beverly L. Glass, 
James L. Gleason, Herbert Gra- 
ham, Patricia Graham, Sarah Faye 
Grunwald, Marhta W. Guay, Lelia 
Marie Guest. 

Gaylon Guillet, Ronnie E. Hall, 
Helen Elizabeth Ham, Eric R. Har- 
rington, Laurie A Harris, Lucille 
Hart, Melva J. Hataway, Mary P. 
Hayden, Linda D. Haynie, Lottie 
Hayward. 

Maribeth Henderson, Lottie Law 
Hennigan, Betty D. Hiton, Jackie 
Sue Hodges, Jane E. Hodnet, Patsy 
J. Holley, Lucille E. Holston, Mary 
L. Honeycutt, Mary Ann Horton, 
Shirley A. Hutchinson, Linda G. 
Jackson, Cora Lynn Jacobs, Ther- 
man James, Artuhr G. Jones, Car- 
ol A. Jones, Kenneth L. Jones, 
Mary Ann Jones, Robert L. Jones, 
Clyde H. Jordan, Jr. 

Jerry L. Keen, Eblene H. Kelly, 
Evelyn L. Kelly, Geraldine Kelly, 
Margaret S. Kelly, Rita Beth 
Kemp, Linda D. Kent, Patricia A. 
Kile, Mitchell L. King, Linda K. 
Kitchens, Betty Jean Knotts, Ar- 
thur Lambert, Jr., Barbara J. Lee, 
Norma G. Lemoine, Kay Ellen 
Leonard, Bettye M. Lilly, Andrea 
Lisenbea, Betty L. Lott, Judy A. 
Low, Mary F. Lowe, Carolyn Ann 
Lucas. 

Jere L. Lucky, Diane C. Mc- 
Bride, Irby M. McCan, Laura Mc- 
Cain, Don H. McCardle, Patrica R. 
McCook, Frances E. McDaniel, 
Thomas J. McDowell, Jr., Kay A. 
McElwee, G. Lenelle McFarland, 
Mildred McFarlane, Carroline Mc- 
Gee, Mary Beth McGee, John Mich- 
ael McGrew, Rebecca L. McKillips, 
Helen A. McLain , Sandra K. Mc- 
Millan, Olivia E. McNeely, Gene 
Maddox, Theresa Mahfouz, Lenora 
R. Manning. 

Betty L. Martin, Constance 
Mayes, Darrell D. Mayes, Vickey 



COLONIAL FLOWER SHOPPE 
Welcomes All NSC Students 

SEE US FOR YOUR FLOWERS AND 
COMPLETE FLORAL NEEDS 



422 Second Street 



R. Meador, Leona M. Leona M. 
Metcalfe, Sandra Kay Methvin, 
Carol Jean Meyers, Leah G. Mici- 
otto, Patricia L. Mitchell, Thomas 
R. Mitchell, Ed. M. Mittelbronn. 

Mary E. Morgan, Dana Taylor 
Mosely, Mary K. Moss, Carole Y. 
Mulina, Nancy Dees Mullins, Caro- 
yn J. Napier, Mary Lou Neal, Eliza- 
beth C. Nethery, Christine New- 
man, Dolores L. Nichols, Carolyn 
W. Oglesby, John J. O'Neill, Mel- 
ba J. Orsborn. 

Ruth G. Pace, Shirley S. Pace 
Carla Ruth Paul, Carolyn A. Paul, 
Larry E. Perdue, Gweneth L. 
Peterson, Jeanette K. Peterson, 
Dinah L. Pevy, Sarah W. Pilcher, 
Donna L. Pollard, Ursula F. Pre- 
witt, Bernadine Provenza, Ellen M. 
Prudhomme, Charlotte W. Ramsey, 
William M. Reid, Olivia A. Rhodes, 
Shari K. Richard, Barbara Richard- 
son. 

Lloyd I. Richardson, Edwena 
Roach, Alice C. Roberts, Sandra G. 
Rolland, Geneva C. Russell, Joanne 
Salter, Joe R. Salter, James E. 
Scruggs, Donna C. Segari, Pegy J. 
Seward, Peter D. Seymour, James 
A. Shahan, Neva M. Sharbono, 
Carolyn L. Shaub, Jeanelle Shaver, 
Lois P. Shelton, Edgar D. Shirley, 
Sherryl A. Short, Mildred Singue- 
field, Eileen Sledge. 

Judy C. Smith, Paula D. Smith, 
Mary L. Sperstad, Paula R, Spring- 
er, Louise A. Stothert, Joyce Ann 
Strong, Wayne Tabor, Mary Alice 
Taylor, Sandra F. Taylor, Hazel 
M. Thompson, John W. Thompson, 
Dale M. Tinsley, William M. Tong- 
let. 

Linda M. Townson, Mamie E. 
Trunzler, Virginia G. Tyler, 
Johnny D. Valentine, Susie L. Ver- 
cher, Patricia C. Vines, Nancy Wal- 
lace, Katy C. Watkins, Melinda 
Watkins, Linda K. Webb, Mary J. 
Weldon, B. Sue Wells, Frances 
Ann Wells, Roberta P. Wescott, 
Bobby R. West, Sandra Whitlock, 
Marcia Whittington, Carol Ann 
Williams, Mardel R. Williams. 

Mary M. Williams, Ross G. 
Williams, Thomas C. Williams, 
Donnie Willis, Jimmy D. Willis, 
Nancy A. Willis, Viola P. Willis, 
Wayne W. Willis, Linda Lou Wil- 
son, Margie F. Wilson, P. Ann Wil- 
son, Frances R. Winn, Linda D. 



Womack, Donald W. Wood, Ya- 
Donnie L. Wright, Glenda J. 
Young, Judy E. Young. 

School of Applied Arts 
and Sciences 

Bonnie C. Allen, Betty A. An- 
ders, William J. Armand, Francis 
A. Arnold, Charles V. Authement, 
George F. Barnes, Donald M. Ba- 
tes, Beverly A. Bell, Timothy L. 
Berry, Donna S. Booker, Jules P. 
Bordelon, Patricia G. Boutte, 
Jimmy L. Bradford, Larry D. 
Brady, Linda E. Brangato. 

Robert F. Breedlove, Ray B. 
Brooks.Michael E. Brouillette, Jim- 
mie L. Brown, Andrew M. Bruce, 
Ralph R. Caldwell, Frank W. Car- 
roll, Tommy C. Champlin, Barbara 
J. Clark, Edna A. Cleveland, Carl 
G. Cooley, James K. Coleman, Vir- 
ginia A. Day, Roy K. Derbonne, 
Barry L. Dillard, Richard Dubois. 

Melba R. Dunn, Robert L. Efurd, 
Heinz P. Faber, Howard W. Fan- 
ning, Carolyn A. Felts, William B. 
Fincher, John G. Fitzgerald, Patri- 
cia K. Fowler, Bruce Fraser, Fred- 
erick J. Gautreaux, Tommy S. Gay, 
Judi A. Gleason, William F. Gold- 
en, Horace W. Hamby, Gracie L 
Hart, Thelma S. Hawthorne, Frank 
S. Hines, Doris L. Hollingsworth, 
Gayle H. Howell, Sandra K. Jen- 
kins, Elizabeth A. Jowers, John 
Anthony Keith, Joseph L. Kirk- 
land, Jr., Bobby D. Land, Victor 
C. Lee. 

Eugene Barry Love, Margie A. 
Luttrell, Joseph L. McCarty, Carole 
E. McKneely, Jesse C. McWilliams, 
Elizabeth A. Meares, Frances N. 
Norwood, George M. Oliver III, 
Linda M. Parent, Alton William 
Parker, Jr., James A. Peninger, 
William A. Pierce, Sharon A. Pitts, 
John C. Prince, Curtis D. Ramsey. 

Glenda F. Randall, William N. 
Richardson, Jr., George W. Rogers, 
Michael P. Sabino, Linda A. Sch- 
midt, Ernest H. Sers, Sharon L. 
Shaffer, Clarence T. Shipp, Ronnie 
E. Shuler, Billie A. Simmons, Dor- 
val W. Stuckey, Robert E. Tal- 
madge, William L. Thomas, Caro- 
lyn J. Valentine, Marilyn V. Van- 
hoof, Mary J. Weaver, Martha C. 
Whaley, Charles White. 

Hazel B. Wiggins, John G. 
Williams, Sallie L. Wilson, Bonnie 
M. Wise, Abner P. Wood, William 
L. Wood, Thomas L. Woolley, 
Laurrel P. Worsham. 

School of Nursing 

Sherry Bamber, Faye Bankston, 
Patricia Benefield, Flora Behrnes, 
Faye Bolton, Lola Braley, Bobbie 
Brittingham, Collin Brossett, Lin- 



WELCOME 
Northwestern Students and 
Faculty Members 

WE HOPE THAT THE 1964-65 SESSION WILL BE 
A MOST SUCCESSFUL ONE FOR ALL OF YOU 

AS A PERSONAL SERVICE, CHECKS WILL BE 
CASHED UPON PRESENTATION OF YOUR I.D. 
CARD. 

For Your Drug Store Needs Come To 

Millspaugh's Drug Store 

590 Front at Church Streets 
"In The Heart Of Downtown Natchitoches" 



Broadmoor Giff 
And Furniture 

BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 

Welcome NSC Students 

THERE IS A COMPLETE LINE OF GIFTS WHICH 
VARY IN PRICES TO FIT ALL NSC STUDENTS' 
POCKETBOOKS. COME IN AND BROWSE. 



Nichols Dry Goods Company 

THE DOORS ARE ALWAYS OPEN TO N S C 
STUDENTS AND FACULTY. 



COME IN TODAY 



512 Front Street 



Phone 2413 



DAISY SHOPPE 

BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 

Welcome NSC Students 

TO ALL NSC STUDENTS 10% OFF FIRST 
PURCHASE WITH THIS AD. 
BRING THIS AD 



da Brown, Sheila Burleigh, Carol 
Buisson, Sandra Carter, Margaret 
Casey, Sally Cooper, Colleen Davis. 

Mary Lou Davidson, Sue Dear- 
mon, Phyllis De Rosia, Mary Pat 
Dow, Janet Ducote, John Edwards, 
Martha Emmons, Tommye Jo En- 
sminger, Donna Erickson, Sandra 
Evans, Carolyn Farrington, Janene 
Ferguson, Marjorie Floyd, Sandra 
Fronemthal, Kathy Gaddis, Rita 
Gallaspy, Camille Gennaro, Karen 
Gotaas. 

Barbara Haley, Sanfora Hames, 
Sandra Harris, Rita Harvey, Geor- 
gia Hebert, Judy Hickman, Jane 
Hill, Peggy Hill, Patricia Holley, 
Rosemary Hubbs, Barbara Hyde, 
Susan Hubka, Regina Hurst, Lou- 
ise Irwin, Benni Johnson, Luisa 
Johnson, Norma Gene Johnson, 
Sandra Kelly, Katherine King. 

Billie Lynch, Frances McElveen, 
Linda Malley, Janet Malone, Mary- 
lou Medlin, Marie Medica, Sara B. 
Mills, June Mott, Louellyn Muench, 
Madelyn Niemann, Judy Norred, 
Wanda Perkins, Cecile Phelps, Pat- 
ricia Porter, Patricia Power. 

Carmen Prestidge, Lucille Pull- 
man, Barbara Ramsey, Mydra 
Richardson, Leona Robinson, Ar- 
leen Rolling, Alexandra Sandefer, 
Theresa Sepulvado, Shirley Shaf- 
fer, Mattie Shaw, JoLynn Shelton, 
Mabel Shows, Pauline Sipes, Glo- 
ria Sisk, Betty Smith, Patricia L. 
Smith, Myrna Spillman. 

Andrea Terrell, Carol Thames, 
Jane Thompson, Jessica Tilton, 
Mary Ann Touchstone, Linda Tou- 
sek, Nikki Towry, Dedra Turner, 
Cynthia Vining, Marilyn Sue Wal- 
es, Sandra Walker, June Weisheit, 
Sharley Jo Wilder, Hazel Williams, 
Mary Beth Williamson, Jennifer 
Winn, Stephanie Woods, Corinne 
Wright. 

School of Arts 
and Sciences 

Sharon Andries, Sharon Ant- 
hony, James Ayers, William Bailey, 
Carolyn Barney, Roy Bell, Brenda 
Blackshear, Elizabeth Blewer, Gary 
Brazell, Ellison E. Brown, William 
Jay Bryan, Jerry Ann Bussey, Bar- 
bara Chapman, Nona Cobb. 

Sarah Cope, Roy Corley, Jim 
Cousins, Eric Crayon, Sherry 
Creighton, John Culpepper, Gary 
Cunningham, Larry Dean, Pink- 
ney Durham, Rodney Elkins, Julia 
Funderburk, Charles S. Gallien, 
Douglas Giles, Whitney Granger. 

Martha Hagewood, Gary Har- 
kins, Carlyn Hattaway, Jim Haw- 
Hiers, Charlotte Hood, Floyd Jack- 
son, David A. Kelly, Mary V. Kelly, 
Harry Kirk, Karen Knapp, Ken- 
neth Knotts, Claude Lancaster, 
Andrea Landry, Earl A. Lawley, 
Cheryl Lawson, Eleanor Ann Lee, 
John Edgar Lewis, Tommy Lewis, 
Sam Lucero, Gobel Lynn, Harry 
Meachum. 

Osborn Robert Miller, Wiley 
Mack Miller, Carol Gipson Moore, 
Lois Page, Benson Palmer, Gerald- 
ine Piatt, Jane Plum, Edward 
Price, James L. Prudhomme, Hodge 
Raburn, Wanda Radford, Sue Lang, 
ley Riley, James Roshto, Rod Run- 
yan, Susan Russell, Karen Scham- 
ber, Tommy Seabaugh, Mary Sel- 
lers. 

Rahn Sherman, Fred Smith, El- 
sie Steen, Kenneth Stephens, Jerry- 
ln Stevens, Amy Stiles, Linda 
Thompson, Randall Tilley, Billy 
Roy Toms, Helen Tousek, Frances 
Trundle, Patricia Unrath, Kenneth 
Volentine, Anne S. Weaver, Thom- 
as Whitehead, William Williams, 
John Woodyard, Glenda Wright, 
Mildred Wright. 



INVITATIONS 

Wedding 
Fraternal 
Printed or Engraved 



Baker's Printing 
and 
Office Supply 

Phone 2935 
St. Denis St. Natchitoches 



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



Editorials 



A NEW POLICY 



Since the "Current Sauce" is a student newspaper, it is 
necessary each year for the incoming editor to issue a state- 
ment of policy to be followed throughout his tenure of office. 
The following are the policies to be adhered to during this 
school year. 

In general, the "Current Sauce" will be run similar to any 
other good weekly newspaper. We intend to follow the prac- 
tices of good journalism and to strive to better the paper each 
week. Realizing that to some extene we are representing the 
students, faculty, administration and our advertisers, we plan 
to try to do the best job possible. 

The primary purpose of the "Current Sauce" is the dis- 
semination of news on the campus. During the next two sem- 
esters the "Sauce" will try to broaden its coverage and con- 
tinue to report "in depth" as much as possible. At all times 
we will strive to be as impartial as possible and to cover every 
major news happening. It is impossible for us to be present 
for every event; therefore, we are going to need help of all 
groups in reporting the news. 

Editorials this year will always be based on facts and will 
be the opinion of the staff members. Editorials other than those 
of the editor or his associates will be initialed and may not 
necessarily reflect the views of the entire staff. 

This newspaper will by no means be used to further any- 
one's personal, private, or political causes. It is strictly a 
NEWSpaper for the students of Northwestern State College 
and shall remain as such throughout this school year. 

We are always open to constructive criticism and sug 
gestions for the betterment of the "Current Sauce." 




Letters to the Editor are encouraged by the Current 
Sauce and will be printed whenever possible. However, they 
should not exceed 300 words as space is limited in the paper. 

Letters must be signed and accompanied by the contri- 
butor's return address for the purpose of certification. An 
unsigned letter will receive no consideration. If the writer 
desires, his name may be deleted, but the deletion will depend 
on content and will not be granted automatically. 

No partisanship will be shown in the printing of letters. 
All which conform to the above policy will be printed. 

The Current Sauce reserves the right to reject any letter 
because of content or character. 



Federal Service 
Entrance Tests 
Open To Seniors 

Those interested in submitting 
appications for the 1965 Federal 
Service Entrance Examination may 
obtain details from Mr. John T. 
Adams, examiner in charge, at 
the Natchitoches Post Office, Col- 
lege placement office, Civil Service 
Regional Offices; or from the 
U. S. Civil Service Comission, 
Washington, D. C. 20415. 

The examination is open is open 
to all college seniors and those 
persons of equivalent training. 
Careers are offered in two hundred 
kinds of positions in the capital 
city and over the United States as 
well as a few overseas positions, 
which will be filled. 

Starting salaries will be from 
$5,000 to $6,050, depending upon 
qualifications of persons of persons 
selected from thi examination. A 
limited number of Management 
Internships with starting salaries 
of $6,050 and $7,220 a year will 
also be filled . Applications for 
these positions must be filed by 
January 21, 1965. The closing date 
for other applications is April 15 
11965. 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 




C AMP MOW STQPEMTS, DEAN SPEASLie WILL £AVA WOPI? 

CLA£5 CUTS £i OUP. t&S£HCE POUCf," 



National Poetry 
Contest Opens 

The National Poetry Press an- 
nounced the opening of the teach- 
ers and college students' annual 
poetry contest. Winners will have 
their works published in the An- 
nual Anthology of College Poetry 
or the Annual Anthology of Teach- 
ers' Poetry. 

The recognition received through 
publication will reflect definite 
credit on the college, as well as 
satisfaction to those who see their 
efforts in print and it will also 
give one the opportunity to com- 
pare such work with that of others. 

Closcing date for submission of 
college poetry is November 5, of 
teachers' poetry January 1. En- 
tries should be sent to National 
Poetry Press, 3210 Selby Avenue, 
Los Angeles 34, California. 

Each entry must bear the name 
of author, home address, city, 
state, college attended or school 
where employed. 




A Song For Teachers 

Some say that teachers are made 
of stell; 

Their minds can think but their 

bodies can't feel; 
Iron and steel and hickory tea, 
Frowns and gripes from nine to 

three. 

You teach six full hours and what 

do you get? 
Another day older and deeper in 

debt. 

You pay your dues in this and that 
Then for twenty-nine days your 
billfold's flat. 

I got up one morning, it was cloudy 

and cool; 
I picked up my register and headed 

for school; 
I wrote 44 names in the Home 

Room roll, 
And the principal said, "Well, 

bless my soul." 
I got 44 kids and 32 seats; 
28 talking while 16 sleep. 
I can hardly get 'em all in through 

the door, 
If I don't watch out, they'll send 

me more. 
The last bell rings and I start for 

the door; 
My head's a-ringing and my feet 

are sore; 
I taught six full hours, my day is 

made, 

But I still have a hundred papers 

to grade. 
You teach six full hours and what 

do you get? 
Another day older and deeper in 

debt. 

I'll go to St. Peter, but I just can't 
stay, 

I gotta come back for the PTA. 



Dr. Hugh Land, assistant professor of biology at North- 
western State College, is shown holding a bird from Bra- 
zil as he addressed the Natchitoches Audobon Society 
last week on birds of South America. 

Dr. Land To Narrate Film For 
Washington Audubon Society 

Dr. Hugh Land, assistant professor of biology at North- 
western State College, is program chairman of the Natchito- 
ches chapter of the Audabon Society. He has given lectures to 

Audabon Societies in several cities, 
and will present and narrate his 
hour long color film; "Sights and 
Sounds of the Caribbean Low- 
land", for the Washington, D.C. 
society in December. 

Dr. Land recorded sounds of the 
forest as he photographed the 
birds and animals in action, mak- 
ing a unique natural history film. 

Membership in the local club is 
open to those interested in orni- 
thology. October 8, 7:30 p.m. will 
be the date of the next meeting, 
which will be held in the biology 
building on the college campus. 



Library Receives 
Microfilm Printer 

Northwestern State College's 
Russell Library has received a 
Reader-Printer machine and added 
the Moody's Investor's Service Pub- 
lications to the reference collec- 
tion of the library. 

The machine, afilmac 100, will 
print instantaneously on special 
paper, copies of items on micro- 
film. Since the library has thous- 
ands of items on microfilm file 
and is acquiring many more, the 
Reader-Printer should prove a val- 
uable aid to those doing research 
and to library users in general. 

One of the outstanding financial 
analysis of industrial corporations, 



English Teacher 
Appointed Judge 

Miss Marie Fletcher, associate 
professor of English at North- 
western State College, has been 
appointed as a regional judge for 
the National Council of Teachers 
of English Achievement Awards 
Program of 1964. Judges, English 
teachers from both colleges and 
high schools, will evaluate writing 
skills and literary awareness of 
nearly 7,000 high school partici- 
pants. 

Outstanding high school seniors 
will be granted recognition for ex- 
cellence in English by the Achieve- 
ment Awards Program. Finalists 
are announced in late November 
and are recommended for scholar- 
ship aid to all United States col- 
leges and universities. 

The competition is a part of a 
comprehensive effort of the 
National Council of Teachers of 
English to improve instruction in 
language and literature at all 
levels throughout the nations 
schools. 



Moody's Investor's Service Publi- 
cations are kept up to date by 
weekly supplements. Coupled with 
this is the recent acquisition of a 
complete file of the Journal of Fi- 
nance. 

D. MacKenzie, acting librarian, 
stated that these tools might be 
of great service to the students 
and faculty members in the busi- 
ness department and also to busi- 
ness men in the area. 



urrenf S 

ESTABLISHED 1914 



auce 



Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, In 
the fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
scription $3 the year payable in advance. 



Member of the Associated Collegiate Press 

Duffy Wall Editor-in-Chief 

Sharon Hillman Associate Editor 

Henry Mayfield News Editor 

Judy McLain Society Editor 

John Lewis Business Manager 

Linda Broughton .... Advertising Manager 

Roy G. Clark Faculty Adviser 

Editorial Staff: Linda Weber, Rusty Sav- 
age, Jerry BriU, Mary Ellen Davis, Rusty 
Savage, Gene Couvillion, Robert Durr, 
Max Duggan, Walley Hebert. 

Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not reflect 
the opinions of the student body or the 
administration and faculty of the college. 

The Current Sauce prints the news im- 
partially. It supports what it believes to 
be right, and opposes what it believes to 
be wrcng, regardless. 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1964 




Demons Slash Lumberjacks; Take Season Opener By 34-14 



Northwestern, led by the fine performances of Donnie 
Carroll, junior quarterback, and sophomore back Al Dodd, 
decisioned Stephen F. Austin's lumberjacks, pre-season favor- 
ites as Lone Star Conference champions, by a 34-14 score. 

The game, marked by frequent 
personal fouls and the ejection 
of three Demons and a lumberjack 



from the field of play, saw its first 
score as S.F.A.'s Billy Burt scored 




Return of the Classic 

This traditional favorife has been updated by Jarman 
to look and feel just right with today's "natural shoulder" 
clothing. It combines deep burgundy Cordoshell and golden 
brown Scotch grain upper leathers, has sturdy construction 
without excessive bulkiness". Truly a classic style which 
belongs in your wardrobe. Let us fit you in a pair, 



HUGHES MEN'S STORE 

FRONT STREET 
NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 



in the first quarter from six yards 
out. N.S.C retaliated with Carrol 
heaving an aerial bomb to Dodd, 
an eight-yard play. In the second 
period, Byers scored for S.F.A., 
whereupon Carroll threw this time 
to Henry Aymond for the marker. 
Here Jimmy Scott missed his only 
point after touchdown attempt of 
the night for the Demons, and the 
lumberjacks held a temporary 14- 
13 edge. 

With Carroll again at the helm, 
N.S.C. steamrolled to the one, 
where Carroll ran for the T.D., 
making the score 20-14. In the 
third period, Dodd contributed the 
outstanding run of the game, a 
62-yard touchdown jaunt, which, 
with Beasley's three-yard carry in 
the fourth frame, constituted the 
rest of the scoring in the game, 
witnessed by about 10,000 fans. 

The victory brings Chief Caddo 
back to our campus, (The Chief 
has been detained in Nacogdoches 
since last year's 10-0 S.F.A. vic- 
tory.) and also gives the Demons 
an 18-6-2 edge in the series dating 
back to 1924. 



Former Instructor 
Named Engineer 

Among four appointments to 
positions within Chemstrand's App- 
lications Research and Service De- 
partment announced by G.M. 
Shipman, department director, 
was that of A. Paul Smith, a for- 
mer physics instructor at North- 
western State College, as textile 
engineer in Creative Products. 




Gary Pittman, 45, charges through the line in the Demons 
34-14 victory over the Lumberjacks of SFA. 



SAVE-WAY- DAIRY- BAR 

Compare - Our - Quality Check - Our - Prices 



HAMBURGERS 
MILK-SHAKES 
FRENCH-FRIES 



COKES, ROOT-BEER, GRAPE, ORANGE 
SPRITE, AND LEMONADE 



15c 
15c 
15c 

10c & 15c 



Open io a.m. Til 9:30 p.m. 840 3rd Street 



WELCOME NSC STUDENTS 

COSMETICS 

Revelon - Faberge' - Max Factor - Dorothy Grey 

HALLMARK GREETING CARDS 

CANDIES 
Hollingsworth and Pangburn 

Charge Accounts Invited - Free Delivery 

Two Stores To Serve You 



DeBlieux's Pharmacy 

BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 
Phone 4582 



New Drug Store 

SECOND STREET 
Phone 2386 



Patronize 

Our 
Advertisers 




THE FINEST, MOST 
SATISFYING MEALS 
ARE FOUND AT 

Le Rendezvous 

113 Second St. 



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Demons To Host Pineville Wildcats 
In First Home Game Of Season 

The Northwestern State College Demons will have an op- 
portunity to perform before home fans for the first time this 
year when they play host to the powerful Wildcats of Louisiana 
College Saturday night. Louisiana 
College will be out to avenge last 
weeks 8-7 loss to powerful Louis- 
iana Tech while NSC will be out 
for their second straight win after 
a 34-14 win over the Lumberjacks 
of Stephen F. Austin. 

The series with Louisiana Col- 
lege is the second oldest series in 
the Demon's schedule. The Demons 
have fared well against the Wild- 
cats in the past as they have won 
32 and lost only 12. There has 
been seven ties. Since 1930 the 
longest winning streak that the 
Wildcats have been able to gain 
on the Demons is two games. This 
happened in 1958-59. The Demons 



Badminton Club 
Formed On Campus 

Northwestern State College has 
announced the starting of a bad- 
minton club here on the campus. 
This club will be open not only to 
the students and faculty of North- 
western but also to residents of 
Natchitoches. Those interested 
should contact Dr. Slaughter or 
Dr. Thomas at the Men's Gym. This 
club will be open to both men and 
women. Practice sessions will be 
from 2:30-8:00 on Tuesdays and 
from 6:00-10:00 on Thursdays. 

The NSC Badminton Club will 
also sponsor two tournaments. The 
first one will be the Louisiana 
Open Tournament to be held Dec- 
ember 11-12. The next tournament 
will be the Southern Badminton 
Association Tournament to be held 
March 12-14. The members will 
also be able to participate in the 
U.S. National Open Tournament to 
be held in New Orleans April 14-17. 

Competition in this sport will 
be doubles, mixed doubles, and 
singles. 



will have to stop the Wildcats this 
time or La. College will once again 
have a two game winning streak. 
In last year's game, the Wildcats 
struck early and then scored a 
final touchdown in the last quar- 
ter to gain a 13-7 victory over the 
Demons. 

Slated to see action for the De- 
mons this week will be Al Dodd 
and Donnie Carroll. In last weeks 
action Dodd showed the fans some 
running as he returned a kickoff 
64 yards and then returned a punt 
for 62 yards. He also scored a total 
of 12 points. Carroll showed some 
razzle dazzle play as he led the 
team well. He ran the ball for a to- 
tal of 56 yards, completed 8 passes 
for a total of 115 yards and two 
touchdowns and scored a touch- 
down himself. 

This weeks starting lineup will 
be Corwyn Aldredge and Dick 
Reding at ends, Ross Gwinn and 
Charles Ragus at tackles, Grover 
Colvin and Lawrence Nugent at 
guards, Fred Fulton at center, 
quarterback Don Beasley, Ed Hor- 
ton and James Aymond at half- 
backs, and Claude Patrick at full- 
back. 

Game time will be 8:00 p.m. 



Page 5 




Steve Blount, student body president, receives Chief Cad- 
do at the end of the football game last weekend between 
NSC and SFA. Northwestern regained possession of the 
Indian by beating the Lumberjacks 34-14. 



Freshmen Can File 
For Council Posts 

Freshmen students interested in 
serving as associates on the North- 
western State College Student 
Council have been granted until 
October 4, to file for the offices. 

Applicants may obtain forms 
from the Office of Student Rela- 
tions. 



WESLEY 
Foundation 

SUNDAY 

9:00 A.M.— Coffee 
9:30 A.M.— Forum 
6:00 P.M.— Bible Study 

WEDNESDAY 

5:00 P.M.— Supper 
5:45 P.M.— Program & Wor- 
ship 

FRIDAY 

7:30 A.M. — Morning Vespers 

OFFICE HOURS 

10:00 A.M.— 12 Noon 
1:00 P.M.— 2:30 P.M. 



BREWER'S SH0ELAND 

576 FRONT STREET 

WELCOME ALL NSC STUDENTS 
Headquarters For Campus Footwear 



Welcome NSC Students 

FROM 

TRESSIE'S BEAUTY SALON 

FOR APPOINTMENT CALL 4536 AND VISIT 
Tressie Watts Elsie Hernandez 

Irma Courtney Jean Boucher 

201 E. 3rd — Across from Broadmoor Shopping Center 



PENNYLAND 



1300 Washington 



Across From Peoples Motor Co. 



OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 
8 A.M.-12 P.M. 



Free Transportation To And From The College— 8 A.M. - 7 P.M. 

PHONE 3105 



Bi 



6 



POOL TABLES 
Brunswick 
Gold Crown 



Shuffle Board 
Domino Tables 
Moon Tables 
Bowling Tables 
Shooting Gallery 



2 



SNOOKER TABLES 
Brunswick 
Gold Crown 



SNACK BAR -AIR CONDITIONED 



ENTERTAINMENT FOR ALL -MEN - LADIES - CHILDREN 



For Fun - Relaxation - Pleasure Visit PENNYLAND 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAJCE 



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1964 



Alpha Sigma Alpha Has Busy Summer 



Alpha Sigma Alpha has been a 
busy sorority this summer. During 
the first part of September, rush 
workshop was held in Lake Char- 
les at the home of Sherry Gormly's 
grandparents. Their houseboat was 
made available to them and several 



to "get in" some skiing. Ann 
Bloch, who went to National Con- 
vention in Ashville, North Caro- 
lina this summer, entertained the 
group with several new songs that 
she learned at the Convention. 
Since the beginning of school. 



of the girls took this opportunity many meetings and discussions 



have been attended by all the 
making decorations and visiting 
the rushees has kept them quite 
busy. 

New National Membership Direc- 
tor, Judy Mathews, from Arkan- 
sas, talked to the group last Friday 
and Saturday, giving many helpful 
hints and tips on rush. It was 
quite an honor to be visited by a 
national officer. 



Fulbright-Hays Grants Available 
For Study In Latin America 



The United States is offering 
special oppertunities nuder the 
Fulbright-Hays Act to students 
for study in Latin America. 
Approximately eighty grants, be- 



For FREE Delivery To All N.S.C. Dormitories 

Call Z E S T O 



PHONE 

2385 



ORDERS MUST BE AT LEAST $1.00— PRICES DO NOT INCLUDE SALES TAX! 
"Please Clip Out And Tack Up In Your Room." 



Southern Maid Do-nuts, Tooj 



Owned and Operated by ZESTO! 
ONE CALL TO ZESTO DOES IT ALL! 
No extra charge for deliveries of Do-nuts 

PRICE LIST PER DOZEN — MINIMUM ORDER 



PLAIN GLAZED 
SUGAR DO-NUTS 
SUGAR WHITE 
CINNAMON 



60 



FILLED DO-NUTS 
CHOC. COVERED 
CINNAMON ROLLS 
PRETZEL ROLLS 
TWISTS 



70 



Sandwiches 



Drinks 



Zesto Burger 


20c 


Steak or Veal 


50c 


Hamburger 


30c 


Ham 


45c 


Bacon & Tomato 


45c 


Ham & Cheese 


50c 


Cheese 


30c 


Grilled Cheese 


25c 


Cheeseburger 


40c 


Hot Dog 


25c 


Korn Dog 


25c 


Shrimp 


50c 


Zesto Chicken Basket 


90c 



WITH FRENCH FRIES — 20c EXTRA 



PEACH OR APPLE 

PIE - - 20c 



PLEASE . . . Once order is placed, DO NOT 
phone about it. Slows us down — and believe 
me we are hurrying! 



7-Up 


25c 


Dr. Pepper 


25c 


Coca Cola 


25c 


Root Beer 


25c 


Lemonade 


25c 


All Frosted Drinks 


25c 


• Vanilla * Cherry 

• Chocolate • Strawberry 

• Butterscotch • Pineapple 

• Banana • Hot Fudge 

Malts & Shakes 


30c 


Sundaes 


25c 


Flavors As Above 

Ice Cream 


Pint 

30c 


Flavors As Above 

Ice Cream 


Quart 

55c 


CALL 2385 




For 




FREE 




DELIVERY! 





5 P.M. UNTIL 9:30 P.M. FOR DELIVERY 
TO ALL N.S.C. DORMS 



We Are N. S. C. Boostersl 



sides, those usually available, will 
be given for the 1965-66 academic 
year to beginning graduate stu- 
dents and graduating seniors. 

The program is supervised by 
the Board of Foreign Scholarships 
and administered by the Institute 
of International Education. 

This program which was started 
in 1963 will send students to the 
republics .of Venezuela, Guate- 
mala, Bolivia, Ecuador, El Salva- 
dor, Dominican Republic, Costa 
Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, Pana- 
ma, and Uruguay. 

Those applying must unmarried 
U. S. citizens with at least a bache- 
lor's degree by the beginning 
date of the grant and proficiency 
in the language of the host coun- 
try. Preference will be given to 
applicants in the fields of human- 
ities, history social sciences, polit- 
ical science, and law. 

Students will live in university 
housingwhen it is available and 
will be expected to participate in 
the academic and social life of the 
Assigned country. Candiates 
should specify for which country 
they are applying. 

Information may be obtained 
from the Fulbright Program Ad- 
viser on campus. 



NSC Graduate 
Named Librarian 

It was announced by Col. Ken- 
neth Cook, dean of New Mexico 
Military Institute, that Roger L. 
Christian, a graduate of Northwes- 
tern State College, has been ap- 
pointed head librarian. 

Mr. Christian is an alumni of 
Byrd High School, Shrevport. He 
graduated from NSC in 1959 with 
a Bachlor of Arts degree. Christ- 
ian was a member of the Alpha 
Beta Alpha National Honorary Li- 
brary Fraternity and the Black 
Knights drill team. 

After graduation he served six 
months active duty in the U.S. 
Army during which time he at- 
tended the basic officers training 
course and the Airborne School. 

Christian then returned to 
Shreveport and enrolled in Cen- 
tenary College where he received 
a teaching certificate. After teach- 
ing at Cameron High School and 
North Caddo High School, he 
worked on his master's degree at 
Louisiana State University. 



FOUND 

A black sports coat with an 
initialed M handkerchief has been 
found at the Progressive Men's 
Club in Shreveport. The loser may 
claim his coat in Dean Dudley G. 
Fulton's office. 



COMMUNITY 
CLEANERS 

Specialists In Nations 
Finest Dry Cleaning 

Professional Shirt 
Laundry 

Phone 2229 
103 Second Street 



ATTENTION STUDENTS 

All students interested 
in acquiring late laundry 
pick-up service contact: 

Bert Wiggins 
phone 6288 



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 




Shirley Simpson 
Chosen For Study 
In Europe 

Shirley Simpson, a Northwestern 
State Colege senior, left for Eur- 
ope August 26 on the S.S. Queen 
Elizabeth to enroll in the Uni- 
versity of Vienna. 

Miss Simpson was chosen for the 
study by the Institute of European 
Studies after hey had reviewed 
her scholastic achievements, lead- 
ership ability, and personality. 

Inaddition to her studies, Miss 
Simpson will have the opportunity 
to travel in France, Belgium, Ger- 
many, Italy, Greece, Egypt, Yugo- 
slavia, England, Spain, Switzer- 
land, and Austria. 

After her return from Europe, 
she will pursue her degree in ele- 
mentary education at Northwest- 



Sigma Kappa 
Initiates Six 

Delta Mu Chapter initiated six 
members September 15. The new 
members are Kathy Barten, Susan 
Massey, Sue Shipp, Jimmie Dawn 
Stamper, Jessie Sneed and Sandra 
Swenson. The initiates were pre- 
sented with bouquets of small pur- 
ple mums with lavander ribbons. 

Sandra Swenson, named the best 
pledge of the spring semester, was 
presented with a silver bracelet. 
Mrs. S. D. Swisher, who is presi- 
dent of the Shreveport-Bossier A- 
lumni Chapter, was present for 
the initiation and banquet. In late 
August the officers met with Mrs. 
Swisher at her home to discuss 
plans for rush. 

A memorial service was held at 
the Sigma Kappa house in memory 
of Monya Ann LeBoa September 
16. 



AWS Conducts Pre- 
plans Activities For 

The Associated Women Stu- 
dents of Northwestern State Col- 
lege held its pre-school workshop 
on campus September 11 to plan 
activities for the coming year. Pre- 
sent were Mrs. Lucille Hendrick, 
dean of women, Mrs. Addie Huck- 
aby, assistant dean of women, 
house directors, sophomore coun- 
selors, staff workers, and AWS 
council. 

The workshop officially opened 
on Friday with an officer's meet- 
ing, registration and a "Dutch 
Supper" at the El Camino Real 
Restaurant. Mrs. John S. Kyser 
was a special guest at the supper. 

Saturday's schedule was filled 
with general meetings, committee 
meetings and reports. Discussion 



Welcome To NSC 

Please Feel Free To Visit 
And Browse In Our Bookstore 
At Any Time 

REMEMBER! ! 

If The COLLEGE BOOKSTORE Does 
Not Have Well Get It. 

BAKER'S BOOK STORE 

Next to LeRendezvous 
'NSC's Favorite Bookstore' 



School Workshop 
Year 

was centered around plans for the 
Howdy Dance, Christmas at Home, 
Mom and Dad's Day, campus dan- 
ces, the AWS Honors Banquet, 
Queen Holiday in Dixie, and Home- 
coming. 

The Council for 1964-65 is as 
follows: Kate Thibodeaux, presi- 
dent; Irby McCan, vice-president; 
Becky Alphin, IAWS representa- 
tive; Mary Ann Jones, social chair- 
man 

Carolyn Brewer, corresponding 



Page 7 



Fishers Expanding 

Clyde and Diane Fisher of Apart- 
21, Vetstown, are the parents of a 
baby girl born September 17 at 
the Natchitoches Parish Hospital. 
She has been named Shawn Kath- 
leen. 

Clyde is a junior majoring in 
wildlife management and Diane 
graduated this summer. She ma- 
jored in English. 



secretary; Barbara Wallace, re- 
cording secretary; Prissy Dorgan, 
treasurer; Lynn Griffin, publicity 
chairman. 



TODD'S 



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Your Favorite Brands 



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• "Vicky-Vaughn and Marty" Dresses 

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• "Best-Form" Bras and Foundations 



FOR HIM 

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'Sports-Fan" Ivy Pants 



• "Wesboro" Shoes 

• "E&W" Shirts 

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Charge Accounts Invited 



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NSC Students 



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McCLUNG DRUG 
Welcomes Students and Faculty 
Of Northwestern State College 

WE ARE PROUD TO OFFER YOU 

Professional Prescription Service 
(We will gladly charge prescriptions to your parents if desired) 

Fast Free Delivery to Home or Dormitory 

Cashing of Personal or College Checks 
(Please bring ID card) 

Monthly Charge Accounts 
— plus — 

Cosmetics by Max Factor, Tussy, Coty, Revlon, Lanvin and others 
Stationery and school supplies 
Pipes and Tobacco 

Swim Caps and Swimming Equipment 
Magazines and Greeting Cards 

Excellent Selection of Educational Paperback Books 

McCLUNG DRUG COMPANY 

Serving Natchitoches and NSC Since 1891 
Front & Church Streets Phone 2461 



Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCK 



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1964 



Panhellenic Tea Held Last Week 



The Varnado Drawing Room was 
the setting Tuesday, September 15, 
for the Panhellenic Tea. As the 
freshmen women entered, they 
were greeted by Dean of Women, 
Mrs. Lucille Hendrick; Assistant 
Dean of Women, Miss Addie Huc- 
kaby; President of Panhellenic 
Council, Miss Rae Belle Warner; 
President of Alpha Sigma Alpha, 
Miss Bonnie Frazier; President of 
Delta Zeta, Miss Mary Ann Jones; 
President of Sigma Sigma Sigma, 
Miss Melinda Watkins; and the 



sponsors of each sorority. 

Each sorority had a lovely table 
decorated in their respective col- 
ors. Sorority women guided the 
freshmen to each of these four 
sorority display tables where the 
sororities had their jewelry and 
magines on display. The rushees 
enjoyed talking about their par- 
ticular sorority, its jewelry, and 
its aims. 

Over two hundred twenty fresh- 
men women attended the tea be- 
tween the hours of 6 and 8 p.m. 



WELCOME NSC STUDENTS 

EARL'S BEAUTY SHOP 

LATEST MODERN EQUIPMENT PLUS LATEST 
IN ALL HAIR STYLES 



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COLORING and BLEACHING, FACIALS, MANICURES, 
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PHONE 4059 



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1 . . . 8x10 . . . Portrait plus 16 wallet size . . . $7.00 
WE DO NOT HAVE A SITTING CHAGE 



UHRBACH'S STUDIO 

(Your Potpourri Photographer) 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 

NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 
Phones — 5556 — 5557 





Maxwell Seeking 
Freshman Office 

My main purpose in running for 
president is to help develop the 
potential of Northwestern State 
College's largest freshman class. 

I believe that through the right 
representation, the freshman can 
have a stronger effect of the gov- 
ernment of the college. Since we 
are by far the largest class, we 
should have someone to stand up 
for our views and opinions and 
who is willing to work with the 
other members of the Council. 

If I am elected president of the 
freshman class I will work dili- 
gently for the betterment of the 
College and the freshmen. 



CANE THEATRE 

Phone 2922 
Natchitoches, La. 



ADMISSION 
Adult— $1.00 Student— 75c 
Children — 25c 



Thurs. — Wed. 



WINNER OF 3 
ACADEMY AWARDS 



24 



I* 

if GREAT 
* STARS! 



I TOP 



hum ujiiLivMiiiH pic«im 

HOW! 
THE; 

WEST! 

WftS: 

WON! 



Among the candidates seeking 
freshman class offices is Gordon 
Parker. He is running for Presi- 
dent of the fershman class. 



DON 
Theatre 



Goldwater Meeting 

College students for Goldwater. 
Meeting at 7:00 p.m. Friday at 
113 St. Denis Street, Goldwater 
Headquarters, EVERYBODY IN- 
VITED. 



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NOW SHOWING 



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Pamela Tiffin 

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— Color — 



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George Peppard 

Alan Ladd 
Bob Cummings 
Martha Hayer 

Elizabeth Ashley 

Starring In 




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Child .50 



Paul Newman 

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—Plus- 
Debbie Reynolds 

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Both in Color 



Sun.-Mon.-Tues. 



Walt Disney's 
'SUMMER MAGIC 

Starring 
Haley Mills 
Burl Ives 
Dorothy McGuire 
In Color 



Wednesday 
'BUCK NIGHT' 



Admission — $1.00 per 
car — All persons must 
be inside of car — 

"THE THRILL 
OF IT ALL" 

Doris Day 
James Garner 

—Plus- 
Shirley Jones 
In 

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Both in Color 

Features Show 
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Member FDIC 



NSC Enrollment Figure Exceeds 4000 For First Time 



With an enrollment of 4278, 
Northwestern State College offi- 
cially closed registration Monday 
night. This is an increase of 14.5 
per cent over the 1963 figure, Reg- 
istrar Otis R. Crew announced. The 
per cent of growth during the last 
decade was 53 per cent. 

The total registration figure is 
an increase of 542 students over 
the previous fall when enrollment 
reached its all-time high of 3736. 



The figure for the current semes- 
ter does not include those students 
who enrolled in off-campus cour- 
ses on Monday evening. Of the to- 
tal number, 2164 students are men 
and 2114 are women. 

Graduate School 

Graduate enrollment increased 
52 per cent over the previous fall 
with an increase of 165 students to 
bring the total graduate enrollment 
to 480. This is the largest enroll- 



ment ever recorded in a regular 
semester and emphasizes the fact 
that the Graduate School has en- 
joyed a steady growth since it was 
established in 1954. 

Breakdown of undergraduate 
schools indicates that the School 
of Arts and Sciences - - comprising 
the departments of languages, bio- 
logical sciences, physical sciences, 
microbiology, mathematics, and 
social sciences - - experienced a 



growth of 23 per cent for a total 
enrollment of 863. 

Education Leads 

Other undergraduate school en- 
rollments are: School of Applied 
Arts and Sciences, 974; Education, 
1642; and Nursing, 319. Another 
striking comparison is the fact that 
the enrollment in the School of 
Education is greater than that of 
the entire College only a decade 
ago. 



The Student Personnel offices 
report that 2693 students are liv- 
ing in college housing facilities; 
1390 are men and 1303 women. A 
report from the two College dining 
halls reveals that a total of 6702 
meals were served to the NSC stu- 
dents Monday. Campus Security es- 
timates that approximately 423 
faculty and staff members and 
1680 students have registered cars 
for campus use. 




urrent 




auce 



VOL. LI— No. 4 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1964 



Goldwater Rally 
Scheduled Here 

Charlton Lyons, state chairman 
of the Goldwater for President 
Committee will appear at the Nat- 
chitoches Parish Fairgrounds, Oc- 
tober 8, at 7 p.m. to celebrate the 
opening of the Goldwater cam- 
paign in Natchitoches Parish, an- 
nounces Dr. Burton T. Dupree, Jr., 
executive chairman of the Natchi- 
toches Parish Committee. 

The "Bucks for Barry" truck 
which was christened by Peggy 
make its initial appearance at the 
fairgrounds in order to raise part 
of 15 million dollars, an expendi- 
ture proposed by the senator as 
his campaign expense. 



Miss Etta Hi 
Appointed Dean 

Miss Etta Anne Hincker has 
been named dean of the School of 
Nursing at Northwestern State Col- 
lege and promoted to the rank of 
associate professor. 

Dean Hincker, who joined the 
NSC faculty in 1957 as assistant 
dean, has served as acting dean of 
nursing during the past year. 

Born in Texas, Miss Hincker re- 
ceived the bachelor of science de- 





NSC CHEERLEADERS and Demon Mascot beam with joy 
over NSC's victory over Louisiana College last Saturday 
night. The are: (kneeling left to right), Pam Rushing and 
Ann Kovar; standing, Judy Gowland, Tommy Watson and 
Lynn Griffin. 



Freshman Run-off, State Fair 
Elections Scheduled Tuesday 



A run-off for freshman class of- 
ficers will be held Tuesday in the 
student center. Running for pres- 
ident of the freshman class will 
be Jim Leabo and Grover Wiggins. 
Also in the run-off are Rita Al- 
len and James Beam who are seek- 
ing the vice-presidency of the 
class. A run-off for women's rep- 
resentative is between Pat Holley 



and Pat Pace. 

Elected in the first primary were 
Scotty Maxwell, men's representa- 
tive, and Bonnie McCandlish, sec- 
retary-treasurer. 

Also held in connection with the 
freshman elections will be the e- 
lection of the state fair court. Con- 
testants for the court were nomi- 
nated by the men students Thurs- 
day night. 



NSC Concert Association Announces 
Completion Of Schedule For Year 



The Northwestern-Natchitoches 
Concert Association has completed 
its list of attractions for the 1964- 
65 season, according to Dr. Jo- 
seph Carlucci, association chair- 
man. 

There will be five programs in 
the series this year, beginning on 
October 27 with a performance in 
English of Puccini's popular opera 
"La Boheme" by the Goldovsky 
Grand Opera Theater of Boston. 
The Goldovsky group boasts a 
company of fifty, including so- 
loists, chorus and orchesrta. The 
opera will be fully staged with 
special costumes, scenery and 
lighting. 

Piano Recital 

On December 3, a piano recital 
will be presented by Walter Rob- 
ert, resident artist-teacher at the 
Indiana University School of Mu- 
sic. Mr. Robert studied extensively 
at many of the great music centers 
of Europe, and has concertized 
widely both abroad and in the 
United States. He is greatly sought 
after as a performer, teacher and 
lecturer. 

The Romeros, a Spanish guitar 
troupe consisting of a father and 



Dean Hincker 

gree from St. Xavier College, Chi- 
cago, and the master of science in 
nursing education from the Cath- 
olic University of America. 

Before joining the Northwestern 
staff she was an instructor in the 
Garfield Hospital School of Nur- 
sing, Washington, D.C.; staff lieu- 
tenant in the Army Nurse Corps, 
and assistant director of the Char- 
ity Hospital School of Nursing, New 
Orleans. 

A frequent contributor to pro- 
fessional nursing and education 
journals, Dean Hincker is a mem- 
ber of the Louisiana and National 
League for Nursing, Kappa Gam- 
ma Pi, and the American Associa- 
tion of University Women, is a 
member of the board of directors 
of the Louisiana State Nurses Asso- 
ciation, and chairman of the na- 
tional committee on economic se- 
curity of the educational adminis- 
trators, consultants and teachers 
section of the American Nurses 
Association. 




ROBERT E. GILDERSLEEVE, right, new professor of 
military science at Northwestern State College is awarded 
the first Oak Leaf Cluster to the Army Commendation 
Medal by Brig. Gen. Seth L. Weld, Jr., Chief of Staff, 
Fourth U.S. Army, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, for meri- 
torious service while attached to Allied Land Forces, 
South East, advance command post, Salonika, Greece. 
The ceremony took place at Fort Sam Houston. 



Demons Open GSC 
Campaign At NLSC 

Northwestern State College 
opens its GSC campaign this week 
as they travel to Monroe to battle 
the Northeast Indians. It will be 
an important win for either team 
as a win would put them in a tie 
for the GSC lead. 

The Indians have not fared too 
well against the Demons in past 
years as they have won only two 
and lost ten. The last time North- 
east was able to uphend the De- 
mons was in 1960 when they were 
on the winning end of a 7-6 ver- 
dict. In last year's action, the In- 
dians led the Demons in everything 
but points scored. They picked up 
188 yards rushing to the Demons 
185 and they also outpassed the 
Demons by 140 tol06 yards. North- 
western crossed the goal line more 
times though as they ended up 
with a 27-19 win. 

Northeast stands 0-1 for this 
years action. In last week's opener, 
they dropped a 7-6 decision to Del- 
ta State. Top gun for the Indians 
was Quarterback Johnny Garrison 
who ran the ball 17 times for a 
total of 107 yards. 

The Demons will have two top 
backs going for them this week. 
They are James Aymond and Al 
Dodd. Aymond has run the ball 
nine times for a total of 93 yards 
and a 10.3 yard average per carry. 
He has also caught four passes for 
a total of 82 yards and one touch- 
down. Dodd is the team's leading 
scorer with 12 points. He also 
leads in punt and kickoff returns 
as he is averaging 27.7 yards re- 
turn on punts and 46.0 yards on 
kickoffs. He is tied with Aymond 
on pass receiving as he has also 
hauled in four for a total of 56 
yards and a touchdown. 

Game time will be at 8 p.m. 



his three sons, are engaged for a 
performance on January 11. The 
Romeros have enjoyed several suc- 
cessful coast-to-coast tours of the 
United States and recently have 
been featured on television. 

Al Hirt 

February 8 will bring to the 
NSC campus Al Hirt and his fa- 
mous New Orleans jazz group. The 
popular bearded trumpeter has 
skyrocketed to fame in recent 
years through his recordings and 
television appearances, as well as 
through appearances in his own es- 
tablishment in the Crescent City. 
The series concludes on March 9 
with the Kaleidoscope Players, 
four actors — three men and a wo- 
man — doing "An evening with Carl 
Sandburg". The program features 
readings from Sandburg's books 
and poems, and songs from the 
Carl Sandburg Songbag. 

Season tickets for the series are 
still available at $7.00 for adults 
and $3.50 for students through 
high school age. NSC students are 
admitted on their I.D. cards. Tic- 
kets may be purchased through 
Dr. Carlucci at the Northwestern 
Music Department, or from Mrs. 
Lucy Straughan, association sec- 
retary. All programs except Al 
Hirt's are scheduled for the Fine 
Arts Auditorium at 8:00 p.m. The 
Hirt show will be in the new NSC 
Coliseum for greater seating capa- 
city. 



College Placement 
Interviews Set 

College Placement Service in- 
terviews will begin the 13th of Oc- 
tober, it was announced by Mr. Joe 
W. Webb, director. Mr. Webb made 
the following statement: "I en- 
courage students in all depart- 
ments to avail themselves of the 
advantages offered by the place- 
ment office." 

All education majors who are do- 
ing or have done their student 
teaching, and all seniors in other 
fields are urged to stop in at the 
Placement Service office on the 
first floor of Caldwell Hall and fill 
out the necessary forms. This will 
allow their file to be referred to 
by prospective employers. 

The placement service also fur- 
nishes, free of charge to all sen- 
iors, the College Placement Ann- 
ual, which gives complete infor- 
mation about major companies, 
their policies, opportunities for 
employment, and instructions for 
applications. 

On October 13, Mr. Carl J. Sala- 
mone of the Service Center Army 
and Air Force exchange service 
will conduct interviews. On Octo- 
ber 15, The Schlumberger Com- 
pany will interview students in 
physics, industrial arts, and mathe- 
matics. Continental Emsco, on Oc- 
tober 20, will interview January 
graduates, and on October 27, a 
representative of Shell Oil Com- 
pany will speak to industrial arts 
majors and students with science 
backgrounds for their Production 
Operations' department. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1964 




ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA members at the Panhellenic Re- 
ception held in the Varnado Drawing Room on Tuesday, 
September 15th were Bonnie Frazier, Mrs. Robert Easley, 
Julie Frazier, Ann Bloch, Betty Bloch, and Sherry Gormly. 



Pi Kcspps Have 
Busy Rush Week 

The past week has been a very 
busy one for the Pi Kapp members. 
With rush going on and studies 
too, they are having a pretty busy 
schedule. 

At the first rush party, Pi Kapp 
guests were Weldon Walker, chap- 
ter advisor and purchasing agent 
at Northwestern, and Jerry Willis, 
district president, who talked about 
the history of the fraternity. 

At present two of last semester's 
pledges, Ted Baxter and Chris Do- 
colas, are growing their traditional 
"beards" and are soon to become 
members. 

A "pet" project of the Pi Kapps 
is the fraternity house on fraterni- 
ty row; work will commence on it 
in the very near future. 



INVITATIONS 

Wedding 
Fraternal 
Printed or Engraved 



Baker's Printing 
and 
Office Supply 

Phone 2935 
St. Denis St. Natchitoches 



Music Auditions 
Scheduled Here 

The 1964 Louisiana Music Teach- 
ers' Association Student Auditions 
for high school musicians in the 
Natchitoches area will be held on 
Saturday, October 10, in the Fine 
Arts Building on the Northwestern 
State College campus. 

Entries will be accepted in the 
piano, voice and instrumental cate- 
gories. Entrants must be student 
members of LMTA, a student of an 
LMTA member, and must perform 
from memory a twenty-minute pro- 
gram of works from the Classic, 
Romantic and Modern Periods. 
One winner will be selected 



Class Pictures 
For Potpourri 
Next Week 

Class pictures for the 1965 Pot- 
pourri will be taken in the Green 
Room of the Fine Arts Auditorium 
during the week of October 5-9, 
between the hours of 1:00-4:30 
p.m. and 6:30-9:00 p.m. Each stu- 
dent is urged to have his picture 
made at the time designated for 
his class. The schedule is as fol- 
lows: 

Seniors and Graduate Students, 
Monday, Oct. 5. 
Juniors, Tuesday, Oct. 6. 
Sophomores, Wednesday, Oct. 7. 
Freshmen, Thursday, Oct. 8. 

The photographer will remain 
here through Friday, October 9, so 
all students will have an opportu- 
nity to have their class pictures 
made. 

Senior men are to wear white 
shirts and dark ties; senior women, 
round necked blouses, as gowns 
will be provided. Caps will not be 
worn. 

All other students are requested 
to wear white shirts, dark ties, and 
a dark coat. Each student is urged 
to have his picture made for this 
year's Potpourri. 



from each of several audition cen- 
ters to participate in the State Fi- 
nal Auditions during the annual 
LMTA Convention to be held in 
Shreveport October 29-31. 

For further information, inter- 
ested students and teachers should 
contact Dr. Joseph B. Carlucci, 
head of the NSC Music Department 
and chairman of the Natchitoches 
audition center. 



SPECIAL TO COLLEGE STUDENTS 

1 . . . 5x7 . . . Portrait plus 8 wallet size . . . $4.75 
1 . . . 8x10 . . . Portrait plus 16 wallet size . . . $7.00 
WE DO NOT HAVE A SITTING CHARGE 



UHRBACH'S STUDIO 

(Your Potpourri Photographer) 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 

NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 
Phones — 5556 — 5557 




DELTA ZETA MEMBERS at the Panhellenic Reception 
held in the Varnado Drawing Room, September 15th were 
Chris Newsome, Sandy Corken, Lynn Griffen, Mrs. Wood- 
ard, Carolyn Thomas, Ann Creegan, Cecilia Shea, and 
Mary Ann Jones. 

DZ's Have New Rush Advisor 



After a fun-filled summer, the 
Delta Zetas are anticipating a year' 
highligthed by new sisters, parties, 
and projects. These past two weeks 
of rush parties have brought to a 
climax a wonderful feeling of new 
found friends. 

The Delta Zetas are happy to 
have Miss Kay Morrow as Rush 
Advisor. Kay is a graduate of the 
University of Texas and is a past 
president of the Alpha Tau Chap- 
ter of Delta Zeta. 

Best wishes go out to our fra- 
ternity sweethearts, Cecilia Shea, 
Sandy Corkern, and Judy Winn, 
as they participate in fraternity 
rush. 

All Delta Zetas would like to 
take this oppourtunity to thank 
their Man of the Year, Sam Lu- 
cero, for all the time he has given 
so freely during rush. Thanks are 



also extended to their alumni from 
Northwestern's faculty, Mrs. Rue 
and Dr. Marie Fletcher, for their 
help during rush week. 

It is the D.Z.'s wish that each 
rushee, regardless of the sorority 
she pledges, finds that feeling of 
siterhood that only sorority wom- 
en possess. 



Variety Show Set 

Sigma Alpha Iota and Phi Mu 
Alpha, music fraternities at North- 
western State College, will pre- 
sent "Phi-Si Follies," a variety 
show 8 p.m., Friday in the Little 
Theatre. 

The fraternities are putting on 
the show to raise funds for a 
scholarship which is awarded an- 
nually to an outstanding music 
major. Admission is 50 cents. 



TODD'S 



750 
FRONT ST. 



"A FRIENDLY Store" 

Your Favorite Brands 

FOR HER 

• "Vicky-Vaughn and Marty" Dresses 

• "Paddle & Saddle" Sportswear 

• "Happy Hiker" Shoes 

•> "Phil-Maid" Lingerie and Sleepwear 

• "Best-Form" Bras and Foundations 

FOR HIM 

• "Lee Rider" Jeans 

• "Sports-Fan" Ivy Pants 

• "Wesboro" Shoes 

• "E&W" Shirts 

•> "B.V.D." Underwear 

Charge Accounts Invited 



As The Seasons 
Change — Let Us 
Style Your Hair 

Carry You Through 
Your Busy Days 



Call 
Daisy Rachal 
or 

Mrs. Scott 
at 

Delta 
Beauty Salon 

108 Amulet Phone 2951 



El Camino Real Restaurant and Motel 

"The House of Hospitality" 

For an elaborate banquet, simple supper, dinner, or an early morning 
breakfast, the El Camino Real Restaurant is the place to take family 
and friends. There the food matches the warm genuine hospitality 
shown through courteous service, warm homey atmosphere and beau- 
tiful decor. 

We invite you to visit the "House of Hospitality" where the food is pre- 
pared especially for YOU. 

Highway 6 West 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 




Give The New Rules A Chance 

Recently there has been much concern about the class 
attendance regulations initiated by the College this summer 
and also uncertainty about them. Many students have been 
wondering how the new rules will affect them and the pro- 
cedures required in getting classes excused. Following is a 
brief summary of the new rules and our opinion on them. 

For the freshman and sophomore level courses, the rules 
remain virtually unchanged. Instructors will call the roll each 
day and report all absences to the Attendance Officer who will 
record these absences on individual attendance records kept 
in his office. 

Students in these courses will go directly to the Attend- 
ance Officer to get excuses. Excuses must be submitted to the 
Attendance Officer no later than the third day after the stu- 
dent returns to class. If the absence is approved, the student 
will be given a class absence approval form which he must 
present to the instructor within one week following his return 
to class. 

Instructors of junior and senior level courses shall report 
the name of each student who is absent if the instructor de- 
cides that the absence is inexcusable. If a student incurs three 
consecutive absences, the instructor shall notify the Attend- 
ance Officer of this fact so that the cause may be determined. 

In the event a student incurs a total of three unexcused 
absences in a course, the academic dean, parents, adviser, and 
the student are advised of this fact by the Attendance Officer. 

If a student accumulates a number of absences in a course, 
whether excused or unexcused, that exceeds three times the 
number of scheduled class sessions per week, the academic 
dean will take action to determine whether the student is to 
be dismissed from the course or to be allowed to continue in 
the course. 

Any student penalized for being absent an excessive 
number of times may appeal to the Committee on Admissions, 
Credits, and Graduation. This appeal must be presented in 
writing to the Attendance Officer within three days of the date 
of the letter of dismissal and must outline the basis of the 
request. The student may also appear before the Committee. 

Realizing that these rules are new, we must wait before 
making a final decision on their merit. This is definitely a step 
in the right direction and the full cooperation by the students 
should be given before deciding that one is opposed to the 
change. 



Bookstore Situation Critical 

The case of the bookstore was critical. The lines were 
unbelievably long. When one got to the door at twenty-five 
until twelve, the workers decided that it was closing time. It 
matters not that the alledged closing time is twelve noon. If 
you did manage to squeeze inside, you found that the clerks 
were not overly courteous and books for certain courses must 
be purchased after classes have met. 

This of course means that after the instructor prescribes 
the proper text, you again went through the procedure of 
attempting to get your books. Naturally by this time, the books 
had all been sold, so you will have to wait for the next ship- 
ment. 

We shall always have problems, but this particular situa- 
tion could be alleviated somewhat if more help could be se- 
cured for the bookstore clerks, and closing hours would be 
made more uniform. 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 




"^?L1N[75 LIKE A Ve&V HTeZSevNCr COU&5 — W5 

wmmeMoDBRN owe? men I was in -school/ 



Student Council 
Minutes 

The regular meeting of the 
Northwestern Student Council was 
called to order by President Steve 
Blount. 

Blount announced that "The 
Four Seasons" had been contract- 
ed to play at NSC November 16. 

It was suggested that "Chief 
Caddo" and the NSC-Louisiana Col- 
lege banner be moved from the 
coliseum to the student center. 
Several locations in the student 
center were suggested. A discus- 
sion followed. Carolyn Thomas 
moved that "Chief Caddo" and the 
NSC-Louisiana College banner be 
transferred from the coliseum to 
the student center. Seconded by 
J.O. Charrier. Motion passed. Jim 
Berry suggested that all needed 
repairs be made to "Chief Caddo" 
before the Indian is moved. 

Blount announced that "The 
Downbeats" would give a free 
dance for the students September 
30. The men's gym and the coli- 
seum were suggested as possible 
places it could be held. 

J. O. Charrier announced that 
freshmen elections would be held 
Tuesday, September 29. Charrier 
reminded the election committee 
to be at the voting booths at 7 p.m. 

R. J. Ardoin asked that the lights 
at the tennis court be repaired. 

Milton Rhea called attention to 
the fact that the grass and litter 
behind South Hall was very bad 
last year and that this situation 
should be corrected. 

Jimmy Berry pointed out that 
there have been an excess number 
of beer bottles thrown on our 
campus. Students are urged not to 
litter our campus with any type 
rubbish. 

There being no further business, 
the meeting was adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Carolyn Thomas 
Secretary 




LETTERS 
To The 
EDITOR 



4713 Carolyn Lane 
Shreveport, Louisiana 
September 22, 1964 

Editor, 

THE CURRENT SAUCE 
Northwestern State College 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 

Dear Sir: 

May an ole grad, circa 1949, add 
a few words to your pages? 

I had a moving experience today. 
At Oak Terrace Junior High 
School, Shreveport, Louisiana. I 
instruct ninth graders in world 
geography. 

We invited Miss Catherine Win- 
ters, retired NSC professor of his- 
tory, to address the ninth grade 
on the general topic of American- 
ism. In short, Miss Winters "wow- 
ed" us. She inspired the young- 
sters and electrified the faculty. 
Frankly, I had forgotten the great- 
ness of this great lady, this great 
teacher, this great American. Is 
the present student body aware 
that she exists, that she still lives 
in Natchitoches; that she was, and 
is, truly an "institution"? Do they 
make 'em like her anymore? Have 
you heard of her? Have you looked 
her up? 

We are always glad to have visi- 
tors from NSC, ex or current. Last 
year your president offered to 
visit us but somehow we could 
never land him. Just as well, for 
nothing could top today. 

This is just a reminder that we 
alumni are proud of your progress, 
the new buildings, the parking lots, 
and all the other trimmings of the 
new society in the college setting. 
We just don't want you to forget 
what went before and who went 
before. If you're ever curious a- 
bout this, look up Miss Winters. 
She's better than ever. 

Sincerely yours, 
Frances Rhodes, BA '49 



THE BRANDYWINE SINGERS, shown above, will appear 
at the Fine Arts Auditorium October 12. Tickets are now 
on sale for the appearance of the "Button Down Folk 
Music" entertainers. 



Historic Tour Of Natchitoches 
Scheduled By Ladies In Calico 



The Ladies in Calico, members j 
of the Association of Natchitoches 
Women for the Preservation of 
Historic Natchitoches, have an- 
nounced their annual historic 
tour of picturesque homes, church- 
es, and other places of interest. 
Mrs. John Kyser, general chairman, 
has invited all interested North- 
western State College students to 
join the tour. 

On October 10 and 11 the tours 
will be conducted from 9:30 a.m. 
to 1:30 p.m. within Natchitoches. 
The Cane River tour will be from 
1:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m. Admis- 
sion will be $3.50, including ad- 
mittance to homes and churches. 
For the Cane River Tour only, the 
charge will be $2.50. The student 
rate for an all day tour is $1.50. 

Natchitoches, the oldest settle- 
ment in the original Louisiana Pur- 
chase was founded in 1714 by the 
French under St. Denis. It is amaz- 
ing how the romantic traditions 
have lived and interesting how 
the new is blended with the old. 

In the ninth annual fall tour, 
the Ladies in Calico will begin at 
!i!he Lemee House o'n Jefferson 
Street. This is a typical town house 
of the early 1800's with a distinct 
old world atmosphere. 

Recently restored and redecorat- 
ed, the Church of the Immaculate 
Conception will be a highlight of 
the tour. This Catholic church on 
the corner of Second and Church 
Streets, was built in 1856 as the 
Cathedral of St. Francis of Assisi. 

Further down the street is the 
Trinity Episcopal Church and Par- 
ish House, partly a memorial to 
Maria de Peyster. Bishop Leon- 
idas Polk, the "Fighting Bishop," 
laid the cornerstone for this love- 
ly church in 1857. A new educa- 
tional building in the French co- 
lonial style has been added. 

The Dunckleman Home on the 
corner of Poete and Cypress 
Streets was formerly known as the 
Chaplin House. It is a fine exam- 
ple of a compact and unpreten- 
tious style that was suited to the 
thriving frontiertown that was 
Natchitoches in the 1840's. 

Last on the list is the Chaplin 
Home at 434 Second Street. Its 
grey walls and red shutters are 
the original built by Thomas Per- 
ch Chaplin for his young wife, 
Lize Breazeale. It contains many 
interesting souvenirs of the two 
old Natchitoches families. 

First stop on the Cane River 
Tour will be Cherokee, the home 
of Mrs. E. G. Murphy. This interest- 



ing French raised-type cottage of 
early colonial Natchitoches was 
the setting for the famous Bossier- 
Gaiennie duel fought over politi- 
cal differences. 

Next will be the home of Mrs. C. 
Vernon Cloutier, Beau Fort. Huge 
cisterns in the garden here recall 
the early history of Fort Charles 
erected shortly after the original 
land grant of 1764. The present 
home was built by J. Pierre Em- 
manuel Prudhomme for his eldest 
son, Narcisse Prudhomme. It is 
furnished with many rare and old 
pieces of furniture of the French 
Creole type. 

Oakland, present home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Alphonse Prudh&mme, 
the eighth generation of Prud- 
hommes living on the same site 
is the third stop. The entire house 
is made of hand-hewn cypress 
logs. The present plantation is part 
of a land grant given in the eigh- 
teenth century to Doctor Jean Bap- 
tiste Prudhomme. An interesting 
curio room has rare old farm, sur- 
gical, and household articles. Rare 
paintings hang on its walls. 

Famous Melrose, old home of the 
Henry family, built in 1830, and 
still containing many of the valu- 
able historical collections of the 
late Mrs. "Cammie" Henry will be 
shown. Many writers and artists 
have received inspiration for much 
of their work on the log cabins on 
its grounds. Yucca House, the 
home of the enterprising freed Af- 
rican slave Marie Therese, is still 
there; so is the African Hut, a rare 
architectural gem with its mural 
of primitive art by Clementine. 



urrent Sauce 

ESTABLISHED 1914 

Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
scription $3 the year payable in advance. 

Member of the Associated CoUegiate Press 

Duffy Wall Editor-in-Chief 

Sharon Hillman Associate Editor 

Henry Mayfield News Editor 

Judy McLain Society Editor 

John Lewis Business Manager 

Linda Broughton .... Advertising Manager 

Roy G. Clark Faculty Adviser 

Editorial Staff: Linda Weber, Rusty Sav- 
age, Jerry Brill, Mary Ellen Davis, Rusty 
Savage, Gene Couvillion, Robert Durr, 
Max Duggan, Walley Hebert. 

Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not reflect 
the opinions of the student body or the 
administration and faculty of the college. 

The Current Sauce prints the news im- 
partially. It supports what it believes to 
be right, and opposes what it believes to 
be wrcng, regardless. 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1964 




SPORTS DESK 



By - Utrry B r >i 



a q p q □ p O ^ ~* a qja<3 q p nr^ 



As the fall semester gets under 
way, sports seem to fill the air and 
be the main topic of conversation. 
The purpose of this column will be 
to try and add to that conversation 
by giving out sports facts, fore- 
casts, and fictions. It will be pub- 
lished each week in the "Current 
Sauce" in the sports section. Ideas 
of the student body would be app- 
reciated. 

This year, eight star awards have 
already been given. These awards 
are given to a player if he scores 
a safety, intercepts a pass, or re- 
covers a fumble. These stars are 
worn on the helmets of the play- 
ers who receive them. Two play- 
ers, Claude Patrick and Al Dodd, 
have received two stars. Other 
players receiving them are Kenny 
Guillot, Corwyn Aldredge, Grover 
Colvin, and Hubert Adams. 

Each week, this column will try 
to predict the winners of ten foot- 
ball games. The games that will be 
covered will be those of all the 
teams in the GSC and of major cil- 
leges surrounding the area. To 
start things off, this weeks pre- 
dictions will be: 

NSC (14) over Northeast - - - De- 
mons have shown good signs so 
far but they will have to be up for 
this one. 

La. Tech (7) over East Texas State 

College The bulldogs could 

bite the dust in this one. 

USL (1) over Southeastern - - - 

An early upset. 

McNeese (21) over Howard - . - 
McNeese is riddled by injuries but 
should have little trouble. 

LSU (10) over Florida Bayou 

Bengals should chase Gators back 
to the swamps. 

Ole Miss (24) over Houston--- 
The rebels will rise again. 
Arkansas (14) over TCU - - - Raz- 
orbacks should continue their win- 
ning ways. 

Alabama (28) over Vanderbilt - - - 
High Tide warnings are given for 
this game. 



Horton And Parker Get Stagg Award 



This weeks Alonzo Stagg Award 
is given to two members of the 
Northwestern backfield. They are 
halfback Ed Horton and fullback 
Bobby Parker. These players were 
chosen for this award because of 
their fine play in the Demons' 16- 



14 win over Louisiana College. 

Others who were named to the 
weekly honor roll were center 
Fred Fulton, ends Corwyn Al- 
dredge and Mike Creel, and tack- 
les Charles Ragus and George Cog- 
nevich. 





Bobby Parker 



Ed Horton 



Natchitoches 
Laundromat 

936 College Avenue 

CONVENIENT TO 
ALL STUDENTS 

Open 24 hours a day 
7 days a week 



Malts 



Frosted Drinks 
Hamburgers 
Southern Maid Do-Nuts 



Visit 



ZESTO 

For Free Delivery To Dorm Call — 2385 




LOOK YOUR BEST 
ON CAMPUS . . . 

Well conditioned shoes are an im- 
portant part of your appearance. 



SHOE REPAIRS 
OF 

ALL KINDS 

Special 
RANDY PEDIC 

Basketball Shoes 



Orthopedic Corrections 
Western Style Belts & Wallets 
Moccasins 
Polishes - Laces - Dyes 

GUNTER'S SHOE SERVICE 

BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 



GARY PITTMAN (45) fights off tacklers as he picks up 
yardage for the Demons in their tilt against Louisiana 
College last week. The Demons went on to win the game 
16-14 after the loss of a couple of safeties by Louisiana 
College. 



BROADMOOR BARBER and 
BEAUTY SHOP 

EXPERIENCED HELP 
Donnis Whisnette — Hair Stylest 
Jo Ann Smith — Tressie Mitchell 

Archie LaCaze — Cecil Tildon 
Woodrow Mitchell — Jessie Rikard 

If your hair is not becoming to you — 
You should be coming to us. 



SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY OFFER 

GET SET Hair Spray 
Regular and Hard-to-Hold 
$2.00 size - only $1.10 

— Also Featured This Week — 

LIPSTICKS 
by 

•' Max Factor 
• Tussy 



• Revlon 

• Coty 



McCLUNG DRUG STORE 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS SINCE 1891 
Front & Church Sts. phone 2461 

FREE DELIVERY TO ALL COLLEGE DORMS 



NSC BOOSTER CLUB 

These are the friendly folks of the Natchitoches area who belong to the NSC Radio 
Booster Club, that makes possible the sports action of the Demons on KNOC 
radio. They belong to this club as an expression of their interest in NSC and its 
students. In belonging to this club, they also purchase over $1000 worth of foot- 
ball and basketball tickets. 



FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS and LOAN 
EL CAMINO RESTAURANT and MOTEL 
BAKERS TOWN and CAMPUS BOOKSTORE 
HENRY-SCOTT INSURANCE AGENCY 
B. and F. COLORIZER CENTER 
CENTRAL LOUISIANA CLAIMS SERVICE 
COLONIAL FLOWER SHOP 
WARREN'S MARKET— DAIRY QUEEN 
SANDEFUR'S JEWELRY 
MOTEL LOUISIENNE 
P&C REXALL DRUG STORE 
CLECO NATURAL GAS SERVICE 
JAMES TEXACO STATION 



GIBSON'S GULF STATION 
NEW DRUG STORE 
CENTAL WAREHOUSE 
WADDLE 'N 

PEOPLE'S BANK & TRUST 
DIXIE CONCRETE -BRICK 
COBB CHEVROLET 
ZESTO 

UHRBACH'S STUDIO 
BUILDER'S SERVICE 
DIXIE FOOD STORE 
LEWIS' LADIES WEAR 
LILLEY'S FURNITURE 



TOWNE HOUSE RESTAURANT 
WESTERN AUTO ASSOCIATE STORE 
CITY BANK & TRUST COMPANY 
MILLSPAUGH'S DRUG STORE 
DARAY PONTIAC-BUICK 
GIBSON'S DISCOUNT CENTER 
FOWLER'S RECREATION CENTER 
LINDSEY-CHEATWOOD PLUMBING CO. 
MASON'S EASTSIDE ESSO STATION 
McCLUNG DRUG STORE 
DOUG'S STEAKHOUSE 
EXCHANGE BANK and TRUST 
MIKE'S PACKAGE STORE 



-KNOC- 

THE DEMON SPORTS VOICE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 5 



Demons Edge Past Wildcats; Remain Undefeated 



Northwestern sustained a last 
period rally by the the stubborn 
Louisiana College Wildcats when 
quarterback Phil Troutman fumb- 
led the ball on the NSC 9-yard line 
and guard Grover Colvin recovered 
to give the Demons a close 16-14 
victory. 

Troutman had led the Wildcat's 
attack from their own 34-yard line, 
gaining two vital first downs on a 
4-yard run and an 11-yard clutch 
pass. A five yard penalty against 
Northwestern preceded the late 
rally. 

The Demons, having kept the 
Wildcats pinned down in their own 
territory throughout much of the 
first half, were first to score when 
punter Eddie Crook stepped back 
out of the end zone for a safety. 
Another safety was attributed to 
the Demons score early in the se- 
cond period when end Corwyn Aid- 
rich and fullback Claude Patrick 
tackled Troutman in the end zone 
giving NSC a 4-0 margin. 

Louisiana College halted a NSC 
drive when center Eugene Jeans 



Catering to those who 
care about the health and 
beauty of their hair 

CHARM 
BEAUTY SHOP 



Phone 3948 



114 Lee St. 



Open Monday Noon Till 
Saturday Noon 



recovered Demon quarterback Don 
Beasley's fumble at the Wildcat 
14. Fullback Dave Corley then 
picked up 13 yards and quarter- 
back Bob Boisvert hit halfback 
Dickie Dunn with a 54-yard pass 
to the 17. Halfback Sonny White 
scored around end from the four 
and Corley kicked the PAT as the 
Wildcats led 7-4 at halftime. 

NSC came back to score early in 
the third quarter when halfback 
Al Dodd intercepted a Boisvert 
pass on the Northwestern 24 and 
returned it to the forty to start the 
NSC touchdown drive. A 19-yard 
pass from Beasley to end Dick Red- 
ing proved to be the key play in 
the ensuing drive which ended 
with a 5-yard burst to halfback Ed 
Horton. The extra point kick 



failed. With two minutes, forty- 
five seconds left in the third per- 
iod, the Wildcats went ahead 14- 
10 when Troutman scored from the 
one to climax a drive from their 
own 12 yard line. The big play 
in the scoring drive was a 35 yard 
pass from Troutman to Brockmey- 
er to the NSC 8. 

Halfback Dave Gleason took the 
ball on a kickoff return and romp- 
ed 44 yards to the Wildcat 38. 
Then the Demons drove for what 
turned out to be their winning 
margin. Halfbacks Gary 
and Dave Gleason, and 
Harold Petrie took turns carrying 
the ball. Petrie took it over from 
the four. Beasley's pass on a two- 
point conversion attempt failed. 



Pittman 
fullback 



Concert Hour Will Return On KNOC 



The Concert Hour, a two-hour 
program of recorded classical and 
semi-classical music, will return to 
the air for the sixth consecutive 
year on Sunday afternoon, Oct. 4, 
at 1 p.m. 



The program will emanate from 
the studios of radio station KNOC 
in Natchitoches. Continuing as 
commentator for the sixth year 
will be Dr. Joseph B. Carlucci, 
head of the Music Department. 



Broadmoor Gift 
And Furniture 

BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 

Welcome NSC Students 

THERE IS A COMPLETE LINE OF GIFTS WHICH 
VARY IN PRICES TO FIT ALL NSC STUDENTS' 
POCKETBOOKS. COME IN AND BROWSE. 



WELCOME N.S.C. 

YES ... A SINCERE AND HEARTY WELCOME TO ALL NORTHWESTERN 
STATE COLLEGE FRESHMEN STUDENTS, AND TO WELCOME BACK ALL 
UPPER CLASSMEN AND FACULTY MEMBERS. HOPING TO SEE EACH 
OF YOU SOON, AND TO BE OF SOME SERVICE TO YOU! 

Management and Employees 

MORGAN & LINDSEY 

530 FRONT STREET 
NATCHITOCHES, LA. 



it staples 

term papers and class notes, photo- 
graphs, news items, themes, reports. 




BILL'S DOLLAR STORE 

768 Front Street 

Welcomes you the Staff, Students of Northwestern 
State College to our city. 

While here we invite you to visit us and let 
us help you with all of your needs. 

Make BILL'S your headquarters for Shoes, Clothing, Houseware & 
Novelties. Once you shop BILL'S you always will. 



■ 



Phone 9475 



Joe Peltier, Manager 




it tacks 

notes to bulletin board, pennants) 
to wall, shelf paper, drawer linings. 




it fastens 

party costumes, prom decorations) 
school projects, posters, stage sets, 




It's the "Tot 50" 

Swinglme 



Stapler 



UNCONDITIONALLY 
GUARANTEED 




(Including 1000 staples): 
Larger tin CUB Desk Stapler 
only $1.49 

No bigger than a pack of gum. Refills ( 
available everywhere. Made in U.S.A. 1 
£t any stationery, variety, book store! 

LONQ HMD CITY U NEW YOHfr 



WELCOME NSC STUDENTS 

EARL'S BEAUTY SHOP 

LATEST MODERN EQUIPMENT PLUS LATEST 
IN ALL HAIR STYLES 



SPECIALIZING IN COLD WAVES, ALL TYPES 
COLORING and BLEACHING, FACIALS, MANICURES, 
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Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAJCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1964 




National Teacher Examinations 
To Be Offered Quarterly 



A 

Selected as the prettiest freshman "flapper" and the 
craziest "crooner" were Ann Kovar and John Swint. They 
were chosen at the annual AWS Howdy Dance held at the 
beginning of the fall semester. 



Southern Literature Center 
To Be Established At NSC 

The Northwestern State College Languages Department 
has initiated a sequence of courses in Southern literature with 
the offering of two courses this semester. The department 
plans to establish a center for writ- 
ing and for critical study of South- 
ern authors and literature, accord- 
ing to Dr. William Tornwall, de- 
partment head. 

The two three-hour courses are 
The Beginnings of Southern Lit- 
erature, a study of the development 
of Southern literature to 1920 with 
emphasis on the plantation novel, 
and The Southern Renaissance, a 
study of the flowering of literary 
culture in the South from 1920 to 
the present, with emphasis on the 
fiction of William Faulkner, the 
Agrarian movement, Southern 
poetry, and present trends in 
Southern writing. 

Melvin E. Bradford, specialist in 
the field of Southern literature has 
been employed in the NSC Eng- 



lish division to teach the two cour- 
ses, the first of which is being of- 
fered this fall, with the second to 
be offered next spring. Bradford 
studied under Donald Davidson 
and Randall Stewart, noted experts 
in their field at Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity. He is also the author of 
numerous critical articles on 
Southern literature published in 
leading literary journals. 

Other members of the NSC Eng- 
lish faculty who have Southern lit- 
erature as their special field of 
study include Dr. Marie Fletcher, 
Miss Rebecca Rogers, and Clyde 
Miller, who has published a novel, 
Summer Dancers, which has Mel- 
rose Plantation, located near Nat- 
chitoches, as its setting. 



The Educational Testing Service 
announced that college seniors 
preparing to teach school may take 
the National Teacher Examination 
on four different test dates each 
year instead of one. 

The dates for testing are: Dec- 
ember 12, 1964; and March 20, 
July 17, and October 2, 1965. The 
tests will be given at more than 

Creative Writers 
Met Last Week 

The Creative Writers Club of 
Northwestern State College met 
last week at the home of Mrs. 
Carol Johnson, faculty adviser. 

Officers for the club's second 
active year were elected. They are: 
Robert Durr, president; Louis Nar- 
dini, vice president; Beuford Frye, 
secretary-treasurer; and Wally He- 
bert, reporter. 

Club members worked with col- 
lege administration last year on 
the publication of "Scoop", the lit- 
erary magazine in the "Demon 
Handbook." Plans are now under- 
way for the next issue of "Scoop." 
All Northwestern students may 
submit works before a deadline to 
be announced. 

The purposes of the club are to 
promote interest in creative writ- 
ing and to enable members to help 
each other by way of criticism and 
discussion. The club also works to 
instill an atmosphere and reputa- 
tion that will attract new creative 
talent to Northwestern. 

Meetings are held every second 
Thursday night at seven in Mrs. 
Johnson's home. The next meeting 
will be October 8. Visitors and new 
members are welcome regardless 
of major or classification. 



FOUND: One ladies' watch in the 
Student Center. Owner please 
come by Mrs. Scroggins' office and 
identify it. 




Northwestern State College 
Students Are Always 



WELCOME 



at 



SANDEFUR JEWELERS 
117 St. Denis Phone 6390 



NO ONE BUT YOU 

CAN GIVE YOUR 
PORTRAIT 

Many people would like to 
have it. Many people deserve 
to have it. 

Call us today, won't you? Let 
our professional staff create a 
portrait that is really you — a 
portrait you can give with 
happiness. 




John C. Guillet 

Photography 

403 Second Street 
Ph. 2381 Natchitoches, La. 



550 locations in the 50 states, ETS 
said. 

Scores are used by many larger 
school districts for employment of 
new teachers and by several states 
for certification or licensing of 
all seniors perparing to teach to 
take the examinations. Lists of 
school systems which use the ex- 
amination results are distributed 
to colleges. 

Prospective teachers may take 
the Common Examinations which 
measure the professional and gen- 
eral prepartion of teachers, and 
one of 13 Teaching Area Exami- 
nations which measure mastery of 
the subject they expect to teach. 

Prospective teachers should con- 
tact the school systems in which 
they seek employment, or their 
colleges, for specific advice on the 
examinations and dates. A bulle- 
tin of information may be obtained 
from the placement office, school 
personnel departments, or directly 
from National Teacher Examina- 
tions, Educational Testing Service, 
Princeton, New Jersey 08540. 



Training School 
Being Held Here 

The Louisiana State University 
In-Service Training School is hold- 
ing classes at 6 p.m. each Tuesday 
in the Coliseum at Northwestern 
State College. 

Classes are being taught by Mr. 
Lee Smith of the General Exten- 
tion Division of L.S.U. Approxi- 
mately 56 law enforcement offi- 
cers from the surrounding area 
are enrolled. 

The 15 week course, which be- 
gan September 2, will continue 
through December 14. The Course 
covers all phases of police investi- 
gation and is intended primarily 
for those police personnel now on 
active duty. 



Gildersleeve 
To Lead ROTC 

Lt. Col. Robert E. Gildersleeve 
of Northwestern State College was 
among a group of seven newly as- 
signed professors of military 
science and tactics in the Fourth 
US Army area who met at Fort 
Sam Houston, Texas, September 
21-22. 

According to Lt. Col. L.W. Bai- 
ley, ROTC inspection liaison offi- 
cer of the office of the deputy 
chief of staff for reserve forces, 
Headquarters Fourth Army, the 
meeting was held to acquaint the 
professors with aspects of reserve 
forces activities in the Fourth Ar- 
my area. 



WESLEY 
Foundation 

SUNDAY 

9:00 A.M.— Coffee 
9:30 A.M.— Forum 
6:00 P.M.— Bible Study 

WEDNESDAY 

5:00 P.M.— Supper 
5:45 P.M. — Program & Wor- 
ship 

FRIDAY 

7:30 A.M. — Morning Vespers 

OFFICE HOURS 

10:00 A.M.— 12 Noon 
1:00 P.M.— 2:30 P.M. 



"OOCA ANO "MM" AM UMIIMD TTUt*.M/u»«t 

WHICH ICENTIFV OMIV TMK PNOOUOT OF THt COCA-COLA COMPANY 




Life's a picnic when you're refreshed. 
V Coca-Cola, with its cold crisp taste, 
is always just right, 
never too sweet . . . refreshes best. 



things gO 

better,! 

* ^with 

CoKe 




Bottled under the authority of The Coca-Cola Company by: ~" " " ~ " 

NATCHITOCHES COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 



Student Council 
Minutes 

Setember 21, 1964 

The regular meeting of the 
Northwestern Student Council was 
held at 6:00 P.M. in Bullard Hall. 
The meeting was called to order 
by President Steve Blount. 

Blount announced his appoint- 
ment of Roy Corley to the post of 
Parlimentarian for the Student 
Council. 

President Blount announced that 
it is probable that the Downbeats 
and the Rhythm Dukes will play 
at the Wednesday night dances 
auternately. The next Wednesday 
night dance will be held in the 
student center, however, it will be 
investigated as to whether or not 
the men's gym or the coliseum 
might be used due to over crowded 
conditions. Steve appointed J.O. 
Charrier, Vice President, to sur- 
vey the use of two bands and the 
use of the afore mentioned places 
for the dances. It was also an- 
nounced that the first two dances 
would be free to students. 

The council voted to have the 
Rhythm Dukes as the band for the 
Victory Dance on Saturday night 
following the Louisiana College 
game 

Each class president was instruct- 
ed to make any appointments nec- 
essary to fill class officer positions. 

The small sign to appear over 
Chief Caddo wa adopted by the 
council, and Jon Gibson volun- 
teered to make the sign for the 
council. 

It was announced that Freshmen 
class officers would be elected on 
Sept. 29, 1964. Petitions from all 
prospective applicants must be in 
Dean Fulton's office by Sept. 28, 
at 12:00 noon. 

The entertainment committee re- 
ported that the Brandywine Sing- 
ers had been contracted to appear 
See Council, p. 8 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
SERVICES 
Old Lemee House 
Jefferson St, 
Every Sunday 11:00 A.M. 
All are welcome 



"Specializing In 
Hair Shaping" 

TRESSIES 
Beauty Salon 

For Appointments 
Call 4336 And Visit 

Tressie Watts 
Elsie Hernandez 
Irma Courtney 
Jean Boucher 



COMMUNITY 
CLEANERS 

Specialists In Nations 
Finest Dry Cleaning 

Professional Shirt 
Laundry 

Phone 2229 
103 Second Street 




Business Teachers To Meet Here 



The regional meeting of the Lou- 
isiana Business Teachers' Associa- 
tion will be held on the North- 
western State College campus, Oc- 
tober 3. 

The meeting, scheduled for the 
Business Administration Building, 
will hold registration at 8:30 a.m. 
and the program begins at 9. 

Dr. Leo T. Allbritten, dean of 
the graduate school and of instruc- 
tion at NSC, will deliver the wel- 
come address. 

According to N. B. Morrison, 
head of the NSC business depart- 



PRESIDENT OF TAU KAPPA EPSILON international, 
(right), on campus recently to aid in the reorganization of 
the TKE fraternity. Pictured with him are three of the 
members who are working to reorganize the chapter. 




STUDENTS 

Let us pamper your 
parents when they come 
to visit you. 

For Room Reservations 
dial 6401 

'Wake-up Coffee and Papers' 



ment, the program topic is "What 
High School Teachers of Business 
Need to Know About Data Process- 
ing." 

Program speaker will be Miss 
Claudine Kennedy, assistant pro- 
fessor of business at Louisiana 
Tech. 

Mrs. Lusterine Fisher of Plea- 
sant Hill is currently serving as 
president of the LBTA which is co- 
sponsoring the meeting with the 
Northwestern Business Depart- 
ment. 



First 25 In To Buy 
WRECK TECH Sweat Shirts 

25% Discount 

If The College Bookstore Does 

Not Have It We'll Get It. 

BAKER'S BOOK STORE 

Next to LeRendezvous 
'NSC's Favorite Bookstore' 



Waddle N Grill 

Highway 1 South Phone 4949 

Breakfast Varieties From our Char Broiler 



SERVED ANY HOUR 

Country Fresh Eggs (2) with Toast and Jelly.. 

With Bacon or Sausage _ 

With Home Baked Ham _ 



One Country Fresh Egg with Toast and Jelly... 

With Bacon or Sausage _ 

With Home Baked Ham 

Hot Fresh Fruit Tarts 

With Ice Cream™. 



Individual Dry Cereal — with Pure Cream.. 

Individual Dry Cereal — with Milk 

Bacon or Sausage 



Home Baked Ham 

Sweet Roll — Plain or Grilled.. 



.50 
.80 
.90 
.35 
.65 
.75 
.15 
.25 
.40 
.25 
.30 
.40 
.15 



Toast and Jelly 15 



Crispy Hashed Brown Potatoes.. 

Crinkle-Cut French Fries 

Onion Rings _ 



Meat Pie with Crispy Salad, French 
Fries or Hash Browns 



WAFFLES 

Waddle-N Waffle with Butter and Syrup.. 
Waddle-N Waffle with Sausage or Bacon.. 
Soup and Salad _ 



APPETIZERS AND SOUP 

Fresh Orange Juice 15 Large 

Chilled Tomato Juice 15 Large 

Soup _ _ 

CHILLED SALADS 

Combination Salad, choice of dressing.. 



(French or Thousand Island Dressing) 
(Blue Cheese) 

TASTY SANDWICHES 

Combination Ham and Cheese 

Bacon, Lettuce and Tomato _ 

Fried Ham and Egg . 

Fried or Baked Ham 

Bacon and Egg __ 

Fried Egg - 

Grilled Cheese 

Shrimpburger — 

Crab Burger 



Fishburger Supreme with French 

Fries, or Hash Browns 

Fishburger _ 



.20 
.20 
.35 

.85 



.35 
.65 
.60 



.25 
.25 
.25 



.35 



.50 
.40 
.55 
.45 
.50 
.35 
.25 
.45 
.45 

.60 
.40 



BACON WRAPPED FILET 
OR CLUB STEAK PLATE 

Tender and juicy — Served with Crispy Hashed Brown 
Potatoes or French Fries — Chilled Salad, choice of 
dressings. Toasted Buttered Bun 1.75 

LARGE TOP SIRLOIN 

Tender and juicy — Served with Crispy Hashed Brown 
Potatoes or French Fries — Chilled Salad, choice of 
dressings. Toasted Buttered Bun _ 2.25 

SPECIAL CHOPPED ROUND STEAK 

Served with Crispy Hashed Brown Potatoes or French 
Fries — Chilled Salad, choice of dressings. Toasted 

Buttered Bun _ 1.50 

Waddle 'N' Special Steak _ 3.00 

ONE HALF FRIED CHICKEN 

French Fries or Hash Browns — Salad — French 

Bread ___ 1.50 

SEAFOOD PLATE 

(Oysters, Shrimp, Crab Roll, Fish) — French Fries or 
Hash Browns — Salad — French Bread _. 1.50 



SHRIMP PLATE 

French Fries or Hash Browns — Salad 
Bread 



• French 



OYSTER PLATE 

French Fries or Hash Browns — Salad — French 
Bread 



PORK CHOP PLATE 

French Fries or Hash Browns — Salad — 
Bread 



French 



1.50 



1.50 



1.25 



DESSERTS 

Fruit and Cream Pies — Home Baked.. 
Ice Cream 

Sundaes - _. 

Malts & Shakes 



.25 

.10 & .20 

_. .25 

25 



THE STEAKBURGER SUPREME 

Made from Select Corn Fed Beef — Ground Fresh Daily 
in our own Kitchen — Served on Large Toasted Bun — 

Pickle or Onion .45 

STEAKBURGER — Economy Size .30 

CHEESEBURGER 

Steakburger with Nippy Natural Cheddar Cheese __ .50 

CHEESEBURGER — Economy Size .35 

STEAKBURGER PLATE 

Hashed Brown or French Fried Potatoes .65 

Breaded Veal Cutlet with Onion Rings, French Fries, or 

Hash Browns, tomatoes, French Bread 1.00 

Footlong Hot Dog 45 & .55 

BEVERAGES 

Fresh Hot Coffee .10 Sweet Milk 

Buttermilk .15 Hot Tea 

Hot Chocolate .15 Coca-Cola 



.15 
.10 
.10 



Waddle N For Pleasure Eating 



Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1964 



Council- 



(Continued from page 7) 

here on October 12, 1964, and 
that the duet of Richard and Jim 
will be on our campus on Decem- 
ber 15, 1964. 

Calbert Marcantel was appointed 
by Blount as chairman of the 
Wednesday night dance commit- 
tee. 

Joe Traigle, chairman of the 
food committee, reported that this 
semester, seniors were given the 
option as to whether or not they 
would buy meal tickets. 

Steve Blount explained that 
since there were no men cheerlead- 
ers he appointed one more fresh- 
man girl cheerleader. The council 
unanimously voted to ratify his 
appointement. 

There being no further bus- 
iness, R. J. Ardoin moved that the 
meeting be adjourned. Seconded 
by Jimmy Berry. Meeting ad- 
journed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Bettie Moore 
APPROVED BY 
PRESIDENT 



Frosh Associates 
File Intention 

Those interested in serving as 
freshmen associates to the Stu- 
dent Council should file a notice 
of intention in Dean Fulton's off- 
ice. Those filing will be interview- 
ed by the Student Council at its 
October 5 meeting. 




Jim Leabo 

"I will give the best student re- 
presentation for the freshman class 
on the Student Council. I will insti- 
tute the basis for unity and coordi- 
nation of the freshman class with 
the student body as a whole." 




RECEIVING THE NSC-LOUISIANA COLLEGE banner 
in post game ceremonies is Steve Blount, student body 
president at NSC. Steve accepted the banner from Betty 
Carter, student body president at Louisiana College. NSC 
will retain possession of the banner until next year when 
it will be given to the winner of the NSC-LC game. 



DON THEATRE 



Now Showing 



A Classic Horror Movie! 

Bone chilli ng. -LIFE MAO. 



aueRtmneY 




Saturday's 
Double Feature 



"TStnahine* 

^wnasfflpeandMelroCOlOR J Wj \ 




•mmes mm 

sum umm 

in ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S 

VERMO 



« MNM KUXl 



Starts Sunday 



Fred MacMurray 
Roily Bergen : 



in 



: Kisses for my : 



* President 

storyof ( ; 



The hilarious 



America's first' 
woman President.., 




and just look 
at the new 
"First Lady"! 



» 




ARLENE DAHL EDWARD ANDREWS 

^ELIWALLACH 

presented by WARNER BROS. 



•nd ROBERT &KAN( 



Register Saturday 

Saturday is the last day to reg- 
ister to be elgible to vote in the 
November 3, presidential election. 
All students are urged to regis- 
ter so that they can have a voice 
in the election. 



Patronize 
Our 
Advertisers 



CANE THEATRE 

Phone 2922 



Now Showing 




no CANE 



Saturday 



Tony Randall 
in 

'THE BRASS BOTTLE' 
PLUS 




Sunday — Tuesday 



.The 



aM-G-M 
1 and Seven Arts 
i Productions presentation 

Sisimm:. ;:::■■!:■■-:: sssisisa; ■ 




Wednesday — Thursday 





, robert 

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AftmAMOUNT BtLf ASt 




A ladies ring was lost Septem- 
ber 26 at Gibson Gulf. If found 
contact Mrs. D. A. Murphy, Rt. 1, 
Many, La. or call 256-5468 collect. 
REWARD. 



CHIEF DRIVE-IN 



NOW SHOWING 



Tony Curtiss 
Christine Kaufmann 

In 

'WILD AND WONDERFUL' 
COLOR 



Saturday's 
Double Feature 



Sean Flynn 

"SON OF 
CAPTAIN BLOOD" 

COLOR 

— Plus— 

'THE MAN WHO SHOT 
LIBERTY VALANCE 

James Stewart 
John Wayne 



Sun.-Mon.-Tues. 



'THE BRIDGE ON THE 
RIVER KWAI" 

William Holden 

Color 



Wednesday 
'BUCK NIGHT' 



Admission — $1.00 per 
car — All persons must 
be inside of car — 

"TAMMY AND 
THE DOCTOR" 

COLOR 
— Plus— 
'YOUNG AND WILLING' 



Coming Soon! 



"PINK PANTHER 
"TOM JONES" 
'LAWRENCE OF ARABIA' 



WELCOME 



FACULTY AND STUDENTS 

EXCHANGE BANK & TRUST COMPANY 

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Ci 
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Welcome Moms And Dads 




urrent 




auce 



VOL. LI— No. 5 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1964 



Group To Perform Monday 




The BRAND YWINE SINGERS will appear at NSC Monday 
night in the Coliseum. The popular all-star group of musi- 
cians and entertainers are currently on tour following a 
series of top school and college engagements. Students 
will be admitted on their ID card. 

Cast, Production Crews Announced 
For The State of the Union 7 Play 



The cast and heads of produc- 
tion crews have been announced 
for the Northwestern State Col- 
lege Davis Players' production, 
"The State of the Union." 

Dr. Edna West, assisted by Judy 
Joiner and stage manager Danny 
Gayer, will direct the presentation 




scheduled for October 20 through 
22 in the Little Theater. 

Characters, in order of appear- 
ance, are Vernon Martin, Gordon 
Parker, Wavelyn Murray, Alan 
Richardson, Celeste Brooks, Cindy 
Smith, James Long, Buddy Dur- 
ham, Lawrence Vickers, Doyle Wil- 
liams, Harvey Wilson, Anne Wea- 
ver, Catherine Wall, Mary Ellen 
Davis, James Narvell, and Sam 
Shelton. 

Andrea Barnett is in charge of 
costumes; Linda Jackson, hand- 
props; Betty Bloch, stage props; 
Doyle Williams, lights; Jim Haw- 
thorne, sound; Susan Hemphill, 
make-up; and Frances Council, 
publicity. 

Students will be admitted by 
Identification Cards. Tickets for 
the generad public are on sale for 
75 cents. 




Linda Bivings 

Currently serving as a majorette 
with the Demon Band this year 
is Linda Bivings. Linda is a soph- 
omore primary education major 
from Shreveport. 



NSC Music Majors 
To Appear On TV 

For the second year, the North- 
western State College Music De- 
partment has been invited by 
KSLA-TV, Channel 12 in Shreve- 
port, to participate in the College 
Music Hall series, Dr. Joseph B. 
Carlucci, department head announ- 
ced. These programs feature in re- 
cital advanced students from col- 
leges in the Ark-La-Tex area. 

The first telecast featuring stu- 
dents from NSC is scheduled for 
1 p.m. Saturday. Performing will 
be two piano majors, Walter Pil- 
cher of Alexandria and Richard 
Smith of Bogue Chitto, Miss. Pil- 
cher graduated from Bolton High 
School and studied piano in Alex- 
andria with Miss Mary Agnes John- 
son. He is now a freshman music 
major at Northwestern and a pupil 
of Dr. Paul Torgrimson. 

Smith is also a freshman music 
major at NSC and a student of 
Miss Eleanor Brown. Before enter- 
ing college, he studied piano with 
Joseph Monroe in Monroe, La. 
Last spring, Smith and Pilcher 
were first and second place win- 
ners, respectively, in the first ann- 
ual NSC Piano Scholarship Com- 
petition. 

Dr. Carlucci will appear briefly 
on Saturday's television program 
as intermission speaker, comment- 
ing on activities in the NSC Music 
Department. 



Mom and Dads Day 
To Be Tomorrow 

"Hats Off to Moms and Dads" - - 
this is the theme of Northwestern 
State College's annual open house 
to the parents Saturday afternoon. 

Parents, having received a spec- 
ial invitation from President Ky- 
ser, will begin the afternoon by 
visiting in the dormitories between 
3:00 and 5:00 p.m. Here they will 
be greeted by the dormitory of- 
ficers in a receiving line and be 
served refreshments. After reg- 
istering in the dormitory of their 
son or daughter they will receive 
name badges and admission tags. 

At 8 p.m. the Moms and Dads 
will be entertained at a football 
game between the Demons and 
Abilene Christian College. Name 
tags will serve as admission tic- 
kets. 



Cecelia Shea To Reign As Queen 
Represents NSC For Third Year 



Potpourri Slates 
Faculty, Student 
Retake Pictures 

The Potpourri office has announ- 
ced that faculty pictures will be 
made October 12 and 13 between 
the hours of 9 a.m. and 12:30 p.m., 
and 1:30 and 5:30 p.m. in the 
Green Room (Studio B) of the 
Fine Arts Auditorium. 

Those students who have failed 
to have their pictures made during 
the week may have them taken 
Monday and Tuesday, at the times 
and place designated for the fa- 
culty. 




Reigning for her third consecu- 
tive year, Queen Cecelia Shea, a 
medical technology major from 
Shreveport, will lead the activities 
of Northwestern State College's 
State Fair Court October 24. 

She and her court will ride in 
the parade and be featured at the 
traditional NSC-Tech football game 
halftime ceremonies in the State 
Fair Stadium. 

The maids are Wilma Hunt, Car- 
olyn Thomas, and Susan Brown 
from Shreveport; Pamela Rushing 
and Nancy Clayton from Natchi- 
toches; Jeannie Marler from Alex- 
andria; and Ann Kovar from Lees- 
ville. 

Cecelia is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. R.E. Shea, 3628 Junior 
PI., Shreveport. 



Associated Women Students Conduct 
Women's Dormitory Elections 



Shreveport Frosh 
Has Journal Award 

Daniel James Gayer, Northwest- 
ern State College freshman from 
Shreveport, is the recipient of the 
"Shreveport Journal" Scholarship, 
according to Dudley G. Fulton, di- 




The Associated Women Students 
of Northwestern State College 
held dormitory elections in the 
women's dormitories October 1. 
The electeons were conducter by 
dormitory advisors wha are A.W.S. 
officers. The results are: 

Agnes Morris: Emily Madden, 
president; Michelene Alletag, vice- 
president; Valentine Gilbert, sec- 
retary-treasurer; Patricia Simpson, 
social chairman; GiGi Tooley, pub- 
licity chairman; Carolyn Brewer, 
dormitory advisor. 

Audubon: Derri Draughn, pre- 
sident; Marie Mayor, vice-presi- 
dent; Royce Thibadeaux, secretary- 
treasurer; Marie Nichols, social 
chairman; Marsha Phillips, pub- 
licity chairman; Lynn Griffin, dor- 
mitory advisor. 

Carondelet: Deborah Hintonr, 
presidents Holly Brown, vice-pre- 
sidentff Euverne Dupree, secre- 
tary-treasurery Carolyn Lee, social 
chairman; Dianna Tate, publicity 
chairman; Betty Sue Dewitt, dor- 
mitory advisor. 

East Caddo: Lola Gay Aiken, 
president: Barbara Pearson, vice- 
president; Judy Richardson, secre- 
tary-treasurer; Nelda Headrick, 
social chairman; Donna Pollard, 
publicity chairmanff Prissy Dor- 



Daniel James Gayer 

rector of student relations. 

Gayer is a 1964 graduate of 
Jesuit High School where he was 
10th in a class of 70. At Jesuit he 
was feature writer and grammar- 
ian for the school paper and was 
a member of the varsity baseball 
and basketball teams. 

At Northwestern he is majoring 
in journalism and English educa- 
tion. The $300 scholarship is 
awarded by the "Shreveport 
Journal" to an outstanding Shreve- 
port student majoring in journal- 
ism. 



Placement Office 
Sets Interviews 

Two major companies will be in 
the Placement Office next week to 
conduct employment interviews. 

Michael Sexton of the Southern 
Service Center for the Army and 
Air Force Exchange Service will 
be here Tuesday to interview Jan- 
uary graduates in the fields of 
business management, business ad- 
ministration, marketing and ac- 
counting. Applicants must be male, 
between the ages of 21 and 30, 
with a military draft status ofex- 
empt. Allinterviews will be of a 
30 minute duration, between the 
hours of 9 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. 

A representative of Schlumber- 
ger Company will conduct inter- 
views Thursday. He will be in the 
Placement Office from 9 a.m. and 
4 p.m. to interview seniors with 
industrial arts, physics and mathe- 
matics backgrounds. 

Appointments may be made with 
Joe W. Webb, director of the place- 
ment service, in room 19, Caldwell 
Hall. 



gan, dormitory advisor. 

East Varnado: Dottie Stone, pre- 
sident; Catherine Wall, vice-pessi- 
dent; Joyce moore, secretary-trea- 
surer; Faith Broussard, social 
chairman; Sandy Sandefur, public- 
ity chairman; Barbara Wallace, 
dormitory advisor. 

Kate Chopin: Becky Fowler, 
president; Darlene Strayn, vice- 
president; Ann Lawson, secretary- 
treasurer; Gayle Ford, social chair- 
man; Mary Felton, publicity chair- 
man; Kate Thibodeaux, dormitory 
advisor, 

Louisiana: Lucille Hart, presi- 
dent, Geraldine Piatt, vice-presi- 
dent; Janet Mott, secretary-trea- 
surer; Judy Young, social chair- 
man; Winona Gallager, publicity 
chairman; Irby McCan, dormitory 
advisor. 

North Natchitoches: Carolyn 
Gamble, president; Joanne Salter, 
vice - president; Wanda Morgan, 
secretary-treasurer; Sandy Litton, 
social chairman; Annie Kelly, pub- 
licity chairman; Lucy Hart, dorm- 
itory advisor. 

South Natchitoches: Sandi Ack- 
erman, president; Bettie Moore, 
vice-president; Vickey Meador, 
secretary-treasurer; Bety Jo Cook, 
social chairman; Patty Shelton, 
publicity chairman; Patricia Sim- 
on, dormitory advisor. 

West Caddo: Nancy Clayton, 
president; Bettye Clegg, vice-presi- 
dent; Ann Mc Williams, secretary 
treasurer; Laura Whatley, social 
chairman; Jackie Caskie, publicity 
chairman; Becky Alphin, dormit- 
ory advisor. 

West Varnado: Michelle Varn- 
ado, president; Juanita Dow, vice- 
president; Sarah Grunwall, sec- 
retary-treasurer; Bonnie Methvin, 
social chairman; Janet Jones, pub- 
licity chairman; Mary Ann Jones, 
dormitory advisor. 



Alpha Beta Alpha 
Schedules Social 

Alpha Beta Alpha, national lib- 
rary science fraternity, will hold a 
social Monday, October 12, at 5:45 
p.m. in room 300 of the Russell 
Library. The theme of the party 
is "Discovering Books." 

All members, pledges, and pros- 
pective members are cordially in- 
vited to attend. The fraternity 
serves as a social group for those 
who are interested in the field of 
library science. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1964 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 
Reactivating 

The Epsilon Upsilon Chapter of 
Tau Kappa Epsilon social frater- 
nity is now reactivating on camp- 
us after almost a year of inactivity. 
The Tekes who were once consid- 
ered the number one fraternity on 
campus had their charter pulled 
last December by international 
headquarters due to the absence of 
organization and progress in the 
chapter. Since then the Tekes have 
been inactive and virtually un- 
known at Northwestern. 

About three weeks ago, a group 
of men, among them members of 
the Blue Key National Honor Fra- 
ternity, Student Council members, 
class officers, and other campus 
leaders saw that something must 
be done. And with the assistance 
of Dean Nichols and the Interfra- 
ternity Council, opened their rush 
season with the other fraternities. 

Although they are comprised of 
only one active member and ap- 
proximately eight others who have 
committed themselves to TKE, 
these men have worked hard and 
are anticipating over a dozen new 
pledges with which to lay a foun- 
dation for their chapter. Inter- 
national representatives have been 
present from time to time, and 
with their help and a lot of hard 
work, TKE will soon see life again. 



Tri-Sigma's 
Now Total 36 

Betty Jo Cook and Linda Doug- 
las were initiated into Sigma Sig- 
ma Sigma Monday night bringing 
the total membership to a total of 
thirty-six. Susan Pace is to be 
initiated at a later date. 

Many interested and exciting e- 
vents took place during rush week 
including a preferential tea for 
rushees held Tuesday night and 
a "Roaring 20's" party held the 
following night. All of the Sigma 
Sigma Sigma girls were present 
in flapper costumes for the Wed- 
nesday night party. A dinner is 
being planned for Bid-Sunday and 
will take place in the home of one 
of the rushees. 



Sigma Sigma Sigma Completes Rush 



The Alpha Zeta Chapter of Sig- 
ma Sigma Sigma began preparat- 
ions for rush early in the summer. 
Workshop was held in Shreveport 
on August 21, 22, 23, and many 
helping hands made it a happy but 
profitable weekend for all Sigmas. 

Five Alpha Zetas who visited Tri 
Sigmas in Hattiesburg at the Uni- 
versity of Southern Mississippi 
were Georgia Blair, Linda Hans- 
ford, Jackie McLamore, Rita Rodg- 
ers, and Melinda Watkins. They, 
along with Tri Sigmas from all 
over Louisiana and Mississippi, 
shared the fun of pre-school rush 
with Alpha Sigma Chapter of Sig- 
ma Sigma Sigma in Hattiesburg. 

Beginning with root beer and 
pretzels followed by R o a ring 
Twenties flapper dresses and 
beads Tri Sigmas ended their rush 
season here in candlelight and 
happiness. OnSeptember 27 the 
following thirty-eight girls were 
pledged to Tri Sigma: Shirley 
Baglio, Pat Bales, Sue Bensey, 
Susie Broussard, Robin Butler, 
Corky Cash, Shirley Kay Dalme. 

Mary Ellen Davis, Linda Fisher, 
Pricilla Fitzgerald, Sylvia Flynn, 
Anita Greer. Sarah Grunwald, 



Biology Society 
Elects Officers 

The Delta Theta Chapter of Beta 
Beta Beta, honorary rjiettfjgical 
society, elected the following 
people to executive positions: 
Dana Roy Sanders, president; 
George Chandler, Vice-president; 
Cathy Cook, secretary; Jackie Sp- 
eir, treasurer; Gayle Stecha, his- 
torian. 

The next meeting of Beta Beta 
Beta will be Thursday, October 
15, at 6:30 p.m. in Williamson 
Hall to discuss business for the 
forthcoming year. All members 
are urged to attend this meeting. 



Americanism Club 
Reactivated 

The NSC Americanism Club is 
now a charter member of the 
"Young Americans for Freedom", 
a national youth organization. If 
interested in joining, contact John 
Woodyard or Dr. Robert Andelson. 



Suzy Hays, Shirley Hutchinson, 
Ginger Kelley, Ann Kovar, Linda 
Lawrence, Linda Lunsford, Jean 
Mills, Kathy Moss, Margie Murphy, 
Sissy Parks, Patty Payne, Marsha 
Phillips, Pam Rushing, Donna Sch- 
eel, Wanda Seger, Jackie Simpson, 
Kay Stevens, Dottie Stone, Janie 
Till, Catherine Wall, Annette Wal- 
lace, Sue Wells, Lucy Wells, Judy 
Wenner. 

Recently welcomed into the 
circle of Sigma sisters on Sept- 
ember 15 were Betty Jo Cook and 
Linda Douglas, and on October5, 
Ann Busenbarrick and Susan Pace. 

On October 8, 9, 10, many mem- 
bers and pledges of Sigma Sigma 
Sigma will meet for the triennial 
regional meet in Lafayette. Ruth 
Richardson, former president of 
Alpha Zeta Chapter and now Na- 
tional Membership Chairman, will 
be there representing the National 
Executive Council. 

What a man of the year the Sig- 
mas have! He's someone always 
there when he's needed with as 
much spirit as any Sigma. The Tri 
Sigmas owe a very special thanks 
to Jolly Gilliam, Man of the Year, 
without whose help rush wouldn't 
have been complete. New pledges 
and Jolly — Tri Sigma salutes you! 




Sigma Kappa Lists 
Pledge Officers 

The pledge class of Sigma Kappa 
sorority elected officers at their 
meeting Monday night. They are 
as follows: Kathy Carmichael, pre- 
sident; Marie Mayer, vice-presi- 
dent; Linda Catanese, secretary; 
Betty Joners, treasurer; Jackie 
Long, activities chairman; Gloria 
Alexander, social chairman; Mic- 
kie Varnado, standards committee 
chairman; Judy McDonough, phil- 
anthrophy chairman; Rita Foley, 
rush chairman; Kay Barnes, schol- 
arship chairman. 



COLONIAL FLOWER SHOPPE 
Welcomes All NSC Students 

SEE US FOR YOUR FLOWERS AND 
COMPLETE FLORAL NEEDS 

422 Second Street 



INVITATIONS 

Wedding 
Fraternal 
Printed or Engraved 



Baker's Printing 
and 
Office Supply 

Phone 2935 
St. Denis St. Natchitoches 



As The Seasons 
Change — Let Us 
Style Your Hair 




Carry You Through 
Your Busy Days 

Call 
Daisy Rachal 
or 

Mrs. Scott 
at 

Delta 
Beauty Salon 

108 Amulet Phone 2951 



Margaret Martin 

Margaret Martin is serving as 
feature twirler for the Demon 
Band this year. She is a trans- 
fer student and is from Winn- 
field. 



Newman Students 
Schedule Classes 

Newman Club, Northwestern 
State College's organization of 
Catholic students, has scheduled 
religious classes Chaplain Father 
O'Brien announced. The classes 
which will be conducted by Father 
O'Brien will meet at 6:30 on the 
evening designated each week. 

On Tuesday evening The Person- 
ality of Christ-a study of Christ as 
He was known and loved by His 
friends; and known and hated by 
his enemies-will begin. 

Basic teachings of the Church, 
intended mainly for interested non- 
Catholics but enlightening for 
many who are already members of 
the Church, is scheduled for Wed- 
nesday evening. 

Thursday evening's lecture will 
be The Church - - as it is and as it 
is supposed to be. 

The Liturgy-the "new" mass and 
new emphasis of layparticipation- 
is the subject of the class Friday 
evening. 



Euthenics Club 
Holds Meeting 

The Euthenics Club of North- 
western State College opened its 
first meeting Thursday night with 
Mary Ann Jones, president, wel- 
coming new members and intro- 
ducing officers. 

Officers gave a preview for the 
coming year of activities and Jean 
Walker concluded the business 
with a report on the state meeting. 



SPECIAL TO COLLEGE STUDENTS 

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1 ... 8x10 .. . Portrait plus 16 wallet size . . . $7.00 
WE DO NOT HAVE A SITTING CHARGE 



UHRBACH'S STUDIO 

(Your Potpourri Photographer) 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 

NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 
Phones — 5556 — 5557 



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Max Factor's Five Famous Make Ups Special Size $1.00 Plus Tax 
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BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 
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PHONE 2386 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 




Page 3 



Pat Pace 
Pat Pace, a freshman from De- 
Quincy, is serving as a major- 
ette with the Demon Band this 
year. 




Gloria Hough 
Gloria Ann Hough is currently 
serving in her second year as 
a majorette with the Demon 
Band. Gloria is a sophomore 
from Winnfield 



Student Council 
Minutes 

The regular meeting of the NSC 
student council was held at 6 p.m. 
Monday, October 5, 1964. In the 
absence of the President, the 
meeting was called to order by 
Stan Branton. 

Patsy Gaspard, Nick DeJean, and 
Calbert Marcantel volunteered to 
work at the Wednesday night 
dance collecting money. 

Marcantel moved that the coun- 
cil accept the "Downbeats" for the 
Victory Dance which will be held 
October 10, after the football game. 
Second by R.J. Ardoin. Motion car- 
ried. 

Run-off elections for freshman 
class officers will be held at the 
student center from 8 a.m. to 7 
p.m. Tuesday, October 6. Members 
of the State Fair Court and the 
queen will also be chosen at this 
time. 

Calbert Marcantel moved that 
the possibility of a girls pep squad 
be investigated. Seconded by Pat- 
sy Gaspard. Motion carried. This 
proposal will be referred to the 
organizations committee. 

Barbara Wallace suggested that 
the council investigate the possibi- 
lity of getting a new American 
flag. R.J. Ardoin and Milton Rhea 
were appointed to look into the 
situation. 

Nick DeJean will investigate the 
possibility of correcting a fire ha- 
zard by way of a fire hydrant in 
front of the Business building. 

All students will be admitted to 
see the Brandywine Singers upon 
presentation of ID cards. 

Barbara Wallace moved that 
the student council accept the five 
students present at the meeting as 
Freshman Associates. Second by 
Milton Rhea. Vote unanimously 
passed by the council. The new 
associates are: Sharman Brumble, 
Bonnie Methvin, Alix Harris, Sar- 
ah Grunwall, and Martha Lou Car- 
roll. 

The question was raised as to 
what was being done about extend- 
ing library hours. Ardoin request- 
ed that the hours be extended on 
Friday and Sunday nights. Bar- 
bara Wallace and Patsy Gaspard 
were appointed to speak to Dean 
Nelken about this situation and 
report back to the council next 
week. 

There being no further busi- 
ness, Wallace moved that the meet- 
ing be adjourned. Seconded by 
Scotty Maxwell. Meeting adjourn- 
ed. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Carolyn Thomas 
Secretary 



LITTLE 

I 



MAN ON CAMPUS 





Women's Dormitory 




Dining Hall 




Men's Dormitory 

Work is scheduled to begin this year on the above new buildings. Bids were submitted 
Thursday on the Women's Dormitory and bids for the Men's Dormitory will be submitted 
on October 20. Work on the new dining hall has been temporarily delayed until the 
State Board of Education can complete their current investigation on it and the new 
Student Union Building. 



"A£ A FK6SH/V1AN, ALICE, YOUVf Pl?C#A0lY NOTlCEP THERE'S 
AH ARJUSTMENT TO $5 MAPE F£OM U&ti 6CHOOL TO COLUZeZ," 




New Equipment In NSC Language Lab 



New electronic equipment was 
installed in the Northwestern 
State College language laboratory 
during the month of August. The 
approximate cost of the new equip- 
ment was $8,000. 

The language laboratory, located 
in Guardia Hall, has fifteen booths. 
It is completely filled each class 
period, and is in use 55 hours per 
week. 

Student helpers, under the su- 
pervision of Mrs. Fern Land, a 



graduate student, control activi- 
ties in the laboratory. 

Each booth consists of a one 
piece earphone-microphone set, 
a taperecorder for the students to 
tape their voices, and an individual 
control panel. As the equipment 
is completely electronic, it is not 
necessary for the students to do 
anything except adjust their head- 
sets when they enter the labora- 
tory. The student helper can con- 
trol each booth individually, or all 
booths at once, from the console. 



Intramural Slate 
Set For Women 

The Women's Recreational As- 
sociation offers women students 
on the Northwestern campus an 
opportunity to participate in rec- 
reational activities. 

First, second and consolation 
awards are made in all individual 
and team events plus the Sweep- 
stakes Award presented to the 
team accruing the most points 
through the year. 

The first event, Volleyball, will 
begin with practices Oct. 12-15 and 
tournament games Oct. 19-Nov. 5. 
Anyone wishing to become a team 
member contact your Dormitory, 
Religious Club or Sorority repre- 
sentative or Miss Andrea Farrow, 
W.R.A. Director, in the Women's 
Gym. 



Current Sauce 



ESTABLISHED 1914 



Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
scription $3 the year payable in advance. 



Member of the Associated CoUegiate Press 



Duffy Wall Editor-in-Chief 

Sharon Hillman Associate Editor 

Linda Weber News Editor 

Jerry Brill Sports Editor 

Jean Wall Society Editor 

John Lewis Business Manager 

Linda Broughton .... Advertising Manager 

Jon Gibson Staff Artist 

Roy G. Clark Faculty Adviser 

Editorial Staff: Linda Weber, Rusty Sav- 
age, Jerry Brill, Mary Ellen Davis, Rusty 
Savage, Gene Couvillion, Robert Durr, 
Max Duggan, Walley Hebert. 



Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not reflect 
the opinions of the student body or the 
administration and faculty of the college. 



The Current Sauce prints the news im- 
partially. It supports what it believes to 
be right, and opposes what it believes to 
be wrcng, regardless. 



:v.i; , v»'aaf*: 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1964 



From The 
Sports Desk 

By Jerry Brill 

As many people know by now, 
Northwestern State College ranks 
in the top ten in the nation among 
small colleges. They have shown 
that they belong up there as they 
have knocked off three foes this 
season, two of them by wide mar- 
gins, and none of them being con- 
sidered as pushovers. The differ- 
ence in this year seems to be the 
top physical condition that these 
players are in and also their agres- 
siveness. Let us do our part and 
give this football team all the sup- 
port we can give them and lead 
them on to an undefeated season. 

In looking at the records, we see 
that the leading scorer for the De- 
mons is Jimmy Scott. It was also 
noted that Jimmy has probably 
played less time than anyone on 
the team, a matter of less than a 
minute. He has been a valuable 
asset though as he has kicked seven 
extra points and two field goals 
for a total of 13 points. 

The NSC football squad has 
something to look forward to every 
time that they win a game. The 
first thing is that they do not have 
to check in until Monday. On Mon- 
day, all they do is have a light 
workout and then watch films of 
their next opponent. While they 
are watching the films, they are 
given malts compliments of Coach 
Clayton. If they lose a game, they 
must check in on Sunday and then 
have a rough workout Monday. The 
results so far, three malts for each 
player. 

Last week this column had 
plenty of luck as it came out with 
seven right and none wrong in its 
predictions. That gives an average 
of 1.000, a perfect way to start out. 
I hope I can have that kind of luck 
this time so here goes with another 
try: 

NSC (3) over Abilene Christian- 
Winner will be the team with the 
most breaks. Could be a chance 
for the Demons to up their na- 
tional rating. 

La. Tech (14) over Southwestern- 
Tech keeps unblemished in the 
Battle of the Bulldogs. 

McNeese (13) over the University 
of Tampa — Cowboys are hurt but 
they should be riding high for 
this one. 

Howard (20) over Northeast— 
Indians will really have to be on 
the warpath if they are to take 
this one. 

La. College (6) over Southeastern- 
Wildcats should tree the Lions. 

LSU (14) over North Carolina — 
Chalk up another one for the 
Fighting Tigers. 

Ole Miss (10) over Florida — Sting 
of defeat still felt by the Rebels. 

Arkansas (24) over Baylor — Razor- 
backs bop big bad Baylor Bears. 

Alabama (28) over North Carolina 
State— Southern teams continue 
to roll. 

Texas (24) over Oklahoma — Little 
trouble expected for Texas. 



Demons To Face Abilene Christian; 
Sternest Test Of The Year 



Northwestern State College's 
undefeated Demons will face a 
stern test this week as they play 
host to powerful Abilene Christian. 
The Wildcats have a squad con- 
sisting of 20 returning lettermen 
who ran up a string of 10 straight 
victories before falling to power- 
ful Lamar Tech, their only loss 
for this 1964 campaign. So far 
their record stands at three wins 
and one loss. 

In last year's game, the Wild- 
cats showed a balanced offense, 
combining running and timely 
passing to wreck the Demons. NSC 
had a few bright moments, parti- 
cularly with passing, but they 
couldn't hold the Cats. The final 
score was ACC 28, NSC 18. 

NSC has shown a very tough 
defense this year as they have 
given up only 259 yards rushing 
and 326 yards passing in three ball 
games. On the other hand, the 
Demons have shown a powerful 



offense as they have picked up 
625 yards rushing and 387 yards 
passing. The Demons have scored 
a total of 77 points while giving 
up 32. 

Leading ground gainer for the 
Demons is halfback James Ay- 
mond. He has carried the ball 17 
times for a total of 170 net yards 
gained and a 10 yard average. 

Leading passers for NSC is 
quarterback Donnie Carrol. Don- 
nie has thrown the ball 31 times 
and has completed 18 for 246 
yards and two TD's. Leading re- 
ceiver is Al Dodd who has hauled 
in six passes for 83 yards and one 
TD. Dodd is tied with Richard Bur- 
litz for most interceptions. 

Handling the punting chores for 
the Demons is Wayne Walker who 
has booted the ball six times for 
220 yards and an average of 36.5 
yards per kick. 

Game time at Demon Stadium 
will be 8:00 p.m. 



Northwestern State College 
1964 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 



Oct. 10 
Oct. 17 
Oct. 24 
Nov. 7 
Nov. 14 
Nov. 21 



Abilene Christian 
Ouachita Baptist 
Louisiana Tech 
McNeese State 
Southwestern Louisiana 
Southeastern 



Home 

Arkadelphia 
Shreveport 
Lake Charles 
Home* 
Home 



The Southwestern game will be N.S.C.'s homecoming game, 
played at 2 p.m. on that date. All 1 other games will be held 
at 8 p.m. 



COMMUNITY 
CLEANERS 

Specialists In Nations 
Finest Dry Cleaning 

Professional Shirt 
Laundry 

Phone 2229 
103 Second Street 



THE 

BLOSSOM SHOP 

Is The Place To Stop 
For All Your Flower 
Needs. 



Order Today Your 
Football Corsages For 
MON ADAD'S Day 

And Homecoming. 

917 Washington Ph. 6677 



GLOVER GIFT SHOP 

459 JEFFERSON 

GIFTS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Welcome NSC Students 
And Mom & Dad 

WELCOME TO BROWSE 




JAMES AYMOJND (42) rides nign as ne nurcues over 
Claude Patrick (33). The Demons trounced Northeast 27-6. 



LADIES LONG COATS WITH NATURAL 
RANCH MINK COLLARS— ONLY $20:00 EACH 
Others Priced from $10 up 

MEN'S SWEAT SHIRTS AND LONG SLEEVE 
SPORT SHIRTS IN ASSORTED COLORS— YOUR 
CHOICE— $1 each 

LARGE SIZE BATH TOWELS— 2 for $1 

BLANKETS FOR SINGLE AND DOUBLE 
BEDS ONLY $2 EACH 

You'll find these and other outstanding 
values at BILL'S this weekend 

SHOP WITH US— YOU'LL BE GLAD YOU DID 



BILL'S DOLLAR STORE 



768 Front St. 



Phone 9475 




NSC STUDENTS: 

Why not assure that the next visit of parents or friends 
is a memorable one in all respects? You can do this by 
making reservations with the El Camino Real Motel. The 
homey atmosphere, attractive decor, and comfortable ap- 
pointments of El Camino is surpassed only by the courteous 
service that you will find there. The El Camino Restaurant 
adjoins. 

£1 Gamut* Real MOTEL 



i.' i . 



HIGHWAY 6 WEST 



Mr i.- 



PHONE 4426 



4 » n J 1 vi 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 




Page S 



THREE REASONS WHY Northwestern State College 
ranks in the top ten in the nation of small colleges are 
pictured above. They are, left to right, Allen Plummer, 
guard, Claude Patrick, fullback, and Grover Colvin, guard. 
All are slated to see plenty of action this Saturday night 
against the Abilene Christian Wildcats. 



Intramural Schedule 1964-65 



Touch Football 
Table Tennis 
Bowling 

Volleyball 

Cross Country 

Gymnastics 

Badminton 

Paddleball 

Basketball 

Free Throw 

Tennis 

Softball 

Track and Field 
Swimming 

The Intramural 



ENTRY DEADLINE 
October 1 
October 20 
October 26 

October 29 
November 16 
January 11 
February 8 
February 15 
March 1 
March 29 
April 26 
April 26 
May 10 
May 17 
Jamboree will be held on 



PLAY BEGINS 
October 8 
October 28 
Determined by 

Bowling Alley 
November 9 
November 19 
January 14 
February 11 
February 18 
March 4 
April 1 
April 29 
April 29 
May 13 
May 20 
October 6 





'6r 



f 

Nugent Receives 
Stcgg Award 

Northwestern State College's 
27-6 win over the Northeast Indians 
last Saturday listed 16 players who 
made the team's honor roll. 

The top player of the game who 
was given the Alonzo Stagg Award 
ir. Lawrence Nugent of Bastrop. 
Lawrence was elected to both the 
offensive and defensive honor roll. 
Tackle Ross Gwinn and halfback 
Al Dodd were also named to both 
lists. 

Other players who made the of- 
fensive honor roll were Dick Red- 
ing, Grover Colvin, Fred Fulton, 
Monty Ledbetter, Louis Richard, 
Don Beasley, Donnie Carroll, Har- 
old Petrie, Hubert Adams, and 
Gary Pittman. Those making the 
honor roll on defense were: Ed 
Horton, James Aymond, and Cor- 
wyn Aldredge. 



Recreational Play 
Schedule Slated 

The Men's Gym of Northwestern 
State College has announced their 
schedule for the 1964 fall semes- 
ter. The intramural office will be 
open from 4- 8 p.m. on Monday 
[through Friday and from 1:30- 
4:00 p.m. on Saturdays and Sun- 
days. 

Recreational play in the men's 
gym will be as follows: 

Monday: 4-8, basketball and rec- 
reational play. 

Tuesday: 2:30-8:00, badminton. 

Wednesday: 4:00-8:00, basket- 
ball and recreational play. 

Thursday: 2:30-6:00, basketball 
and recreational play; 6:00-10:00, 
badminton. 

Friday: 4:00-8:00, basketball 
and recreational play. 

Saturday and Sunday: 1:30-4:00, 
basketball and recreational play. 

Paddleball and weight lifting 
will be from 3:30-8:00 Monday 
through Friday and from 1:30-4:00 
on Saturday and Sunday. 




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NSC Demons Roll Past NLSC Indians; 
Remain Undefeated After Three Games 

By Kenneth Baker 
Sauce Sports Writer 

Northwestern State's Demons continued to dominate their 
opposition Saturday night as quarterbacks Donnie Carrol and 
Don Beasley and kicking specialist Jimmy Scott led the De- 
mons to a 27-6 victory over the 
Northeast State Indians. NSC now 
holds a perfect 3-0 record and is 
tied for the top spot in the Gulf 
States Conference standings. 

Carroll hit eight of 14 passes for 
106 yards while Beasley completed 
five of nine passes for 63 yards 
and a touchdown. The talented toe 
of Jimmy Scott provided field 
goals of 28 and 34 yards in addi- 
tion to three extra points. 

The Indians could manage only 
eight first downs in the contest as 
the rugged Demon line led by 
Lawrence Nugent, Grover Colvin, 
Louis Richard, and Monty Led- 
better held the tribe to 70 yards 
on the ground. NSC enjoyed it's 
most productive game of the sea- 
son as the Demons amassed a total 
of 22 first downs on 188 yards rush- 
ing and 169 yards passing. 

Scoring 

In the first half of the game, all 
of the scoring took place in the 
first quarter. The first time the 
Demons got possession of the ball, 
Beasley took them on a 70 yard 
scoring drive in 12 plays. After 



being held for one play at the one 
yard line by the Indians, Ed Hor- 
ton took Beasley's handoff and 
dove over for the first touchdown. 
Jimmy Scott's kick for the PAT 
made the score 7-0 with only six 
minutes gone in the game. 

It didn't take long for the In- 
dians to bounce right back. Wayne 
Walker kicked off for Northwest- 
ern, and R. F. Wilson caught the 
ball on the Northeast 7-yard line. 
Wilson started up the middle and 
broke for the left sideline where 
he was met by two Demon linemen. 
The fleet-footed halfback evaded 
the pair and raced untouched into 
the end zone for a 93 yard return. 
The attempt for the extra point 
failed but the Demon lead was cut 
to one point. 

Dave Gleason's running and Don- 
nie Carroll's passing provided the 
punch for another NSC rally late 
in the first quarter, but it came 
to a halt at the Northeast 24-yard 
line. 

Jimmy Scott was then called in 
to attempt a field goal. The ball 
(See Demons Roll, p. 8) 



PENNYLAND 

1300 Washington Across From Peoples Motor Co. 

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 
8 A.M. -12 P.M. 

Free Transportation To And From 
The College - 8 A.M. - 7 P.M. 

SIX POOL TABLES 
(Brunswick, Gold Crown) 

TWO SNOOKER TABLES 
(Brunswick, Gold Crown) 

Shuffle Board - Domino Tables 
Moon Tables - Bowling Tables 
Shooting Gallery 

SNACK BAR -AIR CONDITIONED 

ENTERTAINMENT FOR ALL 
MEN - LADIES - CHILDREN 

This Weekend Only! NSC Women 

Students Can Play Free With 
Husband Or Boyfriend-Only Male 
Students Pay 



For Fun - Relaxation - Pleasure 
Visit PENNYLAND 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAJCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1964 



Math Department 
To Offer Fortran 
Programming Class 

The Department of Mathematics 
at Northwesteern State College 
will offer a short non-credit course 
in FORTRAN Programming dur- 
ing the fall semester. 

FORTRAN is a programming sy- 
stem for digital computors that was 
developed primarily for use in 
scientific and engineering areas. 
The purpose of a FORTRAN sy- 
stem is to simplify programming 
of a digital computor by allowing 
the programmer to state in a rel- 
atively simple language, closely re- 
sembling that of ordinary algebra, 
the steps of a procedure to be car- 
ried out for the solution of a prob- 
lem. 

The course will consist of six 
three hour lectures and some lab- 
oratory work. The first class will 
meet Monday night, October 19, 
from seven until ten in room 20 in 
Caldwell Hall. If a better time 
exists for the persons interested 
in taking the course, an effort will 
be made to determine it at the in- 
itial meeting. No knowledge of 
mathematics above algebra will be 
needed for this course and as no 
grades will be given, there will be 
no tests or written work required. 
A charge of approximately one dol- 
lar for a manual and other needed 
materials will be the only expense 
that a student will incur in this 
course. 

Beginning on October 19, the 
course will end on November 23. 
All members of the academic and 
business community are encourag- 
ed to take advantage of this oppor- 
tunity to learn how to program 
high speed digital computers. An 
invitation to attend this course is 
also extended to all interested re- 
sidents of Natchitoches and the 
surrounding areas. 

Inquiries about the course 
should be directed to Assistant 
Professor Bobby R. Waldron, who 
will conduct the course. He can be 
reached by mail in care of the NSC 
Mathematics Department, or by 
phone at 5571, extension 446. 



I A Club Members 
Hear Dr. Robinson 

Dr. Walter Robinson, head of 
the department of Industrial Edu- 
cation, was the featured speaker at 
the regular monthly meeting of 
the Northwestern State College 
Industrial Arts Club held in the 
Industrial Arts building October 1. 

Dr Robinson welcomed new 
members and gave a brief history 
of the club. He stressed the im- 
portance of students participating 
in extra curricular activities while 
in college. He stated it is impor- 
tant to cultivate our intellectual 
"powers", but it is also important 
to learn how to live with people. 

Club projects for the year were 
discussed. Programs for the year 
will consist of representatives from 
industry and education speaking 
before the group. 

Officers of the club for this 
year are: Horace Johnson, Jr., 
president; Johnny Valentine, vice 
president; Alvin Wendt, treasurer; 
Glen Johnson, secretary; and 
Lloyd Price, parliamentarian. 



Demeters Discuss 
Plans For Year 

Demeter, Northwestern State 
College's club for agriculture ma- 
jors met this week to discuss plans 
for activities during the fall se- 
mester. 

The first activity planned is a 
combination weiner roast-hayride 
within the next two weeks. The 
main project this year concerns 
the Demeter barge from the Old 
South River Parade. The barge was 
given to Demeter from several ag- 
ricultural businesses. 

Demeter is presently conducting 
a membership drive. Anyone who 
has a C average in six hours of ag- 
riculture courses is invited to join. 
If interested, one may contact Dr. 
Ralph Fell or Mr. Melvin Stevens 
of the agriculture department. 

Officers for the year are Clif- 
ford Krouse, president; Lonnie 
Hughes, vice-president; Paula 
Smith, secretary; Jimmy Hughes, 
treasurer; Jerry Kemp, reporter; 
and O.H. Haynes, parliamentarian. 



WRECK TECH Sweat Shirts 

AND THE COMPLETE 

Monarch Outline Series Are In 

If The College Bookstore Does 
Not Have It We'll Get It. 

BAKER'S BOOK STORE 

Next to LeRendezvous 
'NSC's Favorite Bookstore' 




THE FINEST, MOST 
SATISFYING MEALS 
ARE FOUND AT 

Le Rendezvous 

113 Second St. 




"Specializing In 
Hair Shaping" 

TRESSIES 
Beauty Salon 

For Appointments 

Call 4336 And Visit 

Tressie Watts 
Elsie Hernandez 
Irma Courtney 
Jean Boucher 



Biology Students 
Visit Reservation; 
Collect Specimens 

Three biology students - - - 
Jackie Speir, Gary Stahlhuth, and 
Carol Ann Knotts - - - recently ac- 
companied Dr. Earle Cross on a 9- 
day field trip to the Arapahoe-Sho- 
shone Indian Reservation in cen- 
tral Wyoming. 

Purpose of the trip was to col- 
lect mites and bacteria associated 
with an important native pollina- 
tor of alfalfa, the alkali-bee. These 
organisms are subjects of inves- 
tigation under a $25,560 grant re- 
cently awarded by the National 
Institutes of Health to the Depart- 
ments of Biological Sciences and 
Microbiology. 

The group left Natchitoches on 
September 9 and took a route 
through Texas, New Mexico, Col- 
orado, and Wyoming. Collecting 
late summer insects, largely bees, 
proved to be a fruitful sideline. 
The return route passed through 
Wyoming's Wind River Mountains 
and through the heart of the Rocky 
Mountains. The latter portion of 
the trip was made in rain which 
became snow at higher elevations. 
Game was abundant and many 
mule deer, antelope, and a moose 
were seen. 



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Wanda Radford 

Serving as head majorette this 
year for the Demon Band is 
Wanda Radford. Wanda is a 
junior music major from 
Mansfield. 



AWS Conducts 
Monthly Meeting 

The Associated Women Students 
of Northwestern State College held 
their first monthly meeting on 
Monday at 8:00 p.m. in Caddo Hall. 

Present were Mrs. Hendrick, 
dean of women, Miss Huckaby, as- 
sistant dean of women, the house 
directors and the Greater A.W.S. 
Council. Various committee reports 
were given by the A.W.S. officers. 

These reports were followed by 
the showing of slides which Miss 
Huckaby took on her vacation in 
Europe. The meeting was then ad- 
journed and refreshments were 
served. 



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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 



Bauer To Address 
Methodist Group 

Dr. Richard H. Bauer, executive 
secretary, Interboard Committee 
on Christian Vocations, The Board 
of Education of the Methodist 
Church, will be a guest of the 
Wesley Foundation at Northwest- 
ern State College on October 9 and 
10. 

Dr. Bauer's main responsibility 
is to develop plans and correlate 
efforts toward enlistment and 
guidance of persons into church- 
related tnd other occupations for 
the entire Methodist Church. 

While at NSC, Dr. Bauer will 
visit with students who are in- 
terested in some type of church- 
related vocation and will address 
a group of students at an informal 
supper meeting at 6:30 p.m. on 
October 9 in the Wesley Founda- 
tion Building. 

Sunday morning at 10 a.m., Dr. 
Bauer will speak to the combined 
adult church school classes in the 
First Methodist Church Sanctuary. 

Dr. Bauer received his education 
at the University of Cincinnati, 
Garrett Biblical Institute in Evan- 
son, Illinois, and Ohio Northern 
University. He came to his present 
position in 1960 from the Ohio 
Conference where he was superin- 
tendent of the Portsmouth Dis- 
trict. Prior to 1956, when he be- 
came district superintendent, he 
had served pastorates in Indiana 
and Ohio. Before entering the 
ministry, he was for 10 years a 
purchasing agent for Proctor and 
Gamble in Cincinnati. 

Dr. Bauer holds membership in 
American Personnel and Guidance 
Association, Sigma Chi, and Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa. 



OTS Club To Meet; 
Open To Everyone 

The Northwestern State College 
Officer Training School Club will 
hold its regular meeting on Octo- 
ber 12 in the 'N Room' of the Col- 
iseum at 7 p.m. 

All sophomores, juniors, sen- 
iors, and graduates are eligible for 
membership and their attendance 
is solicited. The OTS Club is pri- 
marily for those college students 
both male and female who may be 
interested in obtaining a commiss- 
ion in the United States Air 
Force. 

Anyone interested in learning 
about the club is cordially invited 
to attend the meeting as a visitor. 
Election of new officers will be 
included in the regular business. 

For more information call Sgt. 
DeArmond in Alexandria, collect 
at 445-6511, extension 66. 



Cocharan Boots Wanted 

Anyone having a pair of Cocha- 
ran jump boots which they wish to 
sell please contact Tommy Put- 
nam, 437 Bossier Hall, phone 480 
or 489. 



WESLEY 
Foundation 

SUNDAY 

9:00 A.M.— Coffee 
9:30 A.M.— Forum 
6:00 P.M.— Bible Study 

WEDNESDAY 

5:00 P.M. — Supper 
5:45 P.M. — Program & Wor- 
ship 

FRIDAY 

7:30 A.M. — Morning Vespers 

OFFICE HOURS 

10:00 A.M.— 12 Noon 
1:00 P.M.— 2:30 P.M. 




Spier Phillips 

Speir, Phillips Get Scholarships 
By Louisiana Land And Exploration 

Two Northwestern State College students, Jackie Roy 
Speir and James Wilbur Phillips, Jr., are recipients of two 
$500 scholarships offered by the Louisiana Land and Explora- 
tion Co. for the 1964-65 academic 
year, according to Dudley G. Ful- 
ton, director of Student Relations. 

Speir, a junior wildlife manage- 
ment major from Chestnut, is a 
1961 graduate of Reidhimer High 
School. While at NSC he received 
an appointment as undergraduate 
research participant in biology — 
bacteriology program sponsored by 
the National Science Foundation. 
In this program he conducted re- 
search in plant ecology with em- 
phasis on the construction and cor* 
relation of vegetation and soil 
maps of the Well Woods. 

Phillips is a senior from Boyce 
and an accounting major. He is a 
member of Blue Key, men's honor 
fraternity, and Pi Omega Pi, na- 



tional business honor fraternity. 
He also spent a summer in Oregon 
and Washington as a summer mis- 
sion worker sponsored by the Home 
Mission Board of the Southern 
Baptist Convention. 



Newman Center 
Plans Social 

An informal social will be held 
October 17, at 7:00 p.m. in the St. 
Thomas Acquinas Newman Center 
on Second Street. Newman Apos- 
talate Social Chairman, Jim Sako- 
vitich, invites all NSC students in 
for an evening of records, coffee, 
and donuts. 



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Biological Sciences Department Gets 
National Institute of Health Grant 



Northwestern State College's 
Departments of Biological Sciences 
and Microbiology have received a 
research grant totaling $25,560 
from the National Institute of 
Health. The grant, entitled "Some 
Species Interrelationships in a Bee 
Cell Microhabitat" is expected to 
run for three years. Dr. Earle A. 
Cross of the Department of Bio- 
logical Sciences is principal inves- 
tigator and Dr. Rene J. Bienvenu 
of the Department of .the Depart- 
ment of Microbiology is co-inves- 
tigator. 

Studies will center around in- 
terrelationships of two species of 
mites, at least one kind of bacil- 
lus, and a ground-nesting bee. The 
latter, Nomia me\anderi is the al- 
kali-bee, one of the most impor- 
tant pollinators of alfalfa in the 
United States. Numbers of this bee 
have recently dwindled greatly in 
some areas, causing a correspond- 
ing drop in seed yields. Causes of 
this decline are unknown but may 
be due to a bee disease which is 
prevalent in the areas of decline. 
It is possible that the two mites 
mentioned may be instrumental in 
spreading this disease. 

The Department of Biological 
Sciences has also received an Un- 
dergraduate Instructional Scienti- 
fic Equipment Grant from the 



National Science Foundation. The 
amount received was matched by 
NSC, giving a total sum of 310,620. 
Items purchased with the funds 
from this grant are designed to in- 
itiate teaching areas in plant phy- 
siology and plant pathology, and 
to expand teaching efforts and to 
broaden student research interest 
in the field of environmental bio- 
logy. Also the Department has re- 
ceived from an institutional grant 
supplied by the National Science 
Foundation $3,930, which will be 
used to purchase equipment de- 
signed to further improve the in- 
structional and research programs 
in biology. 

Recently the State Board of Edu- 
cation approved the setting aside 
of an 84 acre tract of woodland as 
a natural history area. This tract 
which is called the Northwestern 
State College Natural History Re- 
servation, is located on the north- 
east corner of the campus ap- 
proximately one mile from the Bio- 
logy Building. The vegetation of 
the area is shortleaf-loblolly mix- 
ed hardwoods, but has a variety of 
habitats including a fine beech ra- 
vine and several acres of cypress 
swamp. Plans are underway to 
build a research laboratory on the 
Reservation. 



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Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1964 



NSC Athlete Practices Clipping, 
Strives To Do Better Every Week 



A welcome addition to NSC's 
football squad this season is tackle 
George Cognevich, unique in that, 
while he may be penalized for 
clipping on the gridiron, like ac- 
tivities meet with everyone's ap- 
proval in the Student Center bar- 
bershop. 

George, a licensed barber, at- 
tends classes in the mornings, 
works in the barbershop in the 
early afternoon, reports for foot- 
ball practice in the late afternoon, 
and assists his wife, Marlene, with 
household chores in the early even- 
ing before getting down to his 
nightly studies. It's quite a rou- 
tine. 

Cognevich is from Venice down 
in South Louisiana. He was a top 
athlete at Buras High School, par- 

DetTIOnS Roll- 
Continued from p. 5) 
was placed on the 34 and Scott's 
kick split the uprights for a three- 
pointer. 

Defensive Battle 

The second quarter proved to be 
only a defensive battle in which 
neither team scored, and the De- 
mons led 10-6 at the halfway point. 

In the early part of the third 
quarter, the Indians started to 
move with quarterback Johnny 
Garrison leading the way from 
their own 20. Garrison had his 
team moving well until NSC guard 
Lawrence Nugent recovered a fum- 
ble at the Indian 34. 

Again Beasley went to work, 
moving down field with four run- 
ning plays and completing two 
passes for six yards each, the lat- 
ter going for a touchdown to Dick 
Reding who was waiting all by him- 
self in the end zone. Scott added 
the extra point again. 

The playing field was slightly 
damp towards the end of the third 
quarter, but it failed to slow up 
NSC's attack as Carroll returned 
to lead the Demons on a 53 yard 
march and their final touchdown 
of the game. Donnie completed 
three passes in the drive but had 
to stick to the ground for the fi- 
nal two with Petrie plunging in for 
the score. Scott provided the PAT. 

Scott also ended the scoring for 
the night with a 28 yard boot and 
the score stood 27-6. 
Score by quarters: 

Northwestern 10 7 10-27 

Northeast _ 6 0-6 



ticipating in football and track un- 
til graduation in 1958. After grad- 
uation he attended Southeastern a 
year before entering Army service. 

He was in Ordinance in Ger- 
many and played football two 
years in the European League, 
which comprised some 10 or 11 
teams playing major cities. 

Following his army service, Cog- 
nevich worked as a roughneck and 
financed his barber school educa- 
tion. Realizing that he needed to 
continue work on his college de- 
gree, he enrolled at Northwestern 
this fall. 

Not having played in three years, 
Cognevich feels he hasn't reached 
his top playing condition. NSC 
coaches believe he is going to de- 
velop into a fine lineman. 

Cognevich is enrolled in the Up- 
per Elementary Education pro- 
gram and wants to be a teacher af- 
ter graduation. His minor is 
French. At Buras he was captain 
of the football team, a senior class 
vice-president, and president of 
the French club and Future Busi- 
ness Leaders of America group. 

His hobby, when he finds time 
for it, is leathercraft. 

Northwestern coaches, however, 
hope that his gridiron "hobby" 
will be opening big holes in oppos- 
ing lines for Demon ball carriers. 
Cognevich is a member of the Pur- 
ple offensive unit. 



Prudhomme Elects 
Dormitory Council 

The dormitory council of Prud- 
homme Hall elected officers for 
the coming year Tuesday night. 
Plans were also made for MOM 
AND DAD'S DAY, and Mrs. Ruth 
Weber, house director, announced 
that this year's theme will be 
"Hats off to Mom and Dad." 

Officers for the coming year are : 
Gary Johnson, president, Herman 
Albritton, vice-president, and Da- 
vid Carter, secretary. These three, 
along with three other members 
of the Council, Tommy Harwell, 
Wayne Meachum, and Gerald Hunt, 
constitute Prudhomme's delega- 
tion to the Associated Men Stu- 
dents. Those members to the Coun- 
cil other than those mentioned a- 
bove are: Ed Bryan, Dewey Dou- 
say, William Brasher, Richard 
Spears, and Robert Vincent. 



Treat Mom & Dad To The 
Best Food In Town At The 

WADDLE 'N GRILL 

HWY. 1 SOUTH PH. 4949 



Pledges Welcomed 
By Delta Zeta 

Epsilon Beta Chapter of Delta 
Zeta has welcomed the following 
new pledges: Freda Allday, Rita 
Allen, Lynda Aycock, Donna Bate- 
man, Peggy Best, Holly Brown, 
Susie Brown, Priscilla Carlson, 
Margaret Carroll, Wanda Cazaubon 
Ann Cleveland, Linda Coker, Judy 
Cummings, Karen Eatman, Janie 
Ebey, Carol Geisler. 

Debbie Hinton, Cora Jacobs, 
Sandra King, Carolyn Lee, Mari- 
lyn Lockhart, Lynn McCormick, 
Margaret McKay, Linda McLelland, 
Jo Ann Magee, Connie Ports, El- 
len Prudhomme, Pat Quin, Linda 
Rue, Pat Shea, Sandra Stevens, 
Libby Stinson, Rose Suckow, Su- 
sie Thompson, Delores Tiller, Che- 
ryl Wicker, Wanda Valentine, and 
Grace Wilson. 

Congratulations go to Susie 
Brown, Sandy Corkern, Cecelia 
Shea, Pat Shea, and Carolyn Tho- 
mas who have had their names 
placed on the State Fair Court bal- 
lot. 

Delta Zetas who have been elect- 
ed dormitory officers are Debbie 
Hinton, Holly Brown, Carolyn Lee, 



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Kappa Delta Phi 
Schedules Meeting 

The first meeting of Kappa Del- 
ta Phi will be held Monday, Octo- 
ber 12, at 6:30 p.m. in the Home 
Economics living room. All mem- 
bers are urged to attend as a vice- 
president will be elected at this 
meeting. The officers for the com- 
ing year are: Sue Gaskin, presi- 
dent; Sue Chance, secretary; Cat- 
hy Cook, historian-reporter. 



Sandy Litton, and Judy Richard- 
son. 

Mom and Dad's Day Saturday 
will be a big event for the Delta 
Zetas. Plans have been made for a 
banquet at the country club for the 
sorority members and their par. 
ents. A slumber party will be held 
for Delta Zetas after the football 
game Saturday night. 



CHIEF DRIVE-IN 



Now Showing 



Cliff Robertson 
In 

'633 SQUADRON' 
Color 



Saturday's 
Double Feature 



Jane Fonda 

"IN THE COOL 
OF THE DAY" 

Color 
—Plus- 
Van Heflin 

"FIVE BRANDED 
WOMEN" 



Sun.-Mon.-Tues. 



See It Twice! 

David Niven 
Peter Sellers 
Capucine 

'THE PINK PANTHER' 

Color 



Wednesday 
'BUCK NIGHT' 



Kerwin Mathews 
"THE MANIAC" 

—Plus- 
Rock Hudson 

"A GATHERING 
OF EAGLES" 

Color 



DON 
Theatre 

BOX OFFICE OPENS 

Mon.-Fri 5:45 

Sat. & Sun. 12:45 



NOW SHOWING 



NEWMAN 




Saturday's 
Double Feature 



-Bob's on the road to paterrity- 
BobHope a„, /j^Th? 




PLUS 



a COLUMBIA PICTURES: 
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AUDIE 
MURPHY 



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Sun.-Mon. Tues. 



ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S 



MARNIE. 



Staffing 



JIPPI'HEDREN 
SEAN CANNERY 

co-starting 

DIANE BAKER- MARTIN GABEL 

TECHNICOLOR* 




COMING SOON! 



Connie Francis 
'LOOKING FOR LOVE' 



Tab Hunter 
RIDE THE WILD SURF' 



NSC STUDENT CHECKING ACCOUNT 
20 PERSONALIZED CHECKS & SERVICE CHARGE FOR $2.00 

GET DEMON EMBLEMED CHECKS AND COVERS AT 



THE PEOPLES BANK AND TRUST CO. 

120 Church Street 




urrent 




auce 



VOL. LI— No. 6 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1964 




REIGNING QUEEN FOR the third consecutive year, 
Cecelia Shea will lead the Northwestern State College 
State Fair Court in the pre-game ceremonies at the annual 
NSC-Tech game in Shreveport Saturday. From left to 
right are Miss Shea, maids Jeanie Marler, Ann Kovar, 
Nancy Clayton, Pam Rushing, Sarah Brown, Wilma Hunt, 
Linda Hansford, and Carolyn Thomas. 



Foreign Students 
Increase To 40 

Forty foreign students have en- 
rolled for the fall semester at Nor- 
thwestern State College. They are 
Egnio Azarias from Nicargua; Hans 
Anold Altofer from Switzerland; 
Nancy Au, Charles K. S. Chiu, Al- 
bert Chuck-ping Chu, and Lynn Yao 
from Hong Kong. 

Carl Ronald Buchanan and David 
Ralph Webster from Canada; Au- 
relio Eduardo Cantt, Oscar Feb- 
res, and Eduardo Scavino from 
Peru; Taylor Tai-lei Chen, Kou- 
chang Liu, Foch Tsai, Tsu-Lin 
Tung, Yeih-pin Wan, and Ching- 
hua Yang from Formosa; Jai Soo 
Choi and Jae Do Yang from Korea. 

Christos Docolas, and Demetrius 
1 Vaphiadis from Greece; Heinz Fa- 
ber, Ingrid Faber, Franz Focke, 
Ursula Prewitt, Heinrich Schettler 
from Germany; Julio Gonzalez 
from Puerto Rico; Amos Gradjino- 
vsky from Israel; Ricardo Gutier- 
rex, Marcel Jean Pierre and Mauri- 
cio Ruffatti from El Salvador. 

Stina Hellberg from Finland; 
Nilda Leal from Guatemala; Char- 
les McFadden and Joseph Weeks 
from Panama; Robert Pilola from 
the Philippines; Walter Weldon, 
and Samuel Arlin Tayler from the 
Canal Zone; Anthony Ward from 
Ireland and Edward Watt from 
England. 



PE Workshop Set 
To Be Held Here 

A statewide elementary physical 
education workshop will be con- 
ducted at Northwestern State Col- 
lege Friday, Oct. 23, under the 
sponsorship of the Department of 
Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation and Phi Epsilon Kap- 




Miss Elsa Schneider 

pa, professional fraternity for male 
students and teachers of health, 
physical education, and recreation. 

Miss Elsa Schneider, a specialist 
for Health, Physical Education, Re- 
creation, and Safety of the U.S. 
Office of Education, will serve as 
consultant for the workshop. Au- 
thor of numerous articles, pam- 
phlets, and books, Miss Schneider 
has served as consultant in almost 
every state and has assisted in 
international conferences in Eur- 
ope, Asia, Africa, and Latin Amer- 
ica. 

Registration and all sessions of 
the daylong program will be con- 
ducted in the Coliseum, beginning 
at 8:30 a.m. 

Included in the program will be 
demonstrations on teaching tech- 
niques in self testing, games and 
basic skills, discussion and evalu- 
ation in interest groups, and crea- 
tive activities in the elementary 
program. 



Pillsbury Awards 
Contest Open 

A 1965 home economics grad- 
uate will literally win an exciting 
first job as junior executive with 
a major food firm. 

Through the Pillsbury Awards 
Program which annually selects 
the year's top home economics 
graduate, she will become Associ- 
ate Manager of The Pillsbury Com- 
pany's Educational Program for 
one year. 

In addition to her starting salary 
of $4,800, the top Awards Winner 
will receive a $500 cash prize, plus 
a $2,500 scholaship for graduate 
study - - or a permanent position 
with Pillsbury - - following her 
year of executive training. 

Her executive training includes 
not only recipe development and 
preparation of educational mater- 
ials in the Ann Pillsbury Consu- 
mer Service Kitchens, but work 
with other corporate departments 
as marketing, public relations, re- 
search and legal. The program is 
designed to give the Pillsbury A- 
wards winner practical, personal 
training, and an understanding of 
the Home Economist's role in busi- 
ness. 

Travel will be among the win- 
ner's duties when she represents 
Pillsbury at the AHEA National 
Convention, as official hostess to 
junior contestants at the annual 
Bake-Off, and as foods demonstra- 
tor on television shows through- 
out the country. 

Four other Awards finalists — se- 
lected, like the winner, on the ba- 
sis of scholarship, extracurricular 
interests, and personal suitability 
— will receive grants of $150 and 
two-day, expense-paid trips to 
Minneapolis. 

Applications for the Pillsbury 
Awards Program are now available 
from college or univesity Home 
Economics Departments. Closing 
date for applications is November 
18, 1964. 



Placement Office 
Sets Interviews 

The Continental-Emsco Company 
will conduct interviews Tuesday 
for January graduates who are 
candidates for Bachelor of Arts or 
Bachelor of Science degrees. 

The Company, a large oil field 
supply concern, is interested in 
students of all backgrounds. Con- 
ducting the interviews, to be held 
in the Placement Office, will be 
Mr. James W. Dees. 

The Shell Oil Company will be 
conducting interviews on October 
27, further details to be given la- 
ter. 

Appointments for these inter- 
views may be procured from Mr. 
Joe Webb, director of student 
placement office, room 19, Cald- 
well Hall. 



Sports Car Races 
Sn Lake Charles 

The 2nd Annual Jean Lafitte 
Sports Car Races will be held in 
Lake Charles on October 24 and 
25. The annual event will be spon- 
sored by the Lake Charles Junior 
Chamber of Commerce and will be 
sanctioned by the Southwest Louis- 
iana Region of the Sports Car Club 
of America. 

Spectators will have the oppor- 
tunity to witness some of the fast- 
est and finest production and cus- 
tom vehicles in competition. Lo- 
cal, area and nationally known 
drivers and their sports cars are 
expected for the big event and will 
be competing for trophies valued 
at $1,000 and coveted regional 
championship points needed to 
work towards national and inter- 
national point races. 

Entries will include such nation- 
ally known sports cars as the Mase- 
rati, Ferrari, Lotus, Jaguar, AC 
Ford Cobra, Chevrolet Stingray 
and many others. 

Advance tickets, $1.50, can be 
obtained by writing P.O. Box 123, 
Lake Charles. 



Valuable Additions Made To Library 
Record Budget Allocated This Year 



A record library budget for fis 
cal 1963-64 has made possible the 
addition of several items of per- 
manent value to the library, Don- 
ald MacKenzie, acting librarian, 
announced. 

Notable among these are the 
Undergraduate Shelf List of the 
University of Michigan, a complete 
file of Child Development Abstracts 
and Bibliography; a complete file 
of theJVew Orleans Times-Picayune 
on microfilm; completion of the 
library's set of Psychological Ab- 



NSC Nurses Assist 
During Disaster 

Faculty and students of North- 
western State College, School of 
Nursing assisted with the disaster 
relief program in Pineville, Louis- 
iana during Hurricane Hilda. 

Six student nurses gave 60 hours 
of service in helping to care for 
children and parents in the refu- 
gee center located at Central Lou- 
isiana State Hospital. Over 400 
people were housed in this area 
during the disaster. All were eva- 
cuees from south Louisiana. 

The shelters were staffed by pro- 
fessional nurses who are members 
of the American Red Cross as well 
as those who volunteered their ser- 
vices. 

Students who assisted will re- 
ceive credit for hours served to- 
ward their Red Cross Certification. 
They are: Madelyn Neimann, Ca- 
mille Gennaro, Louise Lawrence, 
Faye Martin, Judith Harville, and 
Barbara Krumm. 



stracts; completion of the library's 
holding of Louisiana census ma- 
terials; the Dictionary Catalog of 
the Ayer Collection of Americana 
and American Indians; a reprint 
set of the complete works of Mo- 
zart; and complete files .of about a 
dozen journals in various fields. 
In addition, a Reader-Printer, a 
microfilm reader, and several port- 
able film readers were acquired. 

Expenditures for the library 
reached a record high of $220,182 
for the fiscal year 1963-64. Repre- 
senting more than 6% of the total 
budget for education purposes 
compared to the minimum of 5% 
which has been recommended by 
the American Library Association, 
this figure reflects a determined 
effort to strengthen the library's 
holdings to accommodate a record 
undergraduate enrollment and also 
support a growing graduate pro- 
gram. 

A record of $82,619 was spent 
on books and binding this year 
compared to $51,628 in the pre- 
vious high year of 1959-60. How- 
ever, because a large part of this 
amount was made available near 
the end of the year, the items pur- 
chased have not all been received 
or catalogued for use. 

The total number of volumes in 
the library came to 138,310 at the 
end of the fiscal year, exclusive of 
almost 6,000 reels of microfilm and 
over 1,000 microcards. This is an 
increase of approximately 9,000 
volumes over the previous year. 
The number of magazine titles re- 
ceived by the library has risen to 
1,265 over the previous year's 
1,075. 





Grover Wiggins 



Rita Allen 




Pat Holley Scotty Maxwell 

ELECTED IN THE FRESHMAN run-off elections were 
Grover Wiggins, president; Rita Allen, vice-president; 
Pat Holley, women's representative: and Scotty Maxwell, 
men's representative. The president, men's representative 
and women's representative will serve as representatives 
for the freshman class on the Student Council. 



4 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1964 



Kappa Alpha Relates Activities 
Completes Most Successful Rush 



While mon of the college was 
vacationing tor the summer, mem- 
bers of Gamtna Psi chapter were 
busy making their carefully plann- 
ed summer rush program a reality. 
The main body of the rush was 
carried on in Shreveport, Natchi- 
toches, and Alexandria. One of the 
feature attractions was a barbecue 
given by the Shreveport Alumni at 
which 500 pounds of beef was 
served. Other events during the 
summer season included ski par- 
ties, dances, and cook outs. All in 
all the program was a success. 

44 Pledges 

October 21 was the final day of 
fall rush. The 44 new Kappa Alpha 
pledges are: Bob Bohnke, Richard 
Broussard, Danny Butler, Mike 
Candler, Joe Cobb, Bob Cyphert, 
Jim Curtis, Danny Davis, Jere 
Daye, Frank Dean, John DeBlieux, 
Roy DeBlieux, John Detraz, Pat 
Dunham, David Fraldo, Warren 
Fraser, Larry Fugular, Joel Furr, 
Mike Grady, Stephen Gregg, Bill 
Gerson, Hank Hammonds, Bill 
Hargrove, Hurbie Johnson, Jim 
Leabo, Bill Lee, Tommy Lewis, 
Van Lewis, Duryll Long, Dillon 
Matlock, Jerry McCormic, Kent 
McMichael, Gary Mitchell, Bob 
Nance, Tommy Nichols, Richard 
Noah, Dick Robertson, Mike Shok- 
ley, Charles Smith, Don Snell, Ken 
Stephens, John Swint, Clyde War- 
ren, Don Zick. The chapter is 
proud of each one of its pledges 
and feel they are the finest group 
we have ever had. 

Next came the task of initiat- 



ing the pledges who had fulfilled 
all their requirements during this 
past spring semester. The cere- 
monies were held October 9, and 
the men initiated were Tom 
Cathey, Bruce Fraser, Tom Har- 
well, Jack Norman, Chuck Prince, 
Charles Rabelais, John Thompson, 
Raymond Rogers, Allen Plummer 
and Warren Ward. The chapter is 
pleased to have these boys for 
their life-long Brothers. 

Tech Weekend 

In the near future is the Tech 
weekend during which the chapter 
is hosting two dances, an open 
dance on Friday evening and a 
closed party after the game for the 
members and their guests. Follow- 
ing this is a planned bus trip to 
the Northwestern-McNeese game. 
The chapter is also pleased to an- 
nounce that John Fred and the 
Playboys will supply the enter- 
tainment for our Annual "Old 
South" Week End this year. 

Plans are now under considera- 
tion for the building of a new 
KAPPA ALPHA house. The house 
will provide living accomodations 
for approximately 32 members, 
living room, chapter room, library, 
and perhaps dining facilities. Our 
President Joe Traigle has been 
working very hard on this project 
and has had the full cooperation 
of every member in working for 
our new house. 

Congratulations are in order for 
Brothers Jimmy Trotter and John 
Edgar on their recent family addi- 
tions, both girls, who will be fine 
prospects for KA Rose some day. 




LOOK YOUR BEST 
ON CAMPUS . . . 

Welt conditioned shoes ore on im- 
portant part of your appearance. 



SHOE REPAIRS 
OF 

ALL KINDS 

Special 
RANDY PEDIC 
Basketball Shoes 



Orthopedic Corrections 
Western Style Belts & Wallets 
Moccasins 
Polishes — Laces — Dyes 

GUNTER'S SHOE SERVICE 

BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 
Adopts By-laws 

The new members of Epsilon 
Upsilon chapter of Tau Kappa Ep- 
silon have begun the work of plac- 
ing their organization on a solid 
foundation by adopting its by-laws 
and forming the basic rules of the 
newly reorganized fraternity. The 
11 actives and 19 pledges met Octo- 
ber 6 to begin their work. 

The new Tekes also discussed 
the transportation of the Teke Bell 
to the State Fair Game and the ac- 
ceptance of an invitation by the 
Tech Tekes to take part in the 
TKE dance to be held in the Cry- 
stal Ballroom of the Washington 
Youree Hotel after the game. 

In reshaping the TKE Frater- 
nity on Campus, the members re- 
ceived the help of Dean Leonard 
O. Nichols and the assistance of 
Mrs. Ruth Weber, house-mother of 
Prudhomme dormitory. 

Wes Pierce and Cliec Statler, in- 
ternational representatives of TKE; 
and the members of the I.F.C. and 
other fraternities on Campus also 
assisted with moral backing in the 
task of reorganizing Tau Kappa 
Epsilon. 

The original eight men who be- 
gan this reorganization will be in- 
itiated soon by the Tech Chapter 
members. Pledge training has be- 
gun with Bucky Buchannan as 
pledge trainer. 



Alpha Sigma Alpha 
Has Slumber Party 

Dear Mama and Daddy, 

Being in Alpha Sigma Alpha is 
really wonderful. I have had so 
much fun this past week meeting 
all my sisters and learning about 
the sorority. Winona Gallagar, 
our pledge trainer, told us we had 
to have pledge points to be initiat- 
ed so I have been visiting around 
and doing odd jobs for my pledge 
points. I don't even mind making 
up a bed now that I know I'm go- 
ing to get points for it. 

Last weekend we had a slumber 
party after the football game. We 
built a fire in the fire place and 
sat around it drinking hot choco- 
late and eating toasted marshmel- 
lows. Some of the girls had a game 
of cards going and the rest just sat 
around and sang. Much later that 
night we all went to sleep to the 
music of the stereo. Everything 
was so quiet and peaceful with the 
music of Johnny Mathis when the 
record rejected and Banjo Party 
Time came blasting on. Oh, did 
that upset things for a while! 

Next week we are going to elect 
pledge officers. Our first pledge 
test is due then so I must go study. 
I really do like being in a sorority, 
especially since that sorority is 
Alpha Sigma Alpha. 
Love, 

Your Alpha Pledge 



CITY BANK & TRUST CO. 

We Welcome Accounts 
From Faculty And Students 

New — Modern — Convenient 
Drive-In Window To Serve 

Natchitoches, Louisiana 



SPECIAL HALF PRICE SALE 
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$2.20 Value only $1.10 plus Tax 
Max Factor's Five Famous Make Ups Special Size $1.00 Plus Tax 
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Revelon's Eterna 27 Cream-$7.00 Value Only $4.50 Plus Tax 
Plus The Finest In Cosmetics and Fragrances By Max Factor, 
Faherge, Revelon, Coty And Many Others 

Free Delivery Service. Charge Account Invited. 

Two Stores To Serve You 
DeBLIEUX' PHARMACY NEW DRUG STORE 



BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 
PHONE 4582 



SECOND AND ST. DENIS 
PHONE 2386 



Nu Sigma Chi 
Elects New Officers 

The Nu Sigma Chi Chapter of 
Alpha Lambda Delta, national hon- 
or sorority, met in Louisiana Hall 
to elect officers for the coming 
year and discuss plans for initia- 
tion. 

Elected as officers were: Pam 
James, vice-president; Kathy Mil- 
ler, secretary; Jessie Sneed, trea- 
surer; Maribeth Henderson, keeper 
of the grades; Sharon Hillman, 
publicity chairman; and Karen 
Bennett, social chairman. 




Learning about a European buffet. 

25,000 EUROPEAN 
JOBS 

Grand Duchy of Luxembourg 
—25,000 jobs in Europe are 
available to students desiring to 
spend a summer abroad but could 
not otherwise afford it. Monthly- 
wages range to $300 and jobs in- 
clude resort, office, child care, fac- 
tory, farm and shipboard work. 
$250 travel grants will be given 
to the first 5000 applicants. Job 
and travel grant applications and 
fall details are available in a 36- 
page illustrated booklet which 
students may obtain by sending 
$2 (for the booklet and airmail 
postage) to Dept. O, American 
Student Information Service, 22 
Ave. de la Liberie, Luxembourg 
City, Grand Duchy of Luxem- 
bourg. 



it staples 

term papers and class notes, photo- 
graphs, news items, themes, reports. 




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notes to bulletin board, pennants 
to wall, shelf paper, drawer linings. 




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party costumes, prom decorations, 
school projects, posters, stage seta 




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INC 



anvil 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



Editorials 



Co-ordination Needed Between 
Campus Security, Infirmary 

Campus Security and the Infirmary have often been the 
brunt of inefficiency jokes on the campus. However, soon this 
inefficiency becomes a serious problem. 

Since the nurse on duty at the Infirmary cannot leave the 
building, and a doctor will not come to the dormitories on 
campus, house directors are left to their own resources when 
an emergency arises. 

The first thought coming in their mind would naturally 
be to call campus security. This soon proves to be an unwise 
decision. The attitude of the force has been described as in- 
different. New officers have no definite idea of the location 
of some of the particular dormitories. Assistance is slow in 
coming and when it does come, it proves to be noassistance 
at all. 

There are times when inefficiency is aggravating and in- 
convient to those requesting help. There are times when it 
could mean the difference between life and death. 

It is suggested that the administration check the effici- 
ency of the Campus Security and the Infirmary in emergencies. 
Perhaps they could devise a way to help these two departments 
to be of greater service in case of emergency and in general. 

S. H. 



Why Require PE Gym Suits At All 

Why is it necessary after all these years for students tak- 
ing a physical education activity course to have to start buying 
a gym suit? Many juniors and seniors who are taking their last 
physical education course are having to buy one of these bag- 
gy monstrocities and will never have an occasion to use them 
again. And, many of the freshmen and sophomores will have 
but one other occasion to use them. 

If the purpose in having these suits is to have a group of stu- 
dents taking a PE class to look like a team, then the situation 
is hopeless anyway. It will take much more than matching ap- 
parel to help any ordinary PE class on this campus. One must 
remember that these boys are not athletes and most of them 
are taking the courses only because they are required. 

Another point of contention is that most of the men students 
will not take over two activity courses that require these suits 
during the entire time they are here. Most of the men will eit- 
her be taking bowling, fencing, dancing, golf or some other 
sport that requires ordinary clothes. 

Of course, this is a most lucrative business for the college 
Book Store. How could they keep from making a substantial 
profit when they are charging $2.75 for those flimsy shorts and 
trunks. 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 





LETTERS 
To The 
EDITOR 



Dear Editor, 

I just got my second load of 
clothes back from the laundry, and 
I am very disappointed. I have 
never seen such a mess as my two 
sheets and pillow case! 

When they were returned the 
first week, I thought that possibly 
the larger enrollment had caused 
a rushed job. But this week, they 
came back even worse. The wrink- 
les are pressed into the folds, and 
they are starched and completely 
out of shape. 

I wish that something could be 
done about this. It is against dor- 
mitory rules to wash sheets and 
towels, but I'd rather sleep on dir- 
ty sheets than have them needless- 
ly ruined. Since the laundry is a 
required fee, I feel that their ser- 
vice should be improved upon or 
some other alternative offered. 

Thank you for your kind atten- 
tion. 

Sincerely, 
Sandy Royer 



*YpMe 60T A GXm U'C KXWtlL FLAYeZ H£KE COACH, 
0LrT H£ ISN'T VGfcY'S *M'A-R T«'' 



urrent Sauce 

ESTABLISHED 1914 

Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
rept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
-ummer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
scription $3 the year payable in advance. 

Member of the Associated Collegiate Press 

Duffy Wall Editor-in-Chief 

Sharon Hillman Associate Editor 

Linda Weber News Editor 

Jerry Brill Sports Editor 

Jean Wall Society Editor 

John Lewis Business Manager 

Linda Broughton .... Advertising Manager 

•Jon Gibson staff Artist 

Roy G. Clark Faculty Adviser 

Editorial Staff: Linda Weber, Rusty Sav- 
age, Jerry Brill, Mary Ellen Davis, Rusty 
Savage, Gene Couvillion, Robert Durr, 
Max Duggan, WaUey Hebert. 

Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not reflect 
the opinions of the student body or the 
administration and faculty of the college. 

The Current Sauce prints the news im- 
partially. It supports what it believes to 
be right, and opposes what it believes to 
be wrcng, regardless. 

This paper is printed by the Graphic 
Arts Division of the Industrial Education 
Department of Northwestern. 



National Newspaper Week 
Salutes Player Of Many Roles 

This is National Newspaper Week. During the week, news- 
men are urging their readers to consider the many-sided role 
a newspaper plays in each citizen's life. 

A newspaper — even in this day of television and radio — 
is the only medium devoted exclusively to the dispensing of 
information. 

Day in and day out, its intersts are as broad as the uni- 
verse and as intimate as the neighbor next door. The news- 
paper brings historic news from Saigon, London, Paris, Wash- 
ington; it also records the birth in a happy household in the 
next block; it brings word of the latest bargains at a district 
shopping area and also from the corner store. 

Not always so well understood is the role a newspaper 
plays in preserving our freedoms. A good newspaper must 
be the conscience of a community and of the nation. This is the 
role of the free press. 

For whom is the press free? Not for the benefit of news- 
paper owners, but for the cause of individual freedom for 
the citizen. 

The constitutional provision for freedom of the press 
is part of the broader guarantee of the individual's right to 
speak and discuss freely without fear of government reprisals. 

The constitution says: "Congress shall make no law . . . 
abridging the freedom of speech or of the press." 

The right of free speech would mean little without free 
press. This was true in Washington's time; it is even more 
true today in our complex society of hundreds of millions. 

The right to speak frankly would have little practical 
effect today without the right to print, too. Even though the 
speaker had access to television or radio, he could speak only 
if what he said was generally approved by government, since 
radio and television licenses are granted and renewed only 
with the approval of politicians. 

The press, on the other hand, is unfettered. It is neither 
supported by government nor regulated by it. It may not be 
shut up by anyone except by economic force exerted by its 
readers. It is tempered only by the need of public acceptance. 

Newspapers are subject, however, to laws protecting the 
innocent against libel and slander, just as an individual is 
subject to them. Thus, when the press exposes, it must be 
able to prove truth and that it is acting in the public interest. 
Newspapers, large and small, are key factors in the check- 
balance system of a freed society. 

Thomas Jefferson said it well in a letter to LaFayette in 
1823. He wrote: 

"The only security for all is a free press. The force of 
public opinion cannot be resisted when permitted freely to be 
expressed." And he added: 

"The agitation it produces must be submitted to. It is 
necessary to keep the water pure." 

The Daily Oklahoman-Oklahoma City Times 
— Ralph. Sewell, Assistant Managing Editor 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1964 



SPORTS *DESK 

□ 

c?y - t/f/-/y Brill f Q 

1 



Northwestern suffered its first 
loss to a powerful Abilene Christ- 
ian last Saturday. It looked like 
it was going to be a long night 
at first but the Demons started 
fighting back to turn the affair 
into a ball game. We think the 
players should be commended for 
the way they showed their determ- 
ination and aggressiveness, and 
not giving up after trailing 22-0. 

Last weeks action in football 
saw upsets with this column being 
the victim of three of them. A- 
mong the games missed were Ole 
Miss, La. College, and NSC. We 
were able to tag seven games right, 
though to give a 7-3 record for 
the week. This makes the overall 
record 14-3 for an .824 average. 
NSC (28) over Ouachita — Demons 
had a few bad breaks in their 
last outing but they should bounce 
back strong. 

La. Tech (6) over Arlington — Bull- 
dogs have a good chance of re- 
ceiving their first setback of the 
year. 

McNeese (14) over Northeast — 
Cowboys outride the Indians. 
USL (3) over Tampa — Bulldogs 
were impressive in their last out- 
ing against Tech. Team with few- 
est mistakes win. 

LSU (7) over Kentucky— Tigers 
are too consistent while Kentucky 
has their ups and downs. 
Mississippi (21) over Tulane — 
Both teams have a losing streak. 
Rebels should come back strong 
to take this one with little trouble. 
Texas (7) over Arkansas — Texas 
remains number one in the battle 
of the perfect records. 
Alabama (21) over Tennessee — 
Alabama keeps up its bid for num- 
ber one. 

Rice (14) over SMU— Little trou- 
ble for the Owls. 
Georgia Tech (14) over Auburn — 
Auburn hurts with loss of their 
quaterback. 
Now some Quickies: 
Texas Tech (6) over Baylor. 
Texas A&M (7) over TCU. 
Miss. State (13) over Southern 
Miss. 

La. College (14) over Jacksonville. 



Catering to those who 
care about the health and 
beauty of their hair 

CHARM 
BEAUTY SHOP 

One-half Block 
From The Campus 

Phone 3948 114 Lee St. 
Open Monday Noon Till 
Saturday Noon 




Cross Country Track Meet Slated 
To Be Held On Campus Friday 



SLATED TO SEE PLENTY of action for the Demons Sat- 
urday night are, left to right, end Dick Reding, punter, 
Wayne Walker, and defensive specialist Kenny Guillot. 
Walker, the team's leading punter, has kicked the ball 
seven times for a total of 273 yards and a 39 yard average. 



TODD'S 



750 
FRONT ST. 



'A FRIENDLY Store' 



Your Favorite Brands 



FOR HER 

• "Vicky-Vaughn and Marty" Dresses 

• "Paddle & Saddle" Sportswear 

• "Happy Hiker" Shoes 

*i "Phil-Maid" Lingerie and Sleepwear 

• "Best-Form" Bras and Foundations 

FOR HIM 

• "Lee Rider" Jeans 
'Sports-Fan" Ivy Pants 
'Wesboro" Shoes 
'E&W" Shirts 
'B.V.D." Underwear 

Charge Accounts Invited 



Shop SANDEFUR'S JEWELERS 

Watches - Rings- 
Jewelry Of All Kinds 

NOW AT BIG DISCOUNT 
TO YOU NSC STUDENTS 



St. Denis St. 



Phone 6390 



Northwestern State College will 
play host to two other cross coun- 
try track teams here Friday as 
La. Tech and Northeast invade the 
campus. 

NSC is hoping that the addition 
of two new runners will help them 
return to the number one spot in 
the GSC. They are Anthony Ward 



of Ballaghaderreen, Ireland, and 
Edward Watt of Farnsborough, 
England. Both are welcome addi- 
tions to Ray Hale, who is tempo- 
rarily taking over for Coach Ern- 
est Howell. 

Other members of the NSC team 
are Bob Dufalo, Nick Wright, Dal- 
ton Phelps, Jim Phifer, and Tim 
Poston. 



SPECIAL TO COLLEGE STUDENTS 

1 . . . 5x7 . . . Portrait plus 8 wallet size . . . $4.75 
1 . . . 8x10 . . . Portrait plus 16 wallet size . . . $7.00 
WE DO NOT HAVE A SITTING CHARGE 



UHRBACH'S STUDIO 

(Your Potpourri Photographer) 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 

NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 
Phones — 5556 — 5557 



Ladies hair spray — brush rollers — bobby pins 
Your Choice — 2 for $1 

Men's high top and low quarter tennis shoes 
$2 pair 

Assorted material in plaids and solid colors 
4 yards for $1 

Large assortment of ladies fall and winter dresses 
$4 and $6 

Men's all leather insulated boots — $10 pair 

You'll find these and other outstanding 
values at BILL'S this weekend 

SHOP WITH US— YOU'LL BE GLAD YOU DID 

BILL'S DOLLAR STORE 

768 Front St. Phone 9475 




Coach Clayton presented WRECK TECH sweat shire 
by Diane Baker. 



Let's Get Together And 
WRECK TECH 

GET YOUR WRECK TECH SWEAT SHIRT NOW 

DON'T WAIT!!! 

BAKER'S BOOKSTORE 

NEXT TO LE RENDEZVOUS 
"NSC's Favorite Bookstore" 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 




Stagg Award Goes 
To Beasley, Dodd 

Last weeks action against the 
Abilene Christian Wildcats pro- 
duced two players who tied for 
the Alonzo Stagg award and 15 
honor roll members. Don Beasley 
and halfback Al Dodd were the 
recipients of the Stagg Award. 
Those named to the offensive hon- 
or roll were Beasley, Claude Pat- 
rick, Ed Horton, James Aymond, 
Charles Ragus, Hubert Adams, 
George Cognevich, Bobby Parker, 
Ross Gwinn, Dick Reding, Fred 
Fulton, and Eddie Mittelbronn. 
Those named to the defensive list 
were Dodd, Allen Plummer, and 
Arthur Floyd. 



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103 Second Street 



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Powerful Abilene Christian Rolls; 
Demons Suffer First Defeat 



Page 5 



Northwestern State suffered it's 
first loss in four games Saturday 
night before a Mom and Dad's Day 
crowd as the Abilene Christian 
Wildcats jumped to an early lead 
and swept to a 36-26 victory at 
Demon Stadium. 

Wayne Walker kicked off to 
start the ball game and Abilene 
moved 69 yards in 11 plays to 
score their first touchdown. Quar- 
terback Reynolds led the Wild- 
cats down to the NSC one where 
fullback Mike Love carried it over 
for the six pointer. Love also 
kicked the PAT to give the Wild- 
cats a 7-0 lead early in the first 
period. 

The Demons just couldn't get 
their offense clicking as they were 
forced to punt on a fourth and 
twelve situation to start the sec- 
ond quarter. Walker's punt was 
gathered in by Hagaman at the 

23 yard line and the shifty half- 
back scampered 77 yards for an- 
other Wildcat touchdown. Rey- 
nolds again kicked the extra point 
giving Abilene a commanding 22- 
second quarter lead. 

The Wildcats kicked off and 
James Aymond returned the ball 

24 yards to start the Demons on 
their first touchdown drive. Pat- 
rick followed with a 21 yard pick 
up to the Abilene 45 and Beasley 
slowly moved the Demons to the 
one foot line where Dick Reding 



hauled in a pass. Patrick took the 
ball over for the score and Beasley 
passed to Aymond for the two 
point conversion. 

Walker followed the touchdown 
with the kickoff to Hagaman at 
the 5 where a very unusual play 
took place. Hagaman, in his at- 
tempt to return the ball accident- 
ally booted the ball into the end 
2one and it appeared to be a safe- 
ty for NSC; however, at the time 
of the kickoff the referees had 
called a clipping penalty against 
the Wildcats and the ball was giv- 
en to Northwestern on the Abiene 
8-yard line. The Demons went on 
to score with Horton driving over 
from the one and the attempted 
two point conversion failed as Car- 
roll was trown for a loss. 

The Demon touchdown cut the 
Abilene lead to eight points but 
the Wildcats were not to be 
stopped as Mike Love scored an- 
other six-pointer from the two. 
Reynolds added the PAT and the 
score was 29-14 at intermission. 

James Aymond did all the point- 
making for the Demons in the sec- 
ondhalf of play scoring two touch- 
downs on a 23 yard run and a 
71 yard pass from Beasley. A two- 
point pass play was attempted by 
Beasley after each touchdown but 
both were incomplete as the final 
score remained 36-26. 



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Demons To Play Ouachita Baptist 



The Northwestern State College 
Demons, straight from a 36-26 de- 
feat at the hands of powerful Abi- 
lene Christian, return to action a- 
gain this week against the Ouachi- 
ta Baptists Tigers. 

The Tigers, coached by R. D. 
(Rab) Rodgers, have 25 returning 
lettermen from last years squad 
that compiled a 6-4 winning rec- 
ord. So far this season, they have 
put back to back wins over Ark- 
ansas State College and Harding 
to even their season record at 2-2. 

The last time these two clubs 
met was in 1947 when NSC posted 
a 20-2 win. They have played only 
six games and the Demons hold 
the edge in the series with five 
wins and only one defeat. 

The Demons will have a pair 
of fine backs going for them in 



James Aymond and Claude Pat- 
rick. Aymond is the teams leading 
ground gainer as he has picked up 
200 yards in 19 carries for a 10.5 
yard average. He is also the teams 
leading pass receiver with seven 
receptions good for 171 yards and 
two TD's. He has scored a total 
of 20 points to also lead his team 
in that department. Patrick is the 
teams second leading ground gain- 
er as he has carried the ball 34 
times for a total of 170 yards and 
a 5.0 yard average. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
SERVICES 
Old Lemee House 
Jefferson St. 
Every Sunday 11:00 A.M. 
All are welcome 




STUDENTS 

Let us pamper your 
parents when they come 
to visit you. 

For Room Reservations 
dial 6401 

"Wake-up Coffee and Papers' 



PENNYLAND 

1300 Washington Across From Peoples Motor Co. 

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 
8 A.M. -12 P.M. 



Free Transportation To And From 
The College - 8 A.M. - 11 A.M. 

SIX POOL TABLES 
(Brunswick, Gold Crown) 

TWO SNOOKER TABLES 
(Brunswick, Gold Crown) 

Shuffle Board - Domino Tables 
Moon Tables - Bowling Tables 
Shooting Gallery 

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ENTERTAINMENT FOR ALL 
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Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAJCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1964 



Distinquished Service Awards To Be 
Given In International Education 



Beginning in 1965, the Institute 
of International Education and the 
Reader's Digest Foundation will 
give five annual awards for distin- 
guished service in international 
education. 

Grants of $1,000 each will be 
given to a selected college or uni- 
versity, a private organization, a 
community and an individual who 
have made outstanding contribu- 
tions to the development of inter- 
national understanding. A business 
corporation will also be cited but 
will not receive a cash award. 

The announcement was made 
jointly by Kenneth Holland, presi- 
dent of the Institute, and Sterling 
W. Fisher, executive director of 
the Foundation. The Institute is 
a leading nonprofit private agency 
in the field of international educa- 
tional exchange. The Reader's Di- 
gest Foundation is the philanth- 
ropic arm of the world's most wide- 
ly circulated magazine, which is 
published in 14 languages. 

In announcing the new awards 
program, Mr. Holland said: "By 
establishing the awards on an ann- 
ual basis, we shall be able to give 
recognition to many more institu- 
tions, organizations, and individ- 
uals who are participating actively 
in educational and cultural ex- 
change. 

"Heretofore, it was possible to 
accord this recognition only at our 
large national conferences held in 
1956, 1959 and 1960. This year, 
1964, the Reader's Digest Founda- 
tion assisted us in granting cash 
awards to five colleges and univer- 
sities at our Fifth Conference on 
International Education in Febru- 
ary. By increasing and extending 
their grant, they have made it pos- 
sible to establish an annual awards 
program and to call attention to 
the depth of interest in this coun- 




THE FINEST, MOST 
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ARE FOUND AT 

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try in constructive exchange-of- 
persons programs." 

Criteria for evaluating the con- 
tribution of candidates for the 
awards were established in 1956 
when the first HE awards were 
made. The quality of a program 
rather than its size has become the 
determining factor for the selec- 
tion of awardees. ffl 

The college or university se- 
lected for the IIE-Reader's Digest 
Foundation Award will designate 
an individual affiliated with its 
program to use the grant for tra- 
vel in a foreign country, thereby 
broadening his or her internation- 
al experience. This individual may 
be a foreign student adviser, an 
admissions officer, a professor or 
a community member who partici- 
pates in hospitality programs for 
foreign visitors. 



Home Economics Reception 

The freshmen home economics 
students were honored Thursday 
night at a formal reception held 
in the living room of the Home 
Economics Department. Guests in- 
cluded the heads of the various de- 
partments. 




Delta Zeta Names Pledge Officers 



Epsilon Beta Chapter of Delta 
Zeta announces the officers of the 
pledge class. They are Ann Cleve- 
land, president; Cora Jacobs, vice- 
president in charge of scholar- 
ship; Susie Thompson, secretary; 
Grace Wilson, treasurer; and Lynn 
McCormick, song leader. 

The first standards meeting of 
the year was held October 6 in the 
sorority room. Guest speaker was 
Mr. Tandy McElwee, director of 
testing service. 

Delta Zetas observed Mom and 
Dad's Day by having a Parents' 
Day Banquet at the Country Club. 
Speaker for the occasion was Dean 
Leo Albritton whose topic was 
"Women." 

After the NSC-ACC football 
game, Delta Zetas enjoyed a slum- 



ber party at the W.O.W. Club. 
Chaperons were Mrs. Mattie Wood- 
ward, Mrs. H. L. Graham, and Mrs. 
Willie Cummings. 

Congratulations to Cecilia Shea, 
State Fair Queen, and to her Del- 
ta Zeta sisters Susie Brown and 
Carolyn Thomas, maids on the 
court. Congratulations also to Rita 
Allen who was elected in the run- 
off for freshman vice-president. 

Delta Zetas are anticipating a 
great weekend for their car wash 
which will be held Saturday, Oc- 
tober 17, at the Pel-State service 
station. Please take this as a per- 
sonal invitation to have your car 
washed by Delta Zetas. We prom- 
ise you that you will receive "ser- 
vice with a DZ smile." 



OPEN 
24 HOURS A DAY 

MURPHY'S RESTAURANT 

1215 WASHINGTON ST. PHONE 2609 



Americanism Club 

The Northwestern State College 
Americanism Club is now a char- 
ter member of the "Young Ameri- 
cans for Freedom" a national 
youth organization. U interested 
contact John Woodyard, Bossier, 
telephone 480 or Dr. Andelson, 
Guardia Hall. 




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Next To Bookstore 



Mr. Miller 



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Open 7-5 All Week— Sat. Till Noon 



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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 



Poetry Contests 
Open To Students 

The second annual Kansas City 
Poetry Contests - - offering $1,500 
in cash prizes and one book publi- 
cation - - have been announced by 
Thorpe Menn, literary editor of 
the Kansas City Star, co-sponsor 
of the contests. 

Six honor awards totaling $600 
will be offered to college students 
for single poems. These are spon- 
sored by Hallmark Cards, Inc., of 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Another, the Dr. Edward A. De- 
vins Award, offers a cash payment 
of $500 for a book-length manu- 
script. It will be published and dis- 
tributed by the University of Miss- 
ouri Press. The total value of this 
award will be determined by sales. 
The $500 is in the form of a guar- 
anteed advance royalty payment. 

Open Competition 

Both the Devins award and the 
Hallmark awards are offered in 
open competition on a national ba- 
sis. The Hallmark awads are open 
to students of junior colleges of 
undergraduate or graduate status. 

Ten other prizes, totaling $400, 
are offered to poets of the six sta- 
tes surrounding the Greater Kan- 
sas City region - - Missouri, Kan- 
sas, Iowa, Nebraska, Oklahoma, 
and Arkansas. The Kansas City 
Star awards include one $100 
prize, two $50 prizes, and five $25 
prizes in open competition. High 
school students may compete for 
the H. Jay Sharp Poetry Prizes — 
one $50 and one $25 prize. 

Information on submitted en- 
tries may be obtained by sending 
a self-addressed stamped envelope 
to: Contest Directors, P. O. Box 
306, Kansas City, Missouri, 64141. 

Closing Date 

Closing date for submission of 
all entries is February 1, 1965. 
Winners will be announced April 
29 at the last of the 1964-65 Amer- 
ican Poets Series sponsored by the 
Kansas City Jewish Community 
Center. 

All entries will be judged anony- 
mously. Even names of judges - - 
all of whom are nationally recog- 
nized poets and critics - - will not 
be revealed until after the con- 
tests are decided. Entrants must 
submit their work with no clue to 
authorship. The name of the auth- 
or is to be enclosed in a sealed en- 
velope attached to the entry. 

"Hearts of America" 

This year's contest is an out- 
growth of the "Hearts of America" 
poetry contest sponsored in 1963 
by the newspaper and Mr. Sharp, 
a Kansas City businessman. The 
initial contest was such a success, 
in terms of number of entries and 
quality of work, that Dr. Devins, 
the University of Missouri Press, 
and Hallmark Cards were prompt- 
ed to volunteer additional prize 
money. Hallmak has long encour- 
aged a wider acceptance of serious 
poetry. In 1960 the greeting card 
firm published "Poetry for Plea- 
sure," a best selling anthology of 
contemporary and classical poetry. 



WESLEY 
Foundation 



SUNDAY 

9:00 A.M.— Coffee 
9:30 A.M. — Forum 
6:00 P.M.— Bible Study 



WEDNESDAY 



5:00 P.M.- 
5:45 P.M.- 
ship 



-Supper 

-Program & Wor- 



FRIDAY 

7:30 A.M. — Morning Vespers 

OFFICE HOURS 

10:00 A.M.— 12 Noon 
1:00 P.M.— 2:30 P.M. 




THREE MEMBERS OF THE Contemporary Dance Club 
demonstrate a modern dance design. They are (left to 
right, Joan Denham, Mary Gilson and Mary Lawless. 

Varsity Dancers Announce Schedule 



The "Varsity" dance group on 
Northwestern State College, 
known as the Contemporary Dan- 
cers has announced its schedule of 
programs for the coming year. 

Performances include a concert 
in November, presented by Stina 
Hellberg, as partial requirements 
for her master's degree; a lecture 
demonstration on "Dance in Edu- 
cation" for the Physical Education 
Section of the LTA; a Christmas 
Concert and inter-departmental 
"Christmas Assembly"; the Louis- 
iana College Dance Symposium at 
Southeastern Louisiana College in 
February; the NSC Drama Festi- 
val; and a Spring concert. 

The Contemporary Dancers serve 



the campus in a manner similar to 
other college performing groups. 
The unique and specific purposes 
are to: provide a practical exper- 
ience for advanced dance students 
in performing before an audience, 
choreographing dances, and solv- 
ing problems related to staging 
dance; provide the dance perfor- 
mance needs of our campus; serve 
the special needs related to teach- 
ing; and deem it an honor to be a 
member of the group and represent 
NSC in the "dance world." 

Officers are Judy Winn, presi- 
dent; Ramona Reynolds, vice-presi- 
dent; Phyllis Guidry, secretary-re- 
porter; and Carol Adkins and Bet- 
ty Morgan, costume coordinators. 



Malts 



Frosted Drinks 
Hamburgers 
Southern Maid Do-Nuts 



Visit 



ZEST0 

For Free Delivery To Dorm Call — 2385 



Dr. Kyser Approves Committees; 
Students, Faculty Members Named 



Dr. John S. Kyser, president of 
Northwestern State College ann- 
ounced that he had approved the 
list of members submitted by Dr. 
William E. Timon, Jr., chairman 
for the Committee on Committees 
and Steve Blount, president of the 
student body. 

Committees appointed and ap- 
proved are: 

Academic and Professional Stan- 
dard Committee: Nahm, Whitting- 
ton, Hyde, West, Outland, Kemp, 
Harris, Bean, E. Webber, Irby Mc- 
Can and John Lewis. 

Artist Series Committee: Car- 
lucci, Bridges, Magers, Fletcher, 
Joe Salter, Linda Daughtry, J.O. 
Charrier, and Sue Ellen Forbes. 

Assembly Committee : Tarver, 
Combs, J.W. Johnson, Flood, Raw- 



son, Steinkamp, Betty Moore, Mil- 
ton Rhea, Rahn Sherman, and Pat 
Watkins. 

Campus Beautirication Commit- 
tee: Ware, Stevens, Davion, Han- 
chey, Palmer, Richie, Ledet, Carol 
Stone, and Jack O'Neill. 

College Publications Committee: 
Hammond, Coulon, Thomas, C. 
Johnson, Land, Tiller, Ryland, Mor- 
row, Cain, S. Nelken, Graham, Rob- 
bins, Beville. 

Commencement Committee: Sto- 
kes, Ora Williams, Buckley, Kemp, 
Cross, Hamby, Culp, and Jimmy 
Berry. 

Community Services Committee: 
Eversull, Rhoades, Davis, Cousins, 
r. Taylor, Fell, E. Brown, Outland, 
Rodney Elkins, Patsy Gaspard, 
(See Committees, page 8) 



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Headquarters For Campus 
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Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1964 



OTS Club To Meet; 
Open To Everyone 

The Northwestern State College 
Officer Training School Club will 
hold its regular meeting on Octo- 
ber 19 in the 'N Room' of the Col- 
iseum at 7 p.m. 

All sophomores, juniors, sen- 
iors, and graduates are eligible for 
membership and their attendance 
is solicited. The OTS Club is pri- 
marily for those college students 
both male and female who may be 
interested in obtaining a commis- 
sion in the United States Air 
Force. 

Anyone interested in learning 
about the club is cordially invited 
to attend the meeting as a visitor. 
Election of new officers will be 
included in the regular business. 

For more information call Sgt. 
DeArmond in Alexandria, collect 
at 445-6511, extension 66. 



Navy Flight Team 
To Visit Campus 

The Navy's flight information 
team from the Naval Air Station, 
New Orleans, headed by Lieutenant 
Commander David E. Musselman, 
USN, will visit Northwestern State 
College Campus on Thursday and 
Friday, October 22 and 23, to ad- 
vise and interview interested 
young men who can qualify for 
one of the Navy's Aviation Officer 
Programs. Qualifying examina- 
tions will be administered on the 
campus. 

While on campus, the team will 
make their headquarters in the 
student center and will be most 
happy to answer all questions con- 
cerning naval aviation and other 
naval officer programs. 



NSC Rifle Team 
Prepares For Year 

The Northwestern State College 
Sharpshooters are beginning to 
shape up for the Fall and Spring 
semesters. With almost double the 
turnout of the preceeding year, 
the rifle team will have a good po- 
tential this fall. 

The rifle team is also sponsor- 
ing an Auxiliary Women's team. 
So far sixteen women have signed 
up, we urge more women to try 
out. To join see Major Burns in the 
ROTC Armory. 



AMS Hold Meeting 
Name New Officers 

The Associated Men Students 
executive council met October 8 
to elect officers for the coming 
year. Calbert Marcantel in his 
capacity as vice-president for men 
will serve as ex-officio president 
of the council. 

Officers elected by the council 
were: Randy Webb, vice-president; 
David Carter, secretary; and Shel- 
ley Bennett, treasurer. 

Three committees were appoint- 
ed for the following projects: the 
revision of rules regulating radio- 
active fallout protection, setting 
up trash barrels in various places 
on the campus, and a more ef- 
fective means of recognizing ac- 
ademic achievement in men's dor- 
mitories. 

The members were also asked 
to work along with their house di- 
rectors to establish regulations 
concerning emergency measures 
for fire protection in their respec- 
tive dormitories. Other measures 
of importance were discussed and 
the meeting was adjourned. 

Those attending the meeting 
were: Calbert Marcantel, David 
Carter, Scotty Maxwell, Charles 
Wimberly, Herman Albritton, Tom- 
my Harwell, Wayne Meachum, 
Randy Lewis, Shelly Bennett. 

Bob Hurtado, Richard Brous- 
sard, Litton Nugent, Hershel Bry- 
ant, Randall Webb, John Wood- 
yard, David Faraldo, Paul Sepul- 
vado, Gerald Hunt, Roy Sullivan 
and Glynn Keith. 



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Laundromat 

936 College Avenue 

CONVENIENT TO 
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7 days a week 



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Knights Perform 
At Sabine Fair 

The Black Knights, NSC's ROTC 
honor-laden drill team, performed, 
for the first time this semester, in 
the Sabine Parish Fair Parade at 
Many, October 8. 

Twenty veterans and sixteen 
new members, under the direction 
of Commander Cadet Lt. Colonel 
M. J. Gaspard, practised three 
weeks for the event. 

The team is now preparing for 
its next performance at the State 
Fair and Tech Game in Shreveport 
on October 24. 

Squad leaders for this year are 
Cadet Major Thomas Putnam, Ca- 
det Captain Robert Port, Cadet 
First Seargent William Ayers, and 
Cadet First Seargent Ralph McRae. 



Hellberg Presents Concert 

Stina Hellberg, graduate student 
from Finland, is doing a produc- 
tion thesis for her masters degree. 
Her concert will be Friday, Dec- 
ember 4, at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts 
Auditorium at Northwestern State 
College. 

Since the concert will be given 
the night before the annual Nat- 
chitoches Christmas Festival, there 
will be Christmas dances on the 
program. 



CHIEF DRIVE-IN 



Now Showing 



Michael Callan 
Dean Jones 
'THE NEW INTERNS' 



Saturday's 
Double Feature 



Audie Murphy 
'THE QUICK GUN' 

— PLUS — 

Spencer Tracy 
"THE DEVIL AT 
FOUR O'CLOCK" 

Both in Color 



Sun.-Mon.-Tues. 



Academy Award Winner 
Best Picture Of The Year! 

"TOM JONES" 

Albert Finney 
color 



Wednesday 
'BUCK NIGHT' 



Admission — $1.00 per car. . . 
Regardless of number ofper- 
sons in the car. . . . 

Kirk Douglas 
"FOR LOVE OF MONEY" 

— PLUS — 

Glenn Ford 
"CRY FOR HAPPY" 
Both in Color 



Committees— 

(Continued from page 7) 

Barbara Wallace, Joe Butler, Betty 
Clegg, and Nick DeJean. 

Discipline Committee: O. Wat- 
son, Philp, Kruse, Alost, C. Nelken, 
Marx, Stanley Branton, Roy Cor- 
ley, Duffy Wall, and Jimmy Berry. 

Library Committee: Dunn, Mc- 
Kenzie, Thompson, M. Bailey, Mc- 
Coy, Gregory, Wells, Yeqtes, Wef- 
fenstette, Doering, Radley, Lynn 
Graff, and Sharon Hillman. 

Student Publications Committee: 
Clark, Dunagan, H. Townsend, Rad- 
asinovich, Boone, Fred McDowell, 
Pat Cooper, Gary Johnson, Roy 
Corley, Gene Walker, and Patsy 
Gaspard. 

Student Welfare Committee : 
Easley, Hillard, Galloway, McCul- 
lough, Noles, Oswald, Hendrick, 
Deason, Tommy Putnam, Barbara 
Martin, Rebecca Alphin, Carolyn 
Thomas. 



Calvary Baptist 
Welcome Students 

The Calvary Baptist Church lo- 
cated on Highway 1 north wel- 
comes NSC students to attend ser- 
vices on Sundays. Sunday school 
begins at 10:00 a.m., morning wor- 
ship service at 11:00 a.m., training 
union at 6:30 p.m. and evening 
worship service at 7:30 p.m. 



CANE THEATRE 

Natchitoches, La. Phone 2922 



Friday & Saturday 
Double Feature 




TROY DONAHUE - CONNIE STEVENS 1Y HARDIN 

SIEFANIE POWERS -ROBERT CONRAD JACK 

WESTON - JERRY VAN DYKE wST* - j 

liicwiiiHoa'wnwwiue From WASHER BROS. Ml 
TECHNICOLOR 5 

eOlUUBIA PICTURES Preoents IBIWI I ■ 




Sunday — Tuesday 



THEIR FIRST FULL-LENGTH 
MOTION PICTURE IN COL ORS 

\fnmii~ 

bSeAMT 

CO STARRING 

jOEFLYNN-TIM CONWAY 

AND THE WHOLE McHALE'S CREW! 



Wednesday — Thursday 



wwi Pwrte»ttv« ftd-Jlt Entertainment! ______ 

mm* PAUL|GERALDINE 
NEWMAN iRAGE 

BY TENNESSE^K^a&ajEll** 

WILLIAMS ^ J© 
CINEMASCOPE MET ROCOLOR ' 





DON 
Theatre 

BOX OFFICE OPENS 

Mon.-Fri. 5:45 

Sat. & Sun 12:45 



NOW SHOWING 




A PARAMOUNT RELEASE 



Saturday's 
Double Feature 



Paul Newman 
in 



A BOLD NEW LOOK IN SUSPENSE! I 

M-G-M presents 




m PANAVISION'andMETROCOLOR 



— PLUS — 
Audie Murphy 



in 



'THE SHOWDOWN' 



Sun.Mon. Tues. 




CoNNiefRancis 
JiMHulTon 



■ Susan Joby Barbara Jay C 

■ Oliver" Baker ' Nichols 'Flippen 



PANAVISIONe METROCOLOR 



E WEI RHULA 
"IMIEUX-PRENTISS 



Starts Wed., Oct 21 
'RIDE THE WILD SURF' 



NSC STUDENT CHECKING ACCOUNT 
20 PERSONALIZED CHECKS & SERVICE CHARGE FOR $2.00 

GET DEMON EMBLEMED CHECKS AND COVERS AT 



THE PEOPLES BANK AND TRUST CO. 

120 Church Street 



Another Privilege In Jeopardy 

Throughout the years Northwestern State College and 
Louisiana Tech have been allowed to carry on various activities 
in Shreveport as a prelude to the annual State Fair football 
game. But, if things don't improve, this tradition is soon to be 
lost. Even this year there was some justifiable dissention 
among the businessmen of Shreveport as to whether or not to 
allow the functions to continue. 

Last year many students abused the privileges extended 
them by the City and brought much criticism on both institu- 
ions. The destruction and wreckage caused by drunkeness and 
general unconcern by far overshadowed the profits made by 
the metroplitan businessmen. 

The hotel management has long been dismayed by the 
problems created by this particular weekend. Some hotels and 
motels have already restricted the renting of rooms to students 
for various reasons, and if things aren't greatly improved this 
year, there will probably be a complete boycott by the hotels 
and motels next year. It would be rather senseless for them 
to keep operating at a loss just for the benefit of irresponsible 
adolescents. 

This is by no means a threat to the students, but a warn- 
ing and a plea for you to conduct yourselves as responsible 
young men and women. You must remember that you are 
representing Northwestern State College in your every action, 
and whatever you do will be direct reflection on the College! 

One may still enjoy himself and not be a nusiance to 
everyone else if he so desires. Without cooperation on every- 
one's part students will not be welcomed by the City and its 
citizens, and another privilege will be lost. 





Operatic Wig Wagging 



Goldovsky Grand Opera Will Present 
"La Boheme" By Puccini Tuesday 



"La Boheme," considered by 
many to be Puccini's finest score, 
will be presented in English by the 
Goldovsky Grand Opera Theater of 
Boston, at Northwestern State Col- 
lege, Tuesday at 8 p.m., as the 
season's first attraction of the Nor- 
thwestern-Natchitoches Concert 
Association. 

This performance by the Gold- 
ovsky Grand Opera Theater, under 
the artistic direction of Boris Gold- 
ovsky, marks the twelfth national 
tour of the Company, and before 
the end of this current season, the 
troupe will have completed an add- 
itional two tours, presenting both 
"Don Giovanni," and "Don Pasqu- 
ale" in addition to the "La Bohe- 
me" performance. The audience 
should have no difficulty in follow- 
ing the down to earth story of "La 
Boheme", for like all other 32 ope- 
ras in the Goldovsky Company's 
active repertoire, it has painstak- 
ingly been translated into contemp- 
orary idiomatic English. 

Included among the company 
and cast of fifty are Jerold Siena 
as Rodolfo; Ronald Holgateas Mar- 
cello; J.B. Davis as Colline; Carol 
Courtman as Mimi; Maria Candida 
as Musetta; and Frank Hilfreich as 
Alcindoro. 

Season tickets for the artist se- 



ries sponsored by the Northwest- 
dividual admissions for "La Bo- 
ern-Natchitoches Concert Associa- 
tion, are still available at $7 for 
adults and $3.50 for children. In- 




Boris Goldovsky 

heme" only will be sold at the of- 
fice of the Fine Arts Auditorium 
at $4.50 for adults and $2.20 for 
children. Students will be admit- 
ted upon presentation of their ID 
cards. 




urre 



nt S 



auce 



VOL. LI-— No. 7 Northwestern State Co llege, Natchitoches La. Friday, Oct. 23, 1964 

Activities For State Fair Day Outlined 




IN THE SECOND ACT of "The State of the Union" pre- 
sented by the Northwestern State College drama depart- 
ment Mary Matthews, played by Cindy Smith greets three 
influential voters introduced to her by her husband, Grant 
Matthews, played by Milton Tarver. 

"State Of The Union" Ends Tonight; 
Completes Successful Three Day Run 



The College Theater of North 
western State College will present 
the last performance of 'State of 
the Union', by Howard Lindsay 
and Russer Crouse tonight at eight 
o'clock in the Little Theater. 

A Pulitzer Prize winner, this de- 
lightfully fresh satirical comedy 
on politics is a sharp challenge to 
all Americans interested in getting 
good government. It is a story of 
behind-the-scenes politics showing 
how much choice the public really 
has in selecting its leaders. 

Directed by Dr. Edna West of 
the Northwestern drama depart- 
ment, the cast is Vernon Martin as 
James Conover, Gordon Parker as 
Spike MacManus, Wavelyn Murray 
as Kay Thorndyke, Alan Richard- 



Stay Off Field 

All NSC students have been 
urged to stay off the football 
field prior to the start of the 
NSC-Louisiana Tech game. Due 
to mass confusion before the 
game in past years, officials 
from NSC and Tech have agreed 
that no one will be allowed on 
the field. 

If students from either school 
should insist upon going on the 
field that school's team will be 
penalized 15 yards at the st^rt 
of the game. 



son and Milton Traver as Grant 
Matthews. 

Celeste Brooks as Norah, Cindy 
Smith as Mary Matthews, James 
Long as the bellboy, Buddy Dur- 
ham as the waiter, William Rofell 
as Sam Parrish, Doyle Williams as 
Swenson, Harvey Wilson as Judge 
Jefferson Davis Alexander, Anne 
Weavr as Mrs. Alexander. 

Catherine Wall as Jenny, Mary 
Ellen Davis as Mrs. Draper, Sam 
Shelton as Senator Lauterback, 
and David Durr, Glenn Hawkins 
and Walter Stiles as labor leaders. 

Headed by Judy Joiner, assist- 
ant to the director and Danny Gay- 
er.stage manager, the members of 
the stage crew are Frances Coun- 
cill, James Norvell, Anne Weaver, 
Carol Ann Adkins, Janie Arm 
strong, Adnrea Barnett, and Betty 
Bloch. 

Mary Ellen Davis, David Durr, 
Phyllis Guidry, Glenn Hawkins, 
Jim Hawthorne, Susan Hemphill, 
Linda Jackson, Mary Lawless, 
Cynthis Milton, Betty Morgan, 
Ramona Raynolds, William Rowell, 
Rod Runyan, Lawrence Vickers, 
Doyle Williams, and Harvey Wil- 
son. 

Andrea Barnett is head of cos- 
tumes; Doyle Williams, lights; 
Phyllis Guidry, sound effects; 
Susan Hemphill, makeup; Betty 
Bloch, stage properties; Linda 
Jackson, hand properties, Francis 
Councill, publicity. 



Starting the activities this week- 
end for Northwestern State Col- 
lege and Louisiana Tech will be a 
banquet at 12 noon Saturday in the 
Washington- Youree Hotel in 
Shreveport, attended by student 
council members of both colleges. 

The next event scheduled is the 
State Fair Parade which will form 
on the east side of the cemetery 
next to the Municiple Auditorium. 
The NSC color guard will lead the 
parade. Then the NSC drill team, 
President, cheerleaders, band, 
maids, and queen will follow in the 
prearranged order. The next car 
in the parade will be the one car- 
rying the Tech and NSC Student 
Body Presidents. The Tech color 
guard, drill team, President, cheer- 
leaders, band, maids and queen 
will then follow in the prearranged 
order. 

Beginning at 2 p.m. the parade 
will move down Milam Street to 
Edwards Street. There it will turn 
left onto Edwards Street and pro- 
ceed to Texas Street. Once again 
the parade will turn left onto Texas 
Street. The NSC units will turn 
left onto McNeil Street and then 
again left at Milam Street. 

Here the NSC units will disas- 
semble on the Milam Street side 
of the Court House where they will 
hold their pep rally. Tech will dis- 
assemble on the Texas Street side 
of the Court House and hold its 
peprally there. 

At 7:40 p.m. the drill teams of 
both schools will march onto the 
field signaling the beginning of the 
pre-game ceremonies. The teams 
will render a flowing Queen Anne 
Salute for their respective queens. 
Maids of the NSC and Tech courts 
will be announced alternately. 

Introduced by a fanfare and 
march by the bands, the NSC 
queen and then the Tech queen 
will be presentd. 

After the Tech queen has left 
the field, the Tech band director 
will lead the host band in the play- 
ing of the Star Spangled Banner, 
ending the ceremonies. 



WRECK 
TECH 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1964 




JOE TRAIGLE, KA PRESIDENT, is seen talking with 
Mrs. Beth Cloutier at the KA barbecue last Saturday. 
Mrs. Cloutier was hostess at the barbecue which was held 
at her plantation, and also assisted at the dance that even- 
ing. 

KA Barbecue Held At Cloulier's 



Members of Kappa Alpha were 
entertained last weekend with a 
barbecue held at Mrs. Beth Clou- 
tier's plantation. The food was 
cooked by assistant chefs Jack 
Norman, Jim Brasette, and Lynn 
Hargrave in the absence of chief 
cook Fred Fraser. The activities of 
the day were concluded with an 
evening of dancing at the St. 
Mary's High School Auditorium 
featuring Mitch and the Mistys. 
Kappa Alpha wishes to extend 
special thanks to Mrs. Beth Clou- 
tier, who helped with the prepara- 
tion of food for both the barbecue 
and the buffet for the dance. 
. The pledge class held its first 
regular meeting October 13 during 
which this semester's pledge offi- 
crs were electd. These officers 
are: Kent McMichael, president; 
Danny Davis, vice-president; Don 
Snell, secretary-treasurer; and Jim 



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Leabo, parlimentarian. The pled- 
ges displayed skill in defeating the 
active football team by a score of 
13-6 last Friday. 

The final touches for the Tech 
weekend are being made by Tim 
Miciotto and his social committee. 
The kickoff is at 9:00 p.m. Friday 
night at the Elks Club with an 
open dance featuring artists such 
as Good Rockin' Luke and the Cas- 
sanovas. Admission is $2.00 per 
couple, which will be charged at 
the door. Saturday, of course, the 
chapter will attend the parade, 
fair, and game. After the game 
the chapter is hosting a closed par- 
ty for members and their invited 
guests. KA members Pittman, 
Plummer and Guillot will help 
make sure we wreck Tech on the 
gridiron, and we want the entire 
team to know we're behind them 
all the way. 



Alpha Sig Elects 
Pledge Officers 

The Alpha Sigma Alpha pledge 
class elected officers at their last 
meeting. They are; Sue Egros, 
president; Cheri Lefebver, vice- 
president; Kay Kneipp, secretary; 
Royce Thibodaux, chaplin; and 
Betty Smith, treasurer. Also in our 
pledge class are Michelene Alle- 
tag, Andrea Barnett, Sherry Cre- 
ighton, Jane Dosher, Marie Gary, 
and Sandra La Cour. 

Others are Ann Lawson, Mar- 
garet McMeel, Lynn Noel, Judy 
Perrodin, Deeann Pittman, Sandra 
Royer, Barbara Russell, Becky 
Shuler, Gale Spurlock, Francis 
Toler, and Terry Ware. 

The Alpha Sigs were given a tel- 
evision by Mr. and Mrs. R. Bloch 
Jr., parents of Ann and Betty 
Bloch. The A.S.A.house now has 
a stero, a piano, and a television. 
The house is and affords a good 
place to have meetings and slum- 
ber parties. 

The executive concil met and 
made plans for the rest of the 
semester. These plans include a 
Halloween party, a slumber party 
after the Homecoming game, and 
a birthday party for our Founder's 
Day program. Girls from Beta 
Zeta's chapter of Alpha Sigma 
Alpha at Southwestern in Lafay- 
ette have been invited for the 
slumber party. 



BSU Student Choir 
Presents Special 
At Convention 

Under the direction of Eddie 
Huey, a Northwestern State Col- 
lege student, the Baptist Student 
Union choir presented the special 
music at the opening service of 
the Louisiana Baptist Student Con- 
vention held at the College Place 
Baptist Church in Monroe last 
week. 

Eddie introduced the guest mu- 
sic director, Mr. Dick Baker, evan- 
gelistic singer of Denton, Texas, 
and led the congregational singing 
Friday and Saturday. 

Olivia Rhodes, also a North- 
western student, is serving as edi- 
tor of the state BSU annual. Larry 
Holly, Patricia LuTura, Mickey 
Thompson and Coletta Wilkinson, 
all of NSC, spoke before the gene- 
ral assembly. 



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Democratic Club 
Plans To Organize 
On Every Campus 

The LSU Democratic Club an- 
nounced plans to organize Young 
Democrats chapters on every col- 
lege campus in the State. 

Charles L. Smith, YD vice-presi- 
dent, stated that the Baton Rouge 
organization eventually plans to 
have a federation of Young Demo- 
crat chapters throughout the south. 
Smith stated that he believed, "the 
students of Louisiana colleges are 
politically apathetic for most of 
their stay in college. Political or- 
ganizations are like a four year 
plant that blossoms only during an 
election year." 

Smith emphasized that the LSU 
organization is not interested in 
those who might join the YD's as 
a 1964 political lark. "We intend 
to form a permanent state-wide 
coalition of dedicated Democrats," 
he concluded. 

Students interested in forming 
YD chapters on this campus can 
obtain information by writing the 
LSU Young Democratic Club, The 
LSU Union, Baton Rouge, La. 



Pi Kappa Receives 
17 New Pledges 

Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity receiv- 
ed 17 new pledges during the re- 
cent fraternity rush. These pledges 
are: Charles Thompson, Hollis 
Thompson, Tom Baxter, Charles 
Brown, Dick Fredrich, Ray Ful- 
grium, Mel Prye, Sam Woodward, 
Jerry Flemin, Buddy Durham, Bill 
Boyter, Larry Cook, Tim Post, Tom 
Bye, Ronny Lathum. 

All of these men have joined the 
fraternity football team and are 
eagerly participating in all the 
other activities that have taken 
place thus far. 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 
Gets 23 Pledges 

Tau Kappa Epsilon has ended 
rush and has shown great strides 
in pledging 23 young men. Among 
the members of the pledge class 
are: Stan Branton, J.O. Charrier, 
Milton Rhea, Doyle Williams, Jim 
Tuma, Larry Stark, Larry Deville, 
Walter Pilcher, William Rountree, 
Gust Bridges, Tommy Whitehead, 
Mike Beer, Tom Rowan. 

Dave Webster, Joseph Data, 
Tommy Boone, Gerald Hart, Ken- 
neth Jones, Johnnie Johnson, Ted 
Fowler, Jeff Murphy, Calvin Camp- 
bell, and Lee Harvill. 

All of these boys are surely the 
brand of material that any frater- 
nity would be glad to enter on 
their roster, and the Tekes are 
proud to have them in the fold. 

After having a great time at 
Mom and Dad's Day last week, all 
of the Tekes are looking forward 
to an even better time at the Tech 
weekend in Shreveport. After the 
ball game, most of the chapter 
members plan to attend the TKE 
dance in the Crystal Ballroom of 
the Washington Youree Hotel 
which is sponsored by the mem- 
bers of the fraternity at La. Tech. 

Plans have already begun for 
homecoming weekend which in- 
clude the entrance of a float in the 
homecoming parade. A committee 
of pledges has been set up for the 
planning of this event. Tentative 
plans have also been set for the 
first Teke dance after that game, 
but definite plans have not been 
made. 

All the men of TKE are proud 
of the progress that they have 
made so far this semester, and are 
contemplating even greater suc- 
cess in the future as they become 
better adapted to the brotherhood 
and scholarship offered by Tau 
Kappa Epsilon. 



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Ph. 2381 NATCHITOCHES, LA. 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Students Urged To Attend Assemblies 

The Northwestern State College Students have an unwrit- 
ten law which says that attending assemblies is a foolish prac- 
tice. Class is dismissed, so why should one spend time listening 
to someone give a speech when he can sleep. 

Contrary to popular belief, the speakers employed by the 
Assembly Committee actually are interesting and informative. 
But who cares about that - - one doesn't come to college to get 
an education, does he? 

Yes, it is true that the speakers have to stop in the middle 
ot a sentence, or the speech, usually at the point of climax, be- 
cause the class bell rings. This is unfair to the students, and 
especially to the speaker. Perhaps though, if enough students 
showed interest in assemblies, the administration would allow 
adequate time for the guests to finish their talks. 

This year, the Assembly Committee has worked especially 
hard to put your seventy-five cents, paid at registration for 
this purpose, to good use. However, they cannot force- thev 
can only request students to attend the assemblies 



A Step In The Right Direction 

Following the induction of new officers to the Student 
Council last spring, a committee was formed to study the long 
standing food problem at Northwestern. 

> T ,, Thi s c °mmittee, headed by Joe Traigle, met with Dean 
Nelken, Mr. Fulton, and President Kyser to try to find a solu- 
tion to the poor preparation of food in the dining halls now 
After being told that there was no practical way to improve 
the quality of the food, they set about seeking other solutions 
to the problem. 

The Committee suggested that juniors and seniors be 
allowed to purchase meal tickets at their discression; there- 
fore, giving them the opportunity of deciding whether or not 
to eat in the dining halls and also making it possible to solve 
some of the over-crowded conditions. The Administration 
turned down this proposal but consented to try giving the sen- 
iors this option. 

Students may cancel their meal tickets at any time during 
the semester and receive a refund for the remainder of the 
term. Students who didn't purchase a meal ticket may also 
pick up one at any time during the semester. 

This is not the complete solution to the problem, but it 
does indicate that something is being done to try to improve 
this age-old problem. 



No Editorial Without A Reason 

There has been some comment this week pertaining to the 
absence of an editorial in the October 9 issue of the 'Current 
Sauce.' It should be stated now that it will be the policy of this 
newspaper to print an editorial only when we have something 
definite to say. 

If you have an opinion you would like to express, we wel- 
come guest editorials and will use them whenever possible as 
long as they are in good journalistic taste and are pertinent to 
campus situations. 

It has long been the tradition for editors to criticize some- 
thing every week, and this, too, is going to change. We plan to 
criticize when it is deemed necessary and to praise those act- 
ions worthy of praise. The best way possible to get into trouble 
is to start spouting-off about something that really isn't worth 
saying in the first place. 



Student Council 
Minutes 

Oct. 19, 1964 
The regular meeting of the Nor- 
thwestern Student Council was 
held at 6 p.m. in Bullard Hall. In 
the absence of the President, the 
meeting was called to order by J.O. 
Charrier Vice-President. The roll 
was called, and the minutes of the 
previous meeting were read and 
approved. 

It was announced that five thou- 
sand "Wreck Tech" stickers should 
be delivered in the next few days. 

The council will be unable to ob 
tain the men's gym for its Wed 
nesday night dances; therefore 
the dances will be held in the coli 



Page 3 



Ln5M_MAN ON CAMPUS 



1. 




seum. 

Carolyn Thomas raised the ques 
tion as to whether student direc 
tories were being prepared. It was 
reported that the directories should 
be out in the near future. 

It was suggested that a trophy 
be given to the organization on 
campus which at the end of the 
year had done more than any 
other organization to boost school 
spirit. A discussion of this possibi- 
lity followed. 

Upon returning from a meeting 
in Shreveport, President Blount 
reported that the State Fair Queen, 
her court, and members of the stu- 
dent council would meet Wednes- 
day at 4:35 on the football field to 
rehearse for the pregame ceremo- 
nies. Blount also reported that the 
NSC-Tech parade had been sche- 
duled for 2 p.m. Saturday, October 
24. 

Thursday night the cheerlead- 
ers have a number of activities 
planned for the student body. Af- 
ter a discussion the council sug- 
gested that the events take place 
in the following order. The stu- 
dents would march to town and do 
cheers in front of KNOC. Then re- 
turn to campus and burn the Bull- 
dog at the coliseum. Afterward, 
the Rhythm Dukes will play for a 
dance in the coliseum. Women stu- 
dents will have late permission un- 
til 8:30 p.m. Patsy Gaspard raised 
the question as to what would be 
the proper attire for the women 
students at the dance. Blount will 
check into the matter. 

Jimmy Berry moved that cor- 
sages be purchased for the dates 
of the council members for the 
NSC-Tech banquet. Second by Cal- 
bert Marcantel. Motion passed. 

Blount reported that a letter had 
been received from SUSGA re- 
questing that a vote be taken on 
whether or not Louisiana College 
should be admitted to the South- 
ern Universities Student Govern- 
ment Association. Marcantel mov- 
ed that the council vote to accept 
Louisiana College into SUSGA. 
Second by Milton Rhea. Motion 
passed. 

There being no further business, 
Betty Moore moved that the meet- 
ing be adjourned. Second by Scot- 
ty Maxwell. Meeting adjourned. 

Carolyn Thomas 

Secretary 



Wesminster Club 
Plays Ping Pong 

The Presbyterian Westminster 
Fellowship has crowned a new 
Whole-Hog Champion. The term 
"Whole-Hog" is used with refer- 
ence to the ping-pong player who 
is second to no one in the West- 
minster Fellowship. In the hard 
fought, grimly contested champ- 
ionship series, James Long rooted 
out the victory like the whole-hog 
. . .er, champ he is. He nosed out 
the former champion, Jim Dollar, 
by winning the final game in the 
best of seven series. 

When the Westminister House 
isn't filled with the excitement of 
a ping-pong contest, it's filled with 
other things, such as voices united 
in the spirit of a good ol' Hoote- 
nanny, or the aroma of supper 
brewing in the kitchen, or the 
sounds of a group of students en- 
joying the fellowship of one 
another. 

For that's what WF is; a home 
apart from Mom and Dad; a place 
where the tensions and problems 
of classes and exams can be for- 
gotten; a place where one can 
meet students his age who are in 
trested in him and his worries. 

The Westminister House, 
beside the filling station just 
across from the main gate on Sec- 
ond Street, holds its weekly meet 
ing every Thursday night at 5:30 
at which time supper is served. A 
program of general interest to the 
students follows and lasts about 
thirty minutes. Then there are 
games and bull sessions. 

On Sundays, students meet at 
the WF House and are taken to 
the First Presbyterian Church for 
church services. Sunday school is 
held that night at 7. 

Presbyterians and their friends 
are invited to come and join in 
WF. There are many advantages 
in belonging to Westminister Fel- 
lowship; a member of WF has 
something over everyone else. . . 
only he can hope to be a "Whole- 
Hog." 



LETTERS 



Oct. 12, 1964 
The regular meeting of the 
Northwestern Student Council was 
held at 6 p.m. in Bullard Hall. The 
meeting was called to order by 
Presideent Steve Blount. The roll 
was called and the minutes of the 
previous meeting were read. 

It was brought to the council's 
attention that there were three 
freshman associate positions that 
had not been filled. After a dis- 
cussion, Betty Moore moved that 
the council appoint Jim Leabo, 
Gust Bridges, and Douglas Giles 
to fill the vacancies. Seconded by 
R.J. Ardoin, the motion was pass- 
ed. 

Blount announced that the 
Homecoming dance would be held 
November 14, from 8-12 in the 
men's gym. Blount pointed out the 
fact that Bobby Charles was not 
booked for this date. Marcantel 
moved that the council contract 
Bobby Charles to play for the 
Homecoming dance. Seconded by 
Jimmy Berry, the motion was pass- 
ed. It was suggested that the gym 
be decorated for the dance. The 
freshman class officers and fresh- 
man associates will work with 



chairman Butch Wiggins on decor- 
ating the gym. 

The Wednesday night dances 
will be held at the men's gym. 
Council members working at the 
dance this week will be Branton, 
Moore, Berry, Blount, and Thomas. 

It has been suggeested that the 
council entertain visiting artists, 
such as the "Brandywine Singers", 
at a coffee. 

President Blount reported on 
the meeting at Tech which he and 
Jimmy Berry, J.O. Charrier, Jean 
Walker, and Carolyn Thomas at- 
tended. The council met with mem- 
bers of Tech's Student Senate to 
lay plans for the NSC-Tech week- 
end. The NSC-Tech Banquet will 
be held at 12 noon, Saturday, Oct. 
24, at the Crystal Ballroom of the 
Washington Youree Hotel in Sh- 
reveport. The parade will begin at 
2:30 p.m. and follow the same pa- 
radee route as in 1963. Following 
the parade, there will be the trad- 
itional pep rally. Northwestern will 
have the Milam Street side, same 
ras in 1963. NSC shall occupy the 
east side of the stands. The court 
will be presented at 7:40 p.m. Stu- 
dents will not be allowed on the 
field before the game starts be- 
cause this year the game must 
start on time or the school causing 
the delay will have their team pen- 
alized. 

Blount suggested that a jazz 
band be asked to play at the half 
and during the time outs at the 
basketball games. A discussion 
followed. Betty Moore moved that 
a jazz band be obtained to play at 
the basketball games. Seconded by 
Jean Walker, the motion was 
passed. 

• Barbara Wallace reported that 
the ROTC had a new American 
flag which the council purchased 
last year. It was reported that this 
new flag had been put up. Wallace 
also reported that the library was 
unwilling to remain open longer 
hours on the weekend. 

Calbert Marcantel reported that 
it is too late to organize a pep 
squad this year, but plans are be- 
ing made for one next fall. 

Carolyn Thomas 

Secretary 



Dear Sir: 

Our long-planned scheme to 
make bookstore conditions unbear- 
able was a total success. With the 
help of the faculty and students, 
we were able to increase enroll- 
ment fourteen and one-half per- 
cent. Thus there were unbelieving- 
ly long lines. Of course, long lines 
were only a beginning. In addition, 
we only let in four or five people 
at a time so that the lines would 
move ever so slowly. But there was 
one drawback. At least ninety 
eight percent of our customers got 
the correct books and change. So 
there will be an unavoidable de- 
crease in mixups at the end of the 
semester. But we can't all be per- 
fect. 

Unfortunately, we closed late 
many times because there were 
too many people inside to be help- 
ed. However, we did have the sat- 
isfaction of slamming the door in 
many a rude, but weary, face. On 
especially lucky occasions, the face 
might have belonged to a friend 
(?). This does give one lift. 

The faculty was of immense 
help in our scheme. Instructors 
cheerfully told us not to issue par- 
ticular books until class met. They 
also, in accordance with the 'in- 
crease in enrollment' maneuver, 
underestimated the number of 
books needed for their students. 
Thus we were able to turn scores 
away, as reinforcements for the 
long lines. 

Our last effort was,of course, to 
double the number of clerks work- 
ing and to require all student help 
to work every free hour they had. 
This final detail, not only gave the 
semblance of inefficacy (sic) and 
confusion, but also made the rush 
an ordeal even for those connected 
with the bookstore. 

And now we sit soaking our 
weary feet (and 'Preparing' for 
the end of the semester), we can 
still hear complaints about the in- 
competent bookstore staff. We 
could ask for no better award. 
Thank you 
Shirley Hatfield 



Dear Sir: 

It seems that the only way an 
NSC student can get a decent seat 
at the NSC-Tech game is to belong 
to a fraternity or know someone 
who has access to the better tic- 
kets. All that is left for the aver- 
age NSC student after the "digni- 
taries" and fraternities have pick- 
ed the best seats are those seats 
adjacent to or in the end zone. 

And then we wonder why the 
school doesn't have much "Sport 
Spirit." It's hard to have any when 
you can't even see the game. It's 
hardly worth the while to drive 150 
miles round trip to sit in the end 
zone section because "our" school 
doesn't have enough respect for 
the students to try and obtain bet- 
ter tickets even though we might 
have to pay a little more for them. 
I'm sure the students would be 
glad to pay more for a better seat 
if the tickets were available here 
for them. 

Woodrow Mock 
4-2 



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of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi weekly in the 
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scription $3 the year payable in advance. 

Member of the Associated Collegiate Press 

Duffy Wall Editor-in-Chief 

Sharon Hillman Associate Editor 

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lerry Brill Sports Editor 

lean Wall Society Editor 

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Hoy G. Clark Faculty Adviser 

Editorial Staff: Mary Ellen Davis, V ev 
Hebert, Kenneth Baker. 



Editorials refleci onl\ the oplni>uib ot 
members of the staff The\ do n,.i i .'fleet 
the opinions of the student bod* ■ the 
administration and fat-tit* of the - le«e. 



The Curreoi .*>ho. e pi lots the fie 
partially. It support.-, wh.it it beln 
be right, and oppose* Wh»l ii belii< 
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This paper is printed b\ the Graphic 
Arts Division of the Industrial Edit, ai mi- 
Department of Northwestern 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1964 






Slated to see plenty of action against La. Tech Saturday night are last years 
returning lettermen. They are, from left to right, front row: Gary Pittman, 
Kenny Guillot, Claude Patrick, James Aymond, Al Dodd, and Ed Horton. 
Second row: Bobby Parker, Don Beasley, Allan Plummer, Al Moreau, Grover 



Colvin, Earl Yeamons, Ross Gwinn. Back row: Lawrence Nugent, Richard 
Burlitz, Donnie Carroll, Charles Ragus, Corwyn Aldredge, Fred Fulton, 
Wayne Walker, and Dick Reding. 



Girl's Volleyball 
Tournament Slated 

The first Women's Recreation 
Association Tournament of this 
year, volleyball, will begin Mon- 
day, October 26. Twenty teams and 
two hundred participants are sign- 
ed up for the event, which will be 
a double elimination tournament. 
Games will be played in the Wo- 
men's Gym Monday — Thursday af- 
ternoons until the winner is de- 
cided. The Tournament will begin 
with these games: 
Monday — 4:00, Agnes Morris A vs. 

B.S.U.; 4:45, Louisiana II vs. W. 

Varnado Crazy 8's. 
Tuesday — 4:00, East Varnado I vs. 

Delta Zeta; 4:45, S. Natchitoches 

vs. Carondelet 
Wednesday — 4:45, W. Varnado 1* 

ups vs. Agnes Morris B; 4:45, 

Wesley I vs. Winner Louisiana 

II-W. Varnado Crazy 8. 
Thursday — 4:00, winner Agnes 

Morris A-B.S.U. I vs. Wesley II; 

4:45, W. Varnado Crazy 8 vs. 

Independents. 



Demons Roll Over Ouachita Baptist; 
Set Record For Penalties Received 



Northwestern State scored in 
every quarter and overcame an 
amazing 248 yards in penalties Sat- 
urday night to roll to an easy 48-0 
victory over Ouachita Baptist Col- 
lege. 

Although the Demons were out- 
weighed heavily they scored seven 
touchdowns with three of them 
coming in the first half on passes 
and four more in the second, three 
by rushing and one on a pass in- 
terception. 

Ouachita managed only one 
touchdown which was nullified by 
a penalty while NSC had two six- 
pointers called back because of in- 
fractions. The Demons completed 
10 passes in 25 attempts as they 
racked up their fourth win of the 
season. 

The referees proved to be the 
most active performers in the con- 
test as NSC was penalized 21 times, 
setting a record in total penalties. 
The NSC scoring in the first 



The IMPACTS 

(FORMERLY OF NSC) 

Are Reactivated 

Chuck Fulco (BA-64) & Vincent Arthement (BS-64) 
Co-leaders 
For more information contact 
Chuck Fulco 3456 Hardy Street, Shreveport 

phone 635-7574 




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half of play was divided among 
Gary Pittman, Dick Reding, and 
Monte Ledbetter, each gaining the 
ID on passes. Donnie Carroll was 
on the throwing end of two of the 
scoring plays while Don Beasley 
added the third. 

Claude Patrick led all scorers 
with two touchdowns on runs of 6 
and 5 yards. Floyd added six 
points to the score with a one yard 
plunge and Al Moreau wrapped up 
the scoring with a 30 yard pass in- 
terception. Jimmy Scott's kick 
proved true on 6 of 7 PAT at- 
tempts. 

Scoring Summary 

NSC 7 13 14 14-48 

Ouachita 0-0 



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Free Transportation To And From 
The College - 8 A.M. - 11 A.M. 

SIX POOL TABLES 
(Brunswick, Gold Crown) 

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Shuffle Board — Domino Tables 
Moon Tables — Bowling Tables 
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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 5 



Demon Tech Wreckers 




Corwyn Aldredge 
Left End 
6'4"; 235 lbs. 



Ross Gwinn 
Left Tackle 
6'3"; 252 lbs. 



Grover Colvin 

Left Guard 
5' 11"; 190 lbs. 



Fred Fulton 

Center 
6'5"; 207 lbs. 



Lawrence Nugent 
Right Guard 
5'11"; 218 lbs. 



Charles Ragus 
Right Tackle 
6'4"; 263 lbs. 



Dick Reding 
Right End 
6'0"; 201 lbs. 




Claude Patrick 

Fullback 
5'8"; 195 lbs. 




NORTHWESTERN STATE COLLEGE football coaches for the current campaign are pic- don Reynolds, student trainer, Don McCardle, equipment 
tured above, left to right. Gene Knecht, A.C. (Red) Phillips, Head Coach Jack Clayton, manager, Billy Eugene Christmas, trainer; front row: Ted 
Alvin (Cracker) Brown, and Ernest (Slim) Howell. Fowler and Gerald Long, student trainers. 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAJCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1964 




Mr. Donald McKenzie, acting librarian, receives a group 
of slides depicting the growth of the pulp and paper in- 
dustry in Louisiana. Presenting the slides to him is Mr. 
Lin Zulick, area forest superintendent, International Pa- 
per Company. 



Library Receives Slides, Recordings 
From International Paper Company 



Mr. Lin Zulick, area forest sup- 
erintendent for International Pa- 
per Company, and Mr. Don Powell, 
regional conservation forester, 
IPC, presented 125 color film 
slides and a tape recording, "Trees 
of Life: 25 Years of the Southern 
Pulpwood Conservation," to the 
Louisiana Room, Russell Library, 
October 14. 

"Trees of Life" traces the re- 
markable history of the develop- 



Sigma Tau Delta 
Holds Reception 

Nu Iota Chapter of Sigma Tau 
Delta, national honorary English 
fraternity, held an informal recep- 
tion honoring the English majors 
and the English faculty last Thurs- 
day evening in the Home Econom- 
ics Building. 

The refreshments, which con- 
sisted of home-made cookies, 
doughnuts and punch, were served 
to about a hundred guests. Host- 
esses for the tea were Dr. Marie 
Fletcher, and Miss Mary McEniry, 
advisers of the fraternity. 

Also attending were Ingrid Fa- 
ber, Martha Sers, Carolyn Oglesby, 
Lenora Manning, Mary Frances 
Lowe, Bonnie Frazier, Brenda 
Odom, Mary Lou Neal, Laura Pyle, 
Ginger Risley, and Carla Paul, 
members of Sigma Tau Delta. 

The purpose of the tea was to 
acquaint English majors on camp- 
us with members of Sigma Tau 
Delta, with members of the Eng- 
lish faculty, and with one another. 

Those eligible for membership 
are English majors who have main- 
tained an overall academic average 
of "B", who have maintained an 
average of "B" for English courses 
pursued, and who have attained 
the classification of second-semes- 
ter sophomore or higher. 




'Specializing In 
Hair Shaping" 

TRESSIES 
Beauty Salon 

For Appointments 

Call 4536 And Visit 

Tressie Watts 
Elsie Hernandez 
Irma Courtney 
Jean Boucher 



ment of the forest resources of the 
South and of the forest-based pulp 
and paper industry. This audio- 
visual presentation was prepared 
initially by the Southern Pulp- 
wood Conservation Association for 
its silver anniversary meeting this 
year. 

The development of the pulp and 
paper industry in the south from 
a few mills and a very limited 
market for pulpwood to today's 80 
mills, which pay $20 million dol- 
lars per week for pulpwood and 
payrolls alone, is traced in "Trees 
of Life." 

Mr. Donald MacKenzie, Acting 
Librarian, said that these audio- 
visual materials represented a val- 
uable addition to the Library's 
oral history collection and that 
they would be very useful to stu- 
dents in the departments of For- 
estry, Business Administration, 
and Social Sciences. An early show- 
ing of the "Trees of Life" for NSC 
students and the general public is 
planned. 



Louisiana Room 
Gets Rare Print 

The Louisiana Room of Russell 
Library has recently acquired a 
rare colored print of the Battle of 
Oak Hills, fought on August 10, 
1861. A special library fund do- 
nated by Mrs. Gertrude Bott Sau- 
cier of Baton Rouge made the pur- 
chase possible. 

The old print is full of color and 
surging action. Federal General 
Nathaniel Lyon is depicted lead- 
ing a wildly charging Iowa Regi- 
ment into action against the Con- 
federate forces. 

The Battle of Oak Hills (Which 
the Yankees called the Battle of 
Wilson's Creek) was fought near 
Springfield, Missouri. Hebert's 
Third Louisianan Regiment, in 
which many North Louisiana men 
served, fought valiantly in this ac- 
tion. The story is told that when 
the rumor that the fiery little Gen- 
eral Lyon had issued from Spring- 
field and was about to surround 
the Confederate forces, one of the 
boys remarked that "it didn't make 
much difference to the Louisiana 
boys which side he attacked them 
on, as they were so far from home 
all points of the compass seemed 
alike to them." 

In this battle, a "Lt. Lacy sp- 
rang on a log, waving his sword, 
and called 'Come on, Caddo!' ". 
Gen. Lyon was killed, and a bril- 
lant Confederate victory resulted. 

The old print is currently on ex- 
hibit in the Louisiana Room to- 
gether with other momentos of 
the same battle: the unique, hand- 
made flag of the Third Louisiana 
Regiment with the words, "Oak 
Hills" embroidered on one of the 
crossed bars; the musical composi- 
tion, "Oak Hill Marche Triomoph- 
ale," by Coralie Buard of Natchi- 
tochees; and the dirge by James 
Ryder Randall (the author of 
"Maryland! My Maryland!") writ- 
ten upon the occasion of the death 
of Placide Bossier, who was killed 
in action at the Battle of Oak 
Hills. 



Institute Of Foreign Study Slates 
Opening Of Foreign Study Grants 



LET'S WRECK TECH 

If The College Bookstore Does 
Not Have It We'll Get It. 



BAKER'S BOOK STORE 

Next to LeRendezvous 
'NSC's Favorite Bookstore' 



SPECIAL TO COLLEGE STUDENTS 

^ ... 5x7 . . . Portrait plus 8 wallet size . . . $4.75 
1 ... 8x10 .. . Portrait plus 16 wallet size . . . $7.00 
WE DO NOT HAVE A SITTING CHARGE 



UHRBACH'S STUDIO 

(Your Potpourri Photographer) 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 

NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 
Phones — 5556 — 5557 



Application periods for under- 
graduate foreign study in Paris, 
Madrid, Vienna, and Freiburg, 
West Germany, will open Monday, 
the Institute of European Studies 
has announced. 

All four Institute centers will 
offer both spring semester, 1965; 
and full-year, 1965-66 programs 
for students in history, political 
science, modern languages and 
literatures, philosophy, and other 
liberal arts and social science 
fields. The programs are designed 
for college juniors, but some soph- 
omores are admitted in Paris and 
Vienna. 

Formal applications are due 
Dec. 7 for next spring's programs 
and May 10, 1965, for full-year 
programs starting next fall. Sail- 
ings are set for Feb. 1 and late Au- 
gust or mid-September. All pro- 
grams end in late June or July. 

To supplement the courses stu- 
dents take in the European uni- 
versity, the Institute's Madrid, Pa- 
ris and Vienna centers, each offer 
from 34 to 55 courses taught by 
European university professors in 
fields ranging from art history to 
sociology and theology. Except in 
Vienna,, where a number of cour- 
ses are taught in English for stu- 
dents still brushing up on their 
German, all instruction is in the 
native language. 

Because University of Paris 
courses last the full year, and do 
not admit new registrants for the 
second semester, students in the 



spring-semester program there will 
be unable to attend regular uni- 
versity lectures. Instead, they will 
concentrate on language develop- 
ment and French-taught courses 
organized specifically for Ameri- 
can students. 

In Freiburg, the principal town 
in Germany's Black Forest, Insti- 
tute students take all their work 
with German students in the 500- 
year-old university, described as 
"a graduate school by U.S. stan- 
dards." They receive as much as 
one hour of tutorial assistance for 
every hour of lecture they attend. 

For its Vienna programs, the 
Institute has introduced a new re- 
quirement of at least a semester of 
college German or a year of Ger- 
man in high school. These pro- 
grams also require a C-plus college 
grade average. 

All the other centers require a 
B average and one or two years of 
th appropriate language. Appli- 
cants must also have the approval 
of their U.S. colleges and univer- 
sities. 

Students in all the centers live 
in private European homes or in 
European student dormitories. Be- 
fore regular classes begin, they are 
given from four to seven weeks of 
intensive language training. The 
programs also include orientation, 
meals, and two field trips under 
European university lecturers. 

Descriptive literature is obtain- 
able from the Institute of Europe- 
an Studies, 35 E. Wacker Drive, 
Chicago, 111. 



BREWER'S SH0ELAND 

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 




Page 7 



Patti Graham 

Patricia Graham 
Is Majorette 

Serving as a majorette this year 
with the Demon Band is Patti 
Graham, of Natchitoches. In addi- 
tion to her activities as majorette, 
she is a member of Delta Zeta and 
SLTA. Patti is majoring in prim- 
ary education. 



Demon Basketball 
Schedule Released 

Northwestern's new air-condi- 
tioned 5000-seat Coliseum, com- 
pleted last spring, will be the set- 
ting for this year's 26-game bas- 
keball schedule. 

The Demons open with a two- 
game series against Coach Bloom- 
er Sullivan's Southeastern Okla- 
homa Savages. Sullivan, after 27 
years, ranks among the top five 
winning coaches in the nation. His 
Oklahoma teams are always tough 
and will provide formidable foes 
for the Demons as they try their 
new "home." 

Fourteen home games are in- 
cluded in the 1964-65 slate an- 
nounced by Coach Huey W. Cran- 
ford, after approval by the Ath- 
letic Council. Newcomers are La- 
mar Tech, Delta State, and Ogle- 
thorpe University. The Demons 
play home and home contests a- 
gainst five Gulf States Conference 
opponents and vie with Southeast- 
ern Oklahoma, Nicholls, Louisiana 
College, Lamar Tech, Stephen F. 
Austin, Delta State, Southern Miss- 
issippi, Ogethorpe, and Centenary. 

The 1964-65 schedule: 
Nov. 27, Southeastern Okla., home 
Nov. 28, Southeastern Okla., home 
Dec. 1, Nicholls State, home 
Dec. 5, Louisiana College, home 
Dec. 7, Lamar Tech, away 
Dec. 12, Nicholls State, away 
Dec. 14, Delta State, away 
Dec. 17, Lamar Tech, home 
Dec. 30, Stephen F. Austin, away 
Jan. 2, Southwestern La, away 
Jan. 5, Southeastern, home 
Jan. 6, Southern Mississippi, home | 
Jan. 8, McNeese State, home 
Jan. 12, Northeast State, away 
Jan. 16, Oglethorpe Univ., home 
Jan. 23, Centenary, home 
Jan. 28, Louisiana Tech, home 
Feb. 2, Southwestern La., home 
Feb. 4, Southern Mississippi, away 
Feb. 6, Southeastern, away 
Feb. 8, Centenary, away 
Feb. 13, McNeese State, home 
Feb. 16, Northeast State, home 
Feb. 23, Louisiana Tech, away 
March 1, Louisiana College, away 



Study Grants To Be Awarded 
By National Science Foundation 



The National Academy of Sci- 
ences-National Research Council 
has been called upon again to ad- 
vise the National Sciences Founda- 
tion in the selection of candidates 



Intramural Schedule 


1964-65 




ENTRY DEADLINE PLAY BEGINS 


Touch Football 


October 1 


October 8 


Table Tennis 


October 20 


October 28 


Bowling 


October 26 


Determined by 




Bowling Alley 


Volleyball 


October 29 


November 9 


Cross Country 


November 16 


November 19 


Gymnastics 


January 11 


January 14 


Badminton 


February 8 


February 11 


Paddleball 


February 15 


February 18 


Basketball 


March 1 


March 4 


Free Throw 


March 29 


April 1 


Tennis 


April 26 


April 29 


Softball 


April 26 


April 29 


Track and Field 


May 10 


May 13 


Swimming 


May 17 


May 20 


The Intramural Jamboree will be held 


on October 6. 




Gordon Ferguson 

Ferguson Serving 
As Drum Major 

Serving as head drum major for 
the Demon band for his fourth 
consecutive year is Gordon Fergu- 
son. Gordon is a senior music edu- 
cation major from Shreveport. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
SERVICES 
Old Lemee House 
Jefferson St. 
Every Sunday 1 1 :00 A.M. 
All are welcome 



Catering to those who 
care about the health and 
beauty of their hair 

CHARM 
BEAUTY SHOP 

One-half Block 
From The Campus 

Phone 3948 114 Lee St. 
Open Monday Noon Till 
Saturday Noon 



for the Foundation's program of 
the receipt of applications for 
graduate fellowships is December 
11, 1964, and for regular postdoc- 
toral fellowships, December 14 
1964. 

graduate and regular postdoctoral 
fellowships. Committees of out- 
standing scientists appointed by 
the Academy-Research Council will 
evaluate applications of all candi- 
dates. Final selection will be made 
by the Foundation, with awards to 
be announced on March 15, 1965. 

Fellowships will be awarded for 
study in the mathematical, physi- 
cal, medical, biological and engi- 
neering sciences; also in anthrop- 
ology, economics (excluding busi- 
ness administration), geography, 
the history and philosophy of sci- 
ence, linguistics, political science, 
psychology (excluding clinical psy- 
chology), and sociology (not in- 
cluding social work). They are 
open to college seniors, graduate 
students working toward a degree, 
postdoctoral students, and others 
with equivalent training and ex- 
perience. All applicants must be 
citizens of the United States and 
will be judged solely on the basis 
of ability. 

Applicants for the graduate 
awards will be required to take 
the Graduate Record Examina- 
tions designed to test scientific ap- 
titude and achievement. The exam- 
inations, administered by the Edu- 
cational Testing Service, will be 
1 given on January 16, 1965, at de- 
signated centers. 

The annual stipends for gradu- 
ate Fellows are as follows: $2400 
for the first level; $2600 for the 
intermediate level; and $2800 for 
the terminal level. The annual sti- 
pend for postdoctoral Fellows is 
$5500. Limited allowances will also 
be provided to apply toward tui- 
tion, laboratory fees, and travel. 

Further information and appli- 
cation materials may be obtained 
from the Fellowship Office, Na- 
tional Academy of Sciences-Na- 
tional Research Council, 2101 Con- 
stitution Avenue, N.W., Washing- 
ton, D.C. 20418. The deadline for 




Nancy Clayton 
Demon Majorette 

Nancy Clayton, pictured above, 
is currently serving as a North- 
western State College Demon Band 
majorette. 

A resident of Natchitoches, Nan- 
cy will travel to Shreveport this 
week-end for the annual North- 
western State-Louisiana Tech State 
Fair game as a member of the NSC 
State Fair Court 



OPEN 
24 HOURS A DAY 

Let's Beat Tech 
MURPHY'S RESTAURANT 

1215 WASHINGTON ST. PHONE 2609 



WESLEY 
Foundation 

SUNDAY 

9:00 A.M.— Coffee 
9:30 A.M. — Forum 
6:00 P.M.— Bible Study 

WEDNESDAY 

5:00 P.M.— Supper 
5:45 P.M.— Program & Wor- 
ship 

FRIDAY 

7:30 A.M. — Morning Vespers 

OFFICE HOURS 

10:00 AM— 12 Noon 
1:00 P.M.— 2:30 P.M. 



Shop SANDEFUR'S JEWELERS 

Watches - Rings- 
Jewelry Of All Kinds 

NOW AT BIG DISCOUNT 
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DEMONS 
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McCLUNG DRUG STORE 

Front & Church Sts. phone 2461 

Serving Natchitoches and NSC since 1891 

FREE DELIVERY TO ALL COLLEGE DORMS 



Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1964 





BY, U£RW BRILL 



Its that time of year again. The 
weather is getting cooler, the Lou- 
isiana State Fair is moving to Sh- 
reveport, and chants of "Wreck 
Tech" are filling the air. This years 
battle is shaping up to be one of 
the biggest and most important 
games of the year for either team. 
The winner will be heavily favor- 
ed to walk away with the GSC title. 
Tech has been receiving national 
rankings in the small college polls 
as they have rated as high as third 
in the nation. The Demons have 
also been included in the ratings 
and have also climbed into the top 
ten earlier in the year. This years 
game looks to break all attendance 
records as the game has become 
one of the top football classics in 
North Louisiana. 

Here are some odds and ends 
about the Tech Game. Since 1907 
there have been only four ties, all 
of them by a score of 0-0. Tech has 
compiled the longest winning st- 
reak in the series, from 1945-1952, 
a total of nine games. Northwest- 
ern's longest winning streak has 
been three games, those victories 
occuring from 1938-1940. In 1944 
and 1945, there were two games a 
year played. The Demons didn't 
fare too well then as they were 
only able to muster a tie in one of 
the games. The Demons have been 
held scoreless in fourteen games 
while they have held Tech score- 
less in ten games. The worse score 
ever compiled by Tech against the 
Demons was in 1911 when the De- 
mons lost 39-0. The Demons best 
trouncing given to Tech was 33-0 
with that occuring in 1932. The De- 
mons have been evenly matched 
against the Techmen since 1958. 
Since then they have split evenly 
with three wins apiece and both 
teams scoring the same amount of 
points, 90. 

Last weeks totals on football 
predictions ended up with eleven 
right and three wrong for an aver- 
age of .786. The closest game, 
score wise, was the McNeese game 
who won by 15 with this column 
picking them to win by 14. For 
the year this column is 25-6 with 
an average of .806. Here goes ano- 
ther try: 

NSC (6) over La. Tech - - North- 
westerns overall offense proves to 
be a shade stronger than that of 
Tech. The whole game rests on the 
Demons pass defense. Look for the 
score to be 20-14. 
Southeastern (20) over North- 
east - - - Indians are due for a big 
week but this doesn't look like it. 



USL (13) over La. College - - - 
Bulldogs from Lafayette have start- 
ed their move but the Wildcats are 
capable of clawing up a big vic- 
tory. 

Memphis (14) over McNeese - - - 
Cowboys don't have enough ammu- 
nition. 

Arkansas (35) oyer Wichita - - - 
Just a warmup game. 
LSU (14) over Tennessee - - - Ti- 
gers romp and stomp as they climb 
into the top five in the nation. 
Alabama (7) over Florida - - - 
This could be the Tides chance to 
become number one. 
Georgia Tech (12) over Tulane - - 
The Green Wave has shown that 
they are capable of putting up a 
fight. 

Texas (7) over Rice - - - Owls fall 
short again against their number 
one opponent. 

Mississippi (20) over Vanderbilt - - 
Rebels have little trouble. Still mad 
over two defeats. 
Around the nation: 
Notre Dame (15) over Stanford 
Ohio State (7) over Wisconsin 
Georgia (1) over Kentucky 
Baylor (7) over Texas A&M 
Mississippi State (20) over Hous- 
ton. 



Demons, Bulldogs To Meet Saturday 
In North Louisiana's Biggest Game 




Plummer Receives 
Stagg Award 

Winner of this weeks Alonzo 
Stagg Award for his action against 
the Ouachita Baptist Tigers is mid- 
dle linebacker Allen Plummer. 
Plummer is a member of the Blue 
Unit, defensive specialist. 

Named to the honor roll for this 
game were 24 players. Those mak- 
ing the honor roll on both offense 



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768 Front St. 



Phone 9475 



Northwestern State College's 
powerful Demons face a big task 
this week as they travel to Shreve- 
port to battle the Bulldogs of La. 
Tech. Both teams support fine re- 
cords but records mean nothing in 
a game like this. La. Tech has 
posted a perfect record of five 
wins and no loses, included in this 
is a 19-6 victory over Arlington. 
The Bulldog's performances this 
year have earned them a rating 
of number six in the nation among 
small colleges. 

The series between the two 
clubs is one of the oldest rivalries 
in the state. Tech holds the de- 
cisive edge as they have won 31 
and lost only 13. Four of the games 
have ended in ties. 

Last year's game saw Tech set up 
a tough defense, and Billy Laird 
complete a barrage of passes to 
give the Bulldogs a 27-13 victory. 
The Demons were unable to mus- 
ter a ground or an air attack. The 
first half proved to be the differ- 
ence as the Demons played on 
even terms for the rest of the 
game. 

The Demons have a balanced of- 
fense as 14 players carried the ball. 
Six of these players are averaging 
5.0 yards or better per carry. Lead- 
ing ground gainer for the Demons 
is halfback James Aymond. Ay- 
mond has carried the ball 21 times 
for a total of 230 yards and a 
fantastic average of 10.9 yards per 
carry. Claude Patrick and Ed Hor- 
ton have been the work horses for 
the Demons as each has carried 
the ball 45 times. Patrick has gain- 
ed 219 yards while Horton has 
picked up 150. 

Leading passer for the Demons 
is quarterback Don Beasley. Beasl- 
ey has thrown the ball 36 times for 



and defense were Al Dodd, Arthur 
Floyd, Hubert Adams, George Cog- 
nevich and James Aymond. Others 
making the offensive roll were 
Dick Reding, Ross Gwinn, Al Mo- 
reau, Monty Ledbetter, Jimmy 
Woods, Eddie Mittlebronn, Don 
Beasley, Ed Horton, Corwyn Al- 
dredge, Donnie Carrol, Joe Beas- 
ley, and Gary Schouest. 

Named to the defensive honor 
roll were Plummer, Fred Fulton, 
Lawrence Nugent, Bobby Parker, 
Kenny Guillot, and Mike Creel. 



CHIEF DRIVE-IN 



Now Showing 



"ISLAND OF THE 
BLUE DOLPHINS" 
color 



Saturday's 
Double Feature 



Two Elvis Presley greats. . 
in color 

"KID GALAHAD" 

and 

"FOLLOW THAT DREAM' 



Sun.-Mon.-Tues. 



Academy Award Winner 
BEST PICTURE! 
Alec Guiness 
Jack Hawkins 
Peter O'Toole 

'LAWRENCE OF ARABIA' 
color 



Wednesday 
'BUCK NIGHT' 



'STRANGERS WHEN 
WE MEET" 
Kirk Douglas 
Kim Novak 

— PLUS — 

"BACK STREET" 
Susan Hayward 
John Gavin 
Both in Color 



20 completions and 391 yards gain 
and three T.D. Leader in touch- 
down passes is Donnie Carroll with 
four. Leading receivers for the 
Demons are James Aymond and 
Dick Reding. Aymond has hauled 
in 10 for 198 yards and two T.D.'s 
while Reding has caught eight for 
142 yards and also two T.D.'s. 

Al Dodd is the team's leading 
pass interceptor as he has stolen 
three and returned them for a to- 
tal of 76 yards. Al Moreau has re- 
turned one interception for a 
touchdown. Dodd also leads the 
team in punt and kickoff returns. 
Dodd has returned six punts for 
98 yards and a 16.3 yard average. 
He has returned three kickoffs 
back for 106 yards and a 35.3 yard 
average. 

Wayne Walker is the Demon's 
punter. Wayne has kicked the ball 
nine times for a total of 342 yards. 
He is averaging 38.0 yards per 
kick. 

Northwestern has a total of 13 
players who figure in the scoring. 
Leading scorer is James Aymond 
who has scored 20 points. Jimmy 
Scott has showed the value of his 
toe as he has kicked 13 extra 
points and two field goals for a to- 
tal of 19 points. Ed Horton and 
Claude Patrick are tied for third 
with 18 points apiece. 

The probable starting lineup 
for the Demons will be as follows: 
Corwyn Aldredge and Dick Reding 
at ends; Ross Gwinn and Charles 
Ragus at tackles; Grover Colvin 



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Starring 
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Coming 
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and Lawrence Nugent at guards; 
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Sat. & Sun 12:45 



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VOL. LI— No. 8 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Faculty Members 
Attend Convention 

Three members of the NSC mu- 
sic faculty will be among those ap- 
pearing on the program of the ann- 
ual Louisiana Music Teachers As- 
sociation convention to be held at 
Centenary College this week. 

Appearing on a panel discussion 
in the piano section will be Miss 
Eleanor Brown, assistant professor 
of music. The topic of the discus- 
sion will be "Some Problems of 
Piano Teaching." Miss Brown's re- 
marks will deal with "Building a 
Repertoire." Miss Brown holds de- 
grees from NSC and LSU, and has 
done work toward a doctorate at 
Indiana University. 

Miss Lois Bartlett, soprano and 
instructor of voice at Northwest- 
ern, will be featured in recital 
during a Voice Section meeting. 
She will sing works by Mahler, Ni- 
colai, Debussy and Copland, and 
will be accompanied by Dr. Abram 
M. Plum, assistant professor of 
music. 

Miss Bartlett, who joined the 
NSC faculty last February, has de- 
grees from Southwestern Univer- 
sity of Georgetown, Texas, and the 
University of Texas. She has ap- 
peared in numerous operatic roles 
and recitals in Texas and Louis- 
iana. Last February she sang the 
role of Ortrud in the Shreveport 
Symphony production of Wagner's 
opera "Lohengrin" and next sp- 
ring will perform in the same 
group's production of "Boris Go- 
dounov." This past summer Miss 
Bartlett sang with the Dallas Sum- 
mer Musicals. 

In addition to acompanying 
Miss Bartlett, Dr. Plum will appear 
as piano soloist, performing works 
by composers living in Louisiana. 
The Louisiana Composers Program 
is always a highlight of the LMTA 
Convention. 

Dr. Plum has bachelor's, mas- 
ter's and doctoral degrees from the 
State University of Iowa. He is an 
accomplished pianist and, since 
coming to Northwestern two years 
ago, has taught piano, music the- 
ory and music history. He has stu- 
died composition with Luigi Dal- 
lapiccola in New York and taught 
in the New York area before com- 
ing to Louisiana. 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1964 




Associated Women Students Officers currently serving at Northwestern State College 
are (top row) Kate Thibodeaux, president; Irby McCan, vice president; Becky Alphin, 
IAWS representative; Carolyn Brewer, corresponding secretary; (bottom row) Barbara 
Wallace, recording secretary; Priscilla Dorgan, treasurer; Lynette Griffin, publicity 
chairman; Mary Ann Jones, social chairman. 



Senator Ellender 
To Speak Here, 
Will Show Slides 

Louisiana Senator Allen J. Ell- 
ender will be in Natchitoches Mon- 
day where he will make two app- 
earances. 

The senator will present a lec- 
ture on Africa which will be illus- 
trated with motion pictures from 
his personal collection in the Fine 
Arts Auditorium at 8 p.m. The as- 
sembly is open to the public which 
is cordially invited to attend. 

In addition to the college assem- 
bly, Senator Ellender has also 
scheduled a noon talk before a 
joint meeting of the Natchitoches 
Lions and Rotarians at the Broad- 
moor Restaurant. 



Students Finish Honors Math Course 



Placement Office 
Sets Interviews 

Wednesday, November 4, brings 
representatives of three organi- 
zations to the Placement Office 
for the purpose of interviewing 
prospective employees. 

The Federal Career Service will 
conduct interviews with students 
of all backgrounds, answering all 
questions and advising them of ca- 
reer opportunities in Federal Ci- 
vil Service. These appointments to 
positions are made regardless of 
race, religion, sex, creed, national 
origin, or political affiliation. 

The Shreveport Veteran's Ad- 
ministration will send two repre- 
sentatives to interview graduating 
seniors in the field of Business Ad- 
ministration. 

The Social Security office will 
interview students from all depart- 
ments for employment in that 
field. 

Appointments for these inter- 
views may be made with Mr. Joe 
W. Webb, Director of Placement, 
in Room 19, Caldwell Hall. 



1 



Law Scholarship Available 

A full tuition scholarship to Tu- 
lane Law School will be offered 
to some Northwestern student in 
the fall semester of 1965. Anyone 
interested should contact Mrs. 
Jane Nahm at her office in room 
201E of Guardia Hall before the 
Thanksgiving vacation. The North- 
western faculty will determine the 
winner from the list of applica- 
tions. 



State Publication 
Has Two Articles 
About College 

The October issue of "Louisiana 
Schools" is featuring two articles 
relating to the Summer Institute 
on the Slow Learner sponsored by 
the Special Education Department 
at Northwestern State College last 
summer. 

The two articles, entitled "Slow 
Learners - - Exceptional Children" 
by Hurst M. Hall, of the Special 
Education Department, and "The 
School Work Adjustment Program 
for Slow Learners" by Mrs. Louise 
Bacle, one of the institute graduat- 
es, explain the program for slow 
learners. 

The institute this summer pro- 
vided 20 teachers trained for teach- 
ing slow learners on the high 
school level. These teachers are 
presently instituting class room 
programs in their respective par- 
ishes. 



Gerber Lecturer 
To Speak At NSC 

Mr. Norman Hurley, assistant di- 
rector of research at Gerber Pro- 
ducts of Fremont, Michigan will be 
the guest lecturer at the Depart- 
ment of Microbiology Seminar on 
November 12. 

Beginning at 7 p.m. in room 108 
of Williamson Hall, Mr. Hurley 
will speak on "Opportunities in the 
Baby Food Industry." Included on 
his agenda will be the showing of 
slides of the new research facilities 
of the Gerber Company. 

The non-technical seminar is 
open to the public. There is no ad- 
mission charge. 



Dr. William E. Timon, head of 
the Mathematics Department at 
Northwestern State College, has 
announced the completion of a 
mathematics honors course by 
18 NSC students. 

Students were placed in the 
course based on their superior a- 
chievement in freshman entrance 
tests and were required to make a 
grade of "C" or better in order to 

General Winton 
Presents Awards 

Brig. Gen. W. F. Winton Jr., de- 
puty commander at Ft. Polk, was 
on the Northwestern State College 
campus Thursday to make disting- 
uished military student awards to 
four ROTC cadets. 

Gen. Winton arrived at Natchi- 
toches Airport at 11:30 a.m. where 
he was met by an honor guard, the 
Black Knights, NSC's precision 
drill team. 

At 1:15 p.m. during ceremonies 
on the drill field, DMS awards were 
made to Cadet Capt. Robert R. 
Port of Natchitoches, Cadet Lt. Col. 
Milton J. Gaspard of Cottonport, 
Cadet Capt. William Addison of 
Shreveport, and Cadet Major Tho- 
mas Putnam of Merryville before 
a formation of the entire corps. 

Those taking part in the cere- 
monies, in addition to the general, 
were Dr. George A. Stokes, dean 
of the school of arts and sciences; 
Dr. Leo T. Allbritton, dean of in- 
struction, and Major M. L. Burn, 
who read the order of the day. 

Following the presentation of 
awards the Black Knights passed 
in review. 



Special Education 
Sets Conference 

The Department of Special Edu- 
cation at NSC will sponsor a 
School-Work Conference, Friday 
in Bullard Hall. 

Participants in the conference 
will be members of the 1964 Sum- 
mer Institute for Teachers of the 
Slow Learner, parish administra- 
tors and supervisors, and key auth- 
orities in the fields of special edu- 
cation and vocational rehabilita- 
tion. 

Authorities invited are the Lou- 
isiana and Texas State Supervisors 
of Special Education, the Louisiana 
State Director of Vocational Re- 
habilitation, the Orleans Parish 
Director of Vocational Education 
and the State representative of Sci- 
ence Research Associates. 



receive credit. Successful comple- 
tion of this course also satisfied 
the requirements necessary to re- 
ceive credit for Mathematics 103. 

Receiving credit for the course 
are Mary Beth Andries and Robert 
K. Smith Smith of Many; Carson 
Gene Balzrette and Donald C. 
Turnbow of Shreveport; and Ed- 
ward L. Bouriague of Creole. 

Thomas R. Cousins, Wayman W. 
Ham, Jr., and Kenneth Stephens of 
Natchitoches; Raymond T. Gass of 
Hornbeck; Dana T. Mosely of New 
Roads; Charles W. Penrod of Robe- 
line; and Hodge M. Raburn of 
Coushatta. 

Karen Sue Schamber of Basile; 
Charles W. Seaman of Thibodaux; 
Mary L. Stovall of Elizabeth; Ken- 
neth D. Valentine of Urania; Lin- 
da K. Webb of Bossier; and Thom- 
as N. Whitehead of Zachary. 

Blood Needed 

Mrs. Lucy Straughan needs to 
have 54 pints of blood replaced. A 
Blood Bank unit from Lafayette 
will be at the Natchitoches Parish 
Hospital on Saturday, November 
7 between 10 and 12 a.m. All per- 
sons interested in donating blood 
must have had something for 
breakfast before they come to the 
blood bank. 



Teacher Council 
Organized Here 

The Council on Teacher Educat- 
ion, a newly activated body on the 
Northwestern State College cam- 
pus, held an organizational meet- 
ing Wednesday. 

The members of the committee 
were appointed by President John 
S. Kyser and the function of the 
council is to serve as a coordinat- 
ing and policy-making body con- 
cerned with the broad aspects of 
the education of teachers at NSC. 
The group will operate within the 
regulations prescribed by the Coll- 
ege and the State Board of Educat- 
ion. 

Specific purposes of the Council 
are: 

a. To develop and recommend 
policy relative to teacher educat- 
ion programs. 

b. To coordinate teacher edu- 
cation through study, development, 
and implementation of procedure 
relative to (1) selective recruit- 
ment, (2) selective admission, (3) 
advisement, (4) retention, (5) lab- 
oratory experiences, and (6) pro- 
gram development. 

c. To study, encourage, and faci- 
litate cooperative development of 
programs in various teaching 
fields. 

d. To serve as agent in present- 
ing teacher education programs to 
the State Department of Education 
and to other accrediting agencies. 

e. To initiate research and pro- 
mote studies designed to lead to 
the improvement of teacher ed- 
ucation. 

Dr. Guy W. Nesom, dean of the 
School of Education will serve the 
group as chairman and Dr. Lisso 
Simmons, head of the Department 
of Education, will serve as secre- 
tary; both are ex-officio members 
as is Dr. Leo T. Allbritten, dean of 
the Graduate School and of In- 
struction. 

Members of the Council on 
Teacher Education include Dr. 
Marie Dunn, head of the Home 
Economics Department; Dr. W.G. 
Erwin, head of the Biological Sci- 
ences; Dr. LeRoi Eversull, associ- 
ate professor of social sciences, 
and Dr. Mary Jo Harris, assistant 
professor of education. 

Also serving on the Council are: 
Miss Mary McEniry, assistant pro- 
fessor of English; Dr. John E. 
Morrow, assistant professor of 
education; Dr. John B. Robson, 
professor of education; Dr. Charles 
F. Thomas, head of Health, Physi- 
cal Education and Recreation, and 
Russell Whittington, associate pro- 
fessor of mathematics. 



Shreveport Police Praise Students 

Dear Dean Nichols: 

Will you please extend to the Northwestern State student 
body, on behalf of the Shreveport Police Department by the 
undersigned, our sincere appreciation for the manner in which 
they conducted themselves during the parade, pep meeting 
and football game between Northwestern and Louisiana Tech 
last Saturday. 

Cooperation and willingness to work with the Police Offi- 
cers showed a decided improvement over the past year, and it 
was most helpful. As you will recall, we had a little confusion 
last year and the students were, more or less, on probation. The 
attitude they displayed this year makes us believe their con- 
duct will continually improve and so we may look forward to 
having the Northwestern State parade and Pep meeting in the 
future. 

Congratulations - even though Northwestern did not win 
their game, they showed great spirit— played a fine game and 
please remember you have our very best wishes for continued 
success. 

Sincerely 

E. A. McDowell, Captain 
Special Service Division 
Shreveport Police Department 

Letters were also received from Dr. Kyser and Mayor Fant, congratulat- 
ing the students on their behavior at the State Fair Game. These let- 
ters were received too late to be printed this week, but will appear in 
the next issue of the "Current Sauce." 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1964 



Sigma Tau Gets 
58 New Pledges 

Sigma Tau accepted 58 new pled- 
ges and replaced 8 other men. Nu 
chapter's dynamic growth is indi- 
cated by the acceptance of the lar- 
gest pledge class on campus. The 
pledge class will hold election of 
officers October 27, 1964 and they 
will be announced the following 
week. The pledge class is under the 
supervision of Sigma Tau's pledge 
trainer, Jolly Gilliam. 

The annual Irma Thomas dance 
sponsored by the Sigma Tau alum- 
nae was held after the NSC-Tech 
game October 24, 1964. 

Recently initiated members of 
Sigma Tau Gamma are Trigger Al- 
len, Joe Butler, John Cooper, Joe 
Gimbert, Adrian Grimmett, Jack 
Hollinshead, Rick Hudson, and 
Johnny Smith. Congratulations! 

The Taus have also entered two 
intramural football teams — Sigma 
Tau and "B" Frame. The coaches 
of these teams are Mike McDaniel 
and Jim McMahon. 

Tommy Allen and Mike West- 
moreland were appointed to the 
office of social chairman. They will 
head the many social functions for 
the remaining school year. 



TKE's To Picnic 

Tau Kappa Epsilon social fra- 
ternity is planning to go to Red 
Dirt on November 7. Much time 
has been spent planning this trip, 
so everyone should have an excel- 
lent time. 

Delta Zeta sorority is sponsor- 
ing a Greek dance to which the 
Tekes have been invited. We be- 
lieve that this is a wonderful idea 
which will encourage a better re- 
lationship between fraternities and 
sororities, and the Tekes salute 
Delta Zeta for this great move to- 
ward Greek unity. 

We have met with Alpha Sigma 
Alpha sorority to make final plans 
for the homecoming float which 
we will present on November 14. 
Homecoming weekend should be a 
wonderful opportunity for the 
Tekes to "show their stuff," and 
that is exactly what we are plan- 
ning to do. Not only will we pre- 
sent a float in the parade, but we 
are planning to show everyone 
what "real" school spirit is. No one 
has had much spirit lately, and 
TKE feels this should be corrected. 
The chapter members will be do- 
ing their best to liven things up at 
the homecoming game, and we 
urge all groups, as well as indivi- 
duals, to do their part in reviving 
our lost school spirit. 

After suffering from a slow start, 
TKE has shown considerable pro- 
gress, and all of you can look for- 
ward to hearing and seeing a lot 
of the "new" Tekes. 



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Delta Zeta Sponsors All Greek Dance 



Epsilon Beta Chapter of Delta 
Zeta will sponsor a Greek Dance 
tonight. The dance will be held in 
the Student Center beginning at 
7:30 p.m. Admission will be a soro- 
rity or fraternity pin worn on eit- 
her member of a couple attending. 
All Greeks and their dates are in- 
vited to attend this dance. 

On October 24, Delta Zetas over 
the nation celebrated the 62nd ann- 
iversary of the sorority. Delta Zeta 
was incorporated at Miami Univer- 
sity in Oxford, Ohio, by six found- 
ers. Epsilon Beta Chapter of Delta 
Zeta celebrated Founder's Day 
October 22. A program was pre- 
sented by a few of the sorority 
members for the pledges and the 
other members. 

Helen Neal Radke, noted edu- 
cator and president of the Natio- 
nal School Board Association for 
the year 1963-64, has been named 
Delta Zeta Sorority's Woman of 
the Year for 1964 by a committee 
of national judges. Mrs. Radke be- 
came a member of Delta Zeta Soro- 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
SERVICES 
Old Lemee House 
Jefferson St. 
Every Sunday 1 1 :00 A.M. 
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rity at the University of Washing- 
ton, Seattle, Washington. 

Tangible evidence of this award, 
a specially designed medallion, is 
presented at a Founder's Day cele- 
bration as announcement of the 
winner is made simultaneously 
throughout the nation to Delta 
Zeta's 153 college chapters and 232 
alumnae chapters. 

Mrs. Radke has been an NSBA 
director since 1957, serving as se- 
cond vice-president in 1961-62 and 
as first vice-president in 1962-63 
before being elected to the presi- 
dency for the year 1963-64. She is 
the second woman to be elected to 
this office in the 24 year history 
of the board. 



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ASA, TKE Design Homecoming Float 



Members of Alpha Sigma and 
TKE met last Wednesday to begin 
plans for a homecoming float. 
Plans were drawn and work will 
soon start on the float. 

Homecoming weekend is also Al- 
pha Sigma Alpha's Founders Day. 
A birthday party is planned with 
each member bringing a gift for 
the house. All alumni and members 



of the Alpha Sig chapter in Lafay- 
ette are invited to come to the par- 
ty. 

A Halloween party is scheduled 
for tonight with the traditional 
bobbing for apples and ghost stor- 
ies. Hot chocolate and toasting 
marshmellows in the fireplace will 
be in order for the night. 




STUDENTS 

Let us pamper your 
parents when they come 
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For Room reservations 
dial 6401 

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Demons Fall Again To Bulldogs 16-7 
Tech's Rushing Too Much For Demons 



Page 3 



A capacity crowd of 27,000 scr- 
eaming fans in State Fair Stadium 
witnessed one of the most hard- 
fought contests of the season Sat- 
urday night as Northwestern State 
College was handed a 16-7 defeat 
by Louisiana Tech in the annual 
State Fair classic. 

The victory marked nationally 
ranked Tech's sixth straight win 
of the season and their third GSC 
win while the Demons dropped 
their second decision in six games 
and now stand 1-1 in conference 
play. 

Fullback Gerald McDowell was 
the big threat for the Bulldogs al- 
though he failed to score. McDow- 
ell gained 118 yards on 17 carries 
and for his tremendous effort was 
named the outstaading back in the 
game. 

Sophomore end Dick Reding was 
voted the game's outstanding line- 
man as he scored NSC's only touch- 
down on a 10 yard pass from quar- 
terback Don Beasley. In addition 
to his brilliant defensive play, Red- 
ing hauled in four passes for a to- 
tal of 57 yards. 

Tech was first to score in the 
ballgame as Alden Reeves tallied 
from the eight yard line. End 
Corky Corken registered the other 
six-pointer in the third quarter on 
a 10-yard pass from quarterback 
Billy Laird. Bulldog end C. T. 
(Speedy) Campbell chipped in 
with a 22-yard field goal and a PAT 
after Tech's first touchdown. 

The Demons failed to cash in on 
two scoring attempts early in the 
second quarter that proved to be 
a main factor in the loss. On the 
first attempt the Demons had driv- 
en down to the Tech 7-yard line 
picking up two first downs early 
in the drive on a 16 yard jaunt by 
James Aymond and an 18 yard 
pass play from Beasley to Reding. 
The drive came to a halt, however, 
at the seven yard line where Beas- 
ley's pass to Dick Reding was in- 
complete, and the ball went over. 
The Demons missed another opp- 



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ortunity to score ten plays later as 
Beasley again passed incomplete 
on the 19 yard line. 

NSC came storming back to tie 
the score at the start of the second 
half as eding jarred the ball loose 
from Reeves on the kickoff, and 
Horton recovered for Northwest- 
ern. Beasley threw a 10 yard pass 
to Reding two plays later for the 
tally. Jimmy Scott added the PAT, 
and the score was knotted at 7-7. 

The Bulldogs didn't waste any 
time in moving the ball after Way- 
ne Walker kicked off for NSC. Mc- 
Dowell and Reeves combined to 
bring the pigskin down to the NSC 
10 where Laird connected with 
Corkern for the touchdown pass. 
Tech fumbled on the extra point 
attempt, and the score was 13-7 
with 9:28 remaining in the third 
quarter. 

Neither team managed to move 
the ball until mid-way in the four- 
th period when Tech had to settle 
for a field goal and ended their 
scoring for the night. The Tech 
margin was increased nine points 
to 16-7 as Campbell split the up- 
rights from the 22 yard line. 





BY U£*XV SAUL 



Aldredge, Reding 
Win Stagg Awards 

Last weeks action against La. 
Tech saw two players tied for top 
honors for their outstanding play. 
They were ends Dick Reding of 
Bossier City and Corwyn Aldredge 
of St. Francisville. Both will re- 
ceive the Alonzo Stagg Award. 
Reding was also named as the 
games outstanding lineman. 

The game produced ten mem- 
bers on the honor roll with James 
Aymond and Ed Horton being list- 
ed on both offense and defense. 
Other members on defense were 
Aldredge, Phillip Creel, Bob Fos- 
ter, Al Dodd, and Gary Schouest. 
Those making it on offense were 
Don Beasley, Claude Patrick, and 
Hubert Adams. 



Another year, another Tech 
game. Once again the Demons fall 
further behind in the series. It 
cannot be said though, that the 
Demons did not put up a fight. 
There can be given plenty of pra- 
ise to them as well as criticism. 
The first bit of praise can be given 
to the line. Throughout the whole 
game they were making holes in 
the Tech line giving our backfield 
plenty of romping room. In the 
same breath though, you must give 
credit to the backfield for taking 
advantage of these opportunities. 
They picked up a total of 148 
yards against a team that was giv- 
ing up only fifty yards a ball 
game. It seems that if the Demons 
had kept the ball on the ground, 
the outcome of the game might 
have been a little different. Credit 
also must be given to the defen- 
sive unit also. They did a spectacu- 
lar job by holding Tech's fabulous 
passer to 42 yards, allowing him 
only four completions in 12 at- 
tempts and intercepting two of 
them. Any defensive can be proud 
of this. 

After last week's action in the 
line of football predictions, this 
writer still manages to remain in 
the magic .800 circle, as a 12-3 
record helped to strengthen the 
old average. Two of the loses pin- 



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end against me were ties by LSU 
and Mississippi. These do nothing 
but hurt the old average. The oth- 
er mark was the NSC game, and 
we just won't say anything about 
that one. The overall record now 
stands at 37 right and seven wrong 
with two ties for an average of 
.804. So once again, here's hoping: 
La. Tech (9) over Tennessee Tech- 
Bulldogs still fighting for that 
number one spot. The home field 
gives them the advantage this 
week. 

McNeese (21) over La. College- 
Cowboys tree Wildcats in prepara- 



tion for their next week battle 
with NSC. 

Northeast (14) over Tampa — 
Homecoming for the Indians 
should be enough to give nod to 
NLSC. 

LSU (14) over Mississippi-- Tigers 
make up for last years flop on 
television. 

Alabama (20) over Mississippi 
State— Tide picks up more ground 
on national leaders as they move 
toward an undefeated record. 
Arkansas (9) over Texas A&M— 
Razorbacks go hog wild as they 
knock off another Texas team. 
Texas (20) over SMUf— Steers 
corrale the mustangs in this battle. 
Tulane (14) over VMI— Greenies 
have something to shout about as 
they score their second victory in 
two years. 

Rice (7) over Texas Tech— Should 
be an easy one for the Owls. 



ATTENTION ! 
Married Students 21 or Over 

Now you can get Automobile Liability Insurance for 
only $43.40 for six months. Plus, if you have received 
a credit in Drivers Education there is an additional 
10% discount. 

Call 6267 or drop in to see. . . 

Sutton Insurance Agency 

on St. Denis 



PENNYLAND 



1300 Washington 



Across From Peoples Motor Co. 



OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 
8 A.M. -12 P.M. 

Free Transportation To And From 
The College - 8 A.M. - 11 A.M. 



SIX POOL TABLES 
(Brunswick, Gold Crown) 

TWO SNOOKER TABLES 
(Brunswick, Gold Crown) 

Shuffle Board - Domino Tables 
Moon Tables - Bowling Tables 



Shooting Gallery 



SNACK BAR -AIR CONDITIONED 

ENTERTAINMENT FOR ALL 
MEN - LADIES - CHILDREN 



For Fun - Relaxation - Pleasure 
Visit PENNYLAND 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1964 



Maid Of Cotton 
Will Tour US 

The girl chosen in December as 
the cotton industry's fashion and 
good will ambassadress will visit 
32 cities on a cross-country tour of 
the United States. 

In addition she will make three 
trips into Canada and two trans- 
Atlantic jaunts. 

The Maid's official tour gets un- 
der way in January with appear- 
ances in the Netherlands and Can- 
ada. In February she will visit 
Florida, Montreal, and New Or- 
leans. During the months of March 
and April she will tour Texas, Cal- 
ifornia, Washington, Colorado, Ne- 
braska, Ohio, Iowa, and Canada. 
The May itinerary calls for stops 
in Rhode Island, Washington D.C., 
Tennessee, Maryland and North 
Carolina. 

In June, the Maid will board a 
jet for the second visit to the lead- 
ing fashion centers of Europe. Up- 
on her return she will be present- 
ed with a new automobile by the 
Memphis District Ford dealers. 

Applications for the 1965 Maid 
of Cotton selection will be accept- 
ed by the National Cotton Council, 
1918 North Parkway, Memphis, un- 
til midnight, November 30. 

The selection is open to girls bet- 
ween 19 and 25 who are at least 
five feet five and one-half inches 
tall, were born in a cotton-produc- 
ing state, and have never been mar- 
ried. 



Coast Guard Tests 
Open For Seniors 

College seniors or graduate stu- 
dents can fulfill their military ob- 
ligations as officers in the U.S. 
Coast Guard, the active peacetime 
service. Qualified applicants will 
be notified of selection for officer 
candidate school before they en- 
list. 

The classes convene in September 
and February at the Coast Guard 
Reserve Training Center in his- 
toric Yorktown, Virginia. The care- 
fully selected college graduates re- 
ceive 17 weeks of intensive, highly 
specialized training. Successful ap- 
plicants are tendered commissions 
as ensigns and serve on active du- 
ty for three years. 

Coast Guard officers are paid 
at the same rate as officers of 
other branches of the Armed 
Forces and receive the same ben- 
efits.These include 30 days of an- 
nual leave as well as free medical 
and dental care. They also have an 
opportunity to qualify for flight 
training. 

Peacetime duties of the Coast 
Guard include law enforcement, 
search and rescue, oceanographic 
research, ocean station patrols, and 
the maintenance om many types of 
aids to navigation. 

For further information on the 
U.S. Coast Guard Officer Candi- 
date School, write: Commandant 
(PTP-2), U.S. Coast Guard Head- 
quarters, 1300 "E" Street, N.W. 
Washington, D.C., 20226. 



IAC Membership 
Reaches New High 

Membership in the Industrial 
Arts Club has reached the largest 
in the history of its organization. 
At the regular meeting, Thursday 
night, it was announced that the 
club had a membership of 100. 

In the absence of the President, 
Horace Johnson, the Vice-presi- 
dent, Johnny Valentine, appointed 
committees for special work in 
which the club will be engaged in 
during the year. After a short busi- 
ness meeting the group made a 
tour of the Southern Cotton Oil 
Mill. 



Freshmen Grades Available 

Six-weeks' grades for all 1-1 
freshmen will be in the hands of 
faculty advisers by Saturday. 
Freshmen should see their advi- 
sers to discuss their academic pro- 
gress before Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 4. 



CANE THEATRE 

Natchitoches, La. Phone 2922 



Friday & Saturday 



-JACKIE 



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"HORROR CHAMBER 
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Sunday — Tuesday 




TECffiOGCIOri 

UURA-FAKAV1SI0N A PARAMOUNT RELEASE 



Wednesday — Thursday 




Baxter, Docolas To Be Initiated 



Hell week has started for Ted 
Baxter and Chris Dorolas, two Pi 
Kappa Phi pledges who are about 
to be initiated. Chris Dorolas has 
the distinction of being the first 
"Greek" Greek in the fraternity as 
he is originally from Athens, 



Greece. 

The fraternity football team has 
done well this year. The first game 
with the "D-Frame Mets" brought 
the Pi Kapps an 8-0 victory, and 
the second game was a 0-0 tie with 
Sigma Tau. 



SPECIAL TO COLLEGE STUDENTS 

1 . . . 5x7 . . . Portrait plus 8 wallet size . . . $4.75 
1 . . . 8x10 . . . Portrait plus 16 wallet size . . . $7.00 
WE DO NOT HAVE A SITTING CHARGE 



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NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 
Phones — 5556 — 5557 



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Wednesday 
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TRESSIES 
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Tressie Watts 
Elsie Hernandez 
Irma Courtney 
Jean Boucher 



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NEW DRUG STORE 
Second and St. Denis 
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Peter Hackes 



Defense Correspondent 
To Address Assembly 



1 



A top authority on American 
defense and space program efforts 
will be on the Northwestern State 
College campus Monday, Nov. 9 
under sponsorship of the Assem- 
bly Program Committee. 

Peter Hackes, a defense depart- 
ment correspondent for NBC news 
will appear at the first assembly 
of Northwestern Monday at 10 
a.m. Mr. Hackes knows his way 
around the sprawling Pentagon 
beter than most admirals, generals 
or senators. 

Five different Secretaries of 
Defense have struggled with the 
Nation's defense problems since 
Hackes began covering the De 
fense Oepartmtnt for NBC news 
ten years ago. 

On the political front, Hackes 
was NBC radio anchor man for 
both the 1964 Democratic and Re 
publican nominating conventions. 
Previously he covered parts of the 
Nixon-Kef auver vjce-presidential 
campaigh in 1956, traveing a to- 
tal of 40,000 miles. In 1960 he 
toured in the successful campaign 
of the late President Kennedy. 

Hackes also covered the Cuban 
missile crisis from the Defense De- 
partment, broadcasting for 21 con- 
secutive hours from a vantage 
point at the Pentagon. Later he 
helped produce the winning "NBC 
Whie Paper — 'Cuba, The Missile 
Crisis."' 

Hackes clear analysis of the 
news from Washington, his pen- 
etrating views on the men and 
events behind the news, and his 
perception on world news as it is 
viewed from the nation's capitol 
have won him the repsect of his 
fellow newsmen. 

Wherever there's news in Wash- 
ington, there's Hackes: the White 
House, Supreme Court, the hear- 
ing rooms on Capitol Hill, are all 
covered by the NBC news veteran. 
His regular beat includes the 
Office of the Secretary of Defense; 
high Army, Navy, Air Force and 
Marine Corps officials; the Nation- 
al Aeronautics and Space Admin- 
istration; the Atomic Energy Com- 
mission; and the Federal Aviation 
Agency. 

An acknowledged authority on 
America's space efforts, Hackes 
has covered all United States man- 
ned flights from Cape Kennedy. 
His active interest in space, com- 
bined with his inside knowledge 
of NASA, FAA, and AEC, have 



enabled him to become one of 
America's best-informed commen- 
tators on space. He is a governor 
of the National Space Club and 
holds active membership in the 
American Institute of Aeronau- 
tics and Astronautics, and the 
Aviation-Space Writers Associa 
tion. 

First and foremost, the New 
York City-born Hackes is a pro 
fessional journalist. Educated at 
Grinned College, Iowa, he holds a 
Master's degree in journalism 
from the University of Iowa. 

A World War n naval officer 
for three years, Hackes began his 
broadcasting journalism career as 
a reporter for radio stations in 
Kentucky, Ohio, Iowa, and New 
York. He joined NBC news in 
Washington after three years with 
the Washington bureau of ano- 
ther major network. 

Hackes news reports are broad- 
cast on "Monitor," "News on the 
Hour," "Emphasis," and "News of 
the World." Television viewers 
have seen his reports from Wash- 
ington on various NBC news tele- 
casts, including the "Today" show. 
Hackes has also appeared on 
"Meet the Press," and "Ask Wash- 
ington." 



VOL. LI— No. 9 Northwestern State College, Natchitoches La. Friday, Nov. 6, 1964 

Accreditation Team To Visit NSC; 
Will Assess Educational Program 



Potpourri Slates 
Retake Pictures 

Retakes for the 1965 Potpour- 
ri will be made on November 13 
between hours of 2:00 p.m. and 
6:30 p.m. at Uhrbach's Studio 
in the Broadmoor Shopping 
Center. 

Senior men are to wear white 
shirts and long dark ties; all 
other men students are to wear 
white shirts, long dark ties, and 
dark coats. 

We urge every student who 
has not had his picture taken 
for this year's Potpourri to re- 
port to Uhrbach's Studio and 
have his picture made. This in- 
cludes seniors, juniors, sopho- 
mores, and freshmen. Any fac- 
ulty member may also have his 
picture made at this time 



A visiting team of educators re- 
presenting the Southern Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Schools will 
be on the campus from Sunday 
evening until Wednesday. The es- 
sential purpose of the visit is to 
help the College improve its edu- 
cational effectiveness, and it also 
serves as a part of the accreditation 
process of the Southern Associa- 
tion. 

The visiting team will be under 
the chairmanship of Dr. Claude E. 
Fike, dean of the College of Arts 
and Sciences, University of South- 
ern Mississippi, and will include 
the following members: President 
R. W. Steen, Stephen F. Austin 
State College; Dr. Frederick W. 
Conner, dean of the College of Arts 
and Sciences, University of Ala- 
bama; Academic Dean John Mor- 
ris, Memphis State University. 

Dean Robert Moore, dean of stu- 
dents, Arkansas State College; Mr. 
Alfred Rawlinson, director of li- 
braries, University of South Caro- 



Northwestern Symphony Orchestra 
To Present Young People's Concert 



Placement Office 
Sets Interviews 

Next week brings representa- 
tives of two major corporations to 
our campus in search of qualified 
personnel to be given employment. 

Mr. Rudy J. Vondracek, person- 
nel dorector for the Murphy Oil 
Corporation, will conduct inter- 
views with January and June gra- 
duates in the upper half of their 
ciasses on November 11. The com- 
pany wishes to interview Account- 
ing and Business Administration 
majors for these positions. 

Montgomery Ward will, Thurs- 
day, November 12, interview stu- 
dents with Accounting or Business 
Administration backgrounds for 
prospective employment. 

Appointments for these inter- 
views and newsof others can be 
obtained from Mr. Joe W. Webb, 
director of placement, in the 
Placement Office, Room 19, Cald- 
well Hall. 



The Northwestern Symphony 
Orchestra, under the direction of 
Dr. Joseph Carlucci, will present 
its annual fall Young People's Con- 
certs on Tuesday. The first will be 
presented at 9:00 a.m. in the East 
Natchitoches Junior High School 
auditorium. Attending will be stu- 
dents and faculty from the East 
Natchitoches Elementary and Jun- 
ior High Schools, with M. R. Wea- 
ver and H. L. Graham, the re- 
spective principals. The orchestra 
will then go to Parks Elementary 
School, C. A. Martin, principal, for 
a concert at 10:30 a.m. The third 
program is scheduled for the NSC 
Fine Arts Auditorium at 1 :30 p.m. 
Students and faculty attending this 
concert will come from Northwest- 
ern Elementary School, L. F. Fow- 
ler, principal; Northwestern Jun- 
ior High, W. J. Bullock, principal; 
Natchitoches High, Dan Carr, prin- 
cipal; St. Mary's Elementary and 
High Schools, Sister Macaria, prin- 
cipal. Invitations have also been 
extended to schools in Robeline, 
Campti and Ashland. 

These programs are designed to 
help young people learn how to 
listen to and appreciate music 
played by a symphony orchestra. 
The selections played are chosen 
for their beauty and appeal to 
young people. Works to be per- 
formed at next Tuesday's concerts 
include: Light Cavalry Overture 
by Von Suppe; Minuet from Sym- 
phony No. 5 by Schubert; Waltz 



from the "Sleeping Beauty" ballet 
by Tschaikowsky; Sleigh Ride by 
Leroy Anderson. The string sec- 
tion of the orcerstra will be fea- 
tured in Plink, Plank, Plunk by 
Anderson; a special arrangement 
of "When Johnny Comes Marching 
Home"; and a Song by Grieg. The 
audience will sing "A Prayer of 
Thanksgiving" in recognition of 
the approaching Thanksgiving hol- 
iday. 

There is no admission charge for 
any of these concerts. They are 
presented as part of the continu- 
ing program of service which the 
Northwestern Music Department 
extends to schools in the Natchi- 
toches area. Parents and the pub- 
lic are invited to attend the con- 
cert in the Fine Arts Auditorium. 
Those interested in attending con- 
certs at the other locations should 
contact the principals involved. 



lina; Dr. Charles M. Clarke, direct- 
or of teacher education, North 
Texas State University; Professor 
Nan Springstead, Emory Universi- 
ty School of Nursing; and Dr. 
Ralph Tesseneer, dean of graduate 
studies, Murray, Kentucky State 
College. 

During the past three years, the 
faculty has been engaged in a self 
study designed to help the College 
reassess its objectives, measure 
success in achieving its objectives, 
and to explore ways and means by 
which its educational efficiency 
may be improved. The findings of 
the study have been published in 
a 191-page report which has been 
submitted to the Southern Associa- 
tion. 

Prior to their arrival on the cam- 
pus, the members of the Visiting 
Team will have studied the report, 
and they will spend their time on 
the campus interviewing faculty 
members and students, meeting 
With the Student Council and some 
faculty committees, visiting the 
various buildings on the campus, 
and, in general, attempting to get 
a quick evaluation of the effective- 
ness of the College to the end that 
they will be able to make sugges- 
tions which might lead to the im- 
provement of the total College 
program. 

Students should not be surprised 
if they are questioned by one or 
more of the visitors, and they 
should feel free to offer any con- 
structive suggestions which they 
believe would be of value to the 
College. 

The student body, faculty, and 
administration of the College join 
in welcoming this group of educa- 
tors to the campus which is tradi- 
tionally one of the friendliest 
campuses to be found. 



Buy Tickets At McNeese 

Student tickets for the NSC- 
McNeese football game Saturday 
night will not be sold on Campus. 
Students may buy their tickets at 
the stadium in Lake Charles for $1 
upon presentation of their ID card 



Ewell's Paintings 
In Art Gallery 

Mr. Orville J. Hanchey, head of 
the Art Department, announced 
that in addition to the current 
exhibition of paintings by Justin 
Schorr, assistant professor of art 
at Teachers' College, Columbia 
University, the paintings of the 
late Joe Scott Ewell of Chenny- 
ville, La. are also being displayed 
in the art gallery of NSC in the 
Fine Arts Bulding. 

Ewell studied art at the Art 
Institute in Chicago, the New York 
Students League, and the John 
McCready Art School in New 
Orleans. 

His paintings have been exhibit- 
ed at Louisiana College, the Lou- 
isiana Art Commission, the Art 
Museum in Beaumont, Tex., and in 
various showings in New Orleans. 




Reigning as queen of the Northwestern Homecoming court 
this year is Carolyn Thomas, (center). She and her court, 
elected by the members of the "N" Club, will be present- 
ed to the Homecoming crowd in pregame ceremonies 
when the Demons meet Southwestern on November 14. 
Other members of the court include: (front row) Bonnie 
Gorum and Ramona Reynolds; (second row) Nora Jane 
Colvin and Mrs. Pamela Fulton; (third row) Georgia Blair, 
Patricia Cooper and Catherine Cook. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1964 




SIGMA TAU GAMMA pledgees are from left to right, ROWl:Koll, Charles Seaman, Tommy Watson, Bobby Varner, Ken 
Bill Hochstetler, Wayne Perryman, Butch Wiggins, BillFisher, Ronnie Whitmore, Sydney Green, Gary Foster, Jim 
Brock, Donnie Winn, Buddy Veuleman, Wayne Anderson, Bolster, Mike Herron, Joey Calloway, Elliott Higginbotham, 
Don Wolf, Derrel Strother, O.L. Evans and Doug Giles. ROW and Stanley Parham. ROW 4: Wynne Friedricks, Bob Pine, 
2: Bobby Bond, Jay Carter, Teddy Hargrove, Bill Burris,Jerry Summerlin, David Butler, Gilbert Stroud, Denny Hy- 
James Crawford, Danny Walker, Brian Brewton, Lionel ams, Kenneth Touchet, Bill Murphy, Jim Beam, Sam Taylor, 
Bourg, and Jeff Harris. ROW 3: Ed Cullen, Dale Magee, Jack- Clifton Doroddy, Joe German, Joel Walton, Rick Evans, John- 
ie Self, Fred Parker, George Robinson, Barry Guillet, Bobny Mulina, Jimmy Gleason, and Dennis Moulard. 



KA's Planning Christmas Party 
For Crippled, Retarded In City 



Plans are now being formulated 
by Kappa Alpha for a Christmas 
party to be given for the retarded 
and crippled children of Natchi- 
toches, and making arrangements 
through Mr. Noles. We appreciate 
the great amount of interest and 
help he has offered to us and hope 
we can make this affair a real 
success. 

The social committee is working 
out the final arrangements for the 
festivities coming up at Northwest- 
ern's Homecoming. On the social 
side, we wish to commend Miss 
Mary Ann Jones, president of 
Delta Zeta sorority, and the mem- 
bers, for the Greek dance they 



Future Plans For 
Pi Kappa Phi 

Pi Kappa Phi is proud to announ- 
ce the initiation of two new bro- 
thers, Chris Docolar and Teddy 
Baxter. They, along with the rest 
of the chapter, have many plans 
for the future which include: a 
booth at the Christmas festival, 
continuation of intramural activi- 
ties with bowling, and the Rose 
Ball which will be held one week 
after the Christmas festival. The 
Pi Kapps are proud to announce 
that this year Brother Mel Metcalf, 
national president, will be present 
for the Rose Ball. 



held in the Student Center last 
Friday. It was the first all-Greek 
function of the year and truly a 
success. 

The pledge class of this chapter 
had its first pledge test last Thurs- 
day night; these tests are a vital 
part of the pledge training pro- 
gram, as they give the pledge a 
deeper understanding of the org- 
anization and its functions. 

The K.A. football team defeated 
Pi Kappa Phi in a rugged well 
played contest. Our team may not 
boast the best record, but it has 
played some very close games and 
the chapter appreciates the fine 
coaching efforts of Brothers Tom 
Cathey and Lynn Hargrave and 
the team spirit. The season is not 
over yet and we hope to finish 
very strong. 

In closing, this chapter must 
inform the student body that this 
past Thursday night our fraternity 
house was broken into and vandal- 
ized; thankfully the articles stolen 
were of small monetary value and 
were later partially recovered. 
Some physical damage was done to 
the house itself and to the chapter 
because of the personal value of 
some of the stolen properties. We 
would appreciate any information 
which would lead to the identity 
of the vandals and sincerely hope 
such events will not befall any 
organization on this campus in 
the future. Thank you for your 
attention and interest in this 
matter. 



Kappa Delta Pi To Meet 

Kappa Delta Pi, national honor- 
ary scholastic educational fratern- 
ity, will meet at 6:30 p.m. in the 
Home Economics Living Room. 

All members are urged to attend 
this important meeting. 



ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED 

The engagement has been an- 
nounced of Madge Ingram, to Har- 
ry L. Kirk ni. Miss Ingram is an 
education major and Kirk is maj- 
oring in English. The wedding will 
be in January. 



Sigma Kappa Holds 
Halloween Party 

The Sigma Kappa actives held a 
Halloween Party for the pledges, 
October 29. The refreshments 
served were hot chocolate, apples, 
caramel popcorn balls, candy, po- 
tato chips and dips. 

The sorority has already done a 
lot of work on their homecoming 
float. The chairmen in charge of 
building the float are: Jackie Long 
and Ann Maclamore. If you pass by 
the Sigma Kappa house, you may 
hear hammering and you just may 
see nails and lumber flying. If 
you're lucky, you just may see a 
sneak preview of their float. 



SLTA Will Provide 
Bus To Shreveport 

The Student Louisiana Teachers 
Association will provide a bus to 
the LTA Convention in Shreveport 
November 24. All persons interest- 
ed in attending may sign up at the 
SLTA's regular meeting, Novem- 
ber 19, at 6:45 p.m. in Warren 
Easton Auditorium. 

i— li 



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f 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



Student Cooperation Needed 

Again this semester the lines have started forming in 
Caldwell Hall outside the Cashier's Office every month when 
room and board payments are due. Because of the rapid in- 
crease in enrollment, this problem, along with many more, 
is more acute than ever before. 

Last year the Accounting Office established a method 
whereby one could pay his dues in his respective dormitory. 
A box was placed in each dormitory and one could deposit 
his payment without going to Caldwell. This practice was con- 
tinued this year, but the results haven't been very favorable. 

There are 2680 students on campus who pay their room 
and board by the month and of this number only 152 persons 
paid in their dormitories for the first month. This procedure 
was established primarily for the benefit of the student, yet 
less than 6 percent of the students are taking advantage of 
this opportunity. 

In an effort to further alleviate some of the problems at 
the cashier windows, a new schedule has been set up. The win- 
dow hours for cashing checks and money orders has been 
extended to include the hours from 8:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. 
and will be closed one hour for lunch. The other window, for 
room and board payments, will be open from 10 a.m. until 
3 p.m. This should provide adequate time for those students 
who must pay in cash to do so without having to stand in line. 

Students are also reminded that they can pay their room 
and board payments any time during the month prior to the 
final date. 

If everyone would cooperate and use the dormitory boxes 
as much as possible, it would solve many of the student prob- 
lems and also assist the Accounting Office in their attempt 
to serve the students. This is a sincere effort to help you and 
it is only fair that you do your part. 



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Student Council 
Minutes 

The regular meeting of the Nor- 
thwestern Student Council was 
held at 6 p.m. in Bullard Hall. The 
meeting was called to order by 
President Steve Blount. The roll 
was called, and the minutes of the 
previous meeting were read and 
approved. 

Blount repoted that it had been 
suggested that the council pur- 
chase a peg board directory to be 
placed in the telephone booth at 
the student center. This board 
would have all dormitory telephone 
numbers on it. A discussion follow- 
ed. Jean. Walker moved that the 
council check into the matter. Se- 
cond by J. O. Charrier. Blount ap- 
pointed Charrier to check and find 
out how much such a board would 
cost. 

It was reported that new albums 
were needed for the student cen- 
ter. Jimmy Berry pointed out that 
the council should check and find 
out how many students use the al- 
bums, the number of new albums 
needed, and the cost. Blount ap- 
pointed Nick DeJean, Patsy Gas- 
pard, and Berry to check into this. 

J. O. Charrier will make a report 
to the council in the near future 
on what should be done to prepare 
for the election of Mr. and Miss 
NSC and Who's Who in American 
Colleges and Universities. 

Parliamentarian Roy Corley 
read Article 5 of the NSC Student 
Body Constitution. It states that 
any council member who accumu- 
lates three unexcused absences 
during one semester shall forfeit 
his seat on the council. The Presi- 
dent shall determine what is a va- 
lid excuse. 

Charrier reported that posters 
advertising "The Four Seasons" 
would be off the press tomorrow. 
Charrier asked for volunteers to 
put these posters up in nearby 
towns. Butch Wiggins and Martha 
Lou Carroll will put up posters in 
Provencal, Flora and Cloutierville. 
Joe Traigle, Stan Branton, and Jim 
Leabo - . Campti, Clarence, and 
Montgomery. Jimmy Berry - -Winn- 
field. J. O. Charrier, Milton Rhea, 
and R. J. Ardoin - - Many, Robe- 
line, and Marthaville. Pat Holley 
and Nick DeJean - - Coushatta. 
Traigle suggested that members 
of the council go to the larger 
towns and have a certain time and 
place to sell tickets. Rhea suggest- 
ed that cushions be sold at the per- 
formance of "The Four Seasons." 
Rhea moveed that the council ask 
the PEM Club if they would like to 
handle this. Second by Berry. Mo- 
tion passed. Charrier announced 
that the council members would 
sell tickets at the performance the 
day of the performance from 4 to 
8:30 p.m. 

Berry moved that a coffee be 
given by the council for "The Four 
Seasons" before their performance. 
Second by Calbert Marcantel. Mo- 
tion passed. Blount appointed Jean 
Walker chairman of a committee 
to see that this is done. The com- 
mittee is composed of Marcantel, 
Gaspard, and Thomas. 

Milton Rhea reported that the 
neon "N" on the water tower was 
out of order and would not be re- 
paired since the water tower will 
be torn down. It was reported that 
the maintenance department 
would be willing to build a 4 sided 
neon "N" to be placed on top of 
the Fine Arts Auditorium. Rhea 
moved that the maintenance de- 
partment be asked to construct 
such an "N". Seconded by Barbara 
Wallace. Motion passed. 

Nick DeJean raised the question 
as to wheree it was the duty of the 
class president to fill any vacan- 
cies in class offices. Blount report- 
ed that it was. 

Butch Wiggins raised the quees- 
tion as to where the Homecoming 
Dance would be held. Blount re- 
ported that a definite location had 
not been decided upon. The dance 
will be free and will feature Bob- 
by Charles. It was reported that 
between $10 and S15 would be al- 
lowed for decorations. 

Dean Fulton reported that he 
has a trophy in his office which be- 
longs to the council. DeJean sug- 
gested that if a trophy was to be 



Letters To The Editor 



Dear Editor, 

Last Saturday evening I was ap- 
palled at the behavior of NSC stu- 
dents. Our general behavior in 
Shreveport was considered much 
improved by the authorities, but 
we let our team down. 

The Demons played hard and 
long. At the half, NSC students be- 
gan a mass exodus. By the time the 
final buzzer sounded, half our 
crowd was gone. Our cheerleaders 
yelled away their voices, where was 
the response? Our team played an 
admirable game, where were their 
supporters? We lost, but where 
was our spirit? Gone to the fair, a 
dance, or to Bossier! NSC needs a 
planned revival of school spirit. 
Christene Strother 
P.O. Box 1094, NSC 



Student Council 
Minutes 

The regular meeting of the 
Northwestern Student Council was 
held at 6 p.m. in Bullard Hall. 
President Steve Blount called the 
meeting to order. The roll was 
called, and the minutes of the pre- 
vious meeting were read and ap- 
proved. 

It was announced that the elec- 
tion of Mr. and Miss NSC would 
be held November 24. If a run-off 
is necessary, it will be held Dec- 
ember 1. After a discussion, the 
council decided to use the names 
of students who had been nomi- 
nated for Mr. and Miss NSC by the 
various dorms as a basis for select- 
ing Who's Who In American Col- 
leges and Universities. The Pres- 
ident of the Student Council and 
the President of the junior class 
will select a committte of students 
who will work with faculty mem- 
bers in making the final selection. 

Jean Walker reported that the 
student council coffee which will 
be given prior to the performance 
of "The Four Seasons" will be 
held in the conference room at the 
coliseum. A definite time for the 
coffee has not been set. 

J. O. Charrier reported that he 
needed volunteers to put up signs 
in Natchitoches advertising the 
performance of "The Four Sea- 
sons." The following people will 
put up signs: Carolyn Thomas — 
Front St.; Roy Corley, Jim Leabo, 
Betty Moore, Wayne Meachum — 
Broadmoor Shopping Center; Pat- 
sy Gaspard and Jean Walker — 
Natchitoches High and Northwest- 
ern Junior High; Alix Harris and 
Bonnie Methvin — East Natchitoch- 
es Junior High; Joe Traigle, Stan 
Branton, and Butch Wiggins — mis- 
cellaneous locations. Tickets will 
be on sale in Pat's and Lewis' on 
Front Street. Students will be ad- 
mitted on their I.D. card. 

Milton Rhea was asked to notify 
the maintenance department to go 
ahead with the construction of the 
neon "N." 

Charrier reported that the coun- 
cil would not be able to purchase 
a peg board for the student center 
due to the high cost. Dean Fulon 
reported that he had a frame that 
could be used. A poster with all 
dormitory numbers on it will be 
fixed to go in this frame. 

Blount reported that the Vets 
Town road needed repair and that 
Vets' Town also needed garbage 
can racks. Dean Fulton said that 
he would check into the matter. 

Joe Traigle asked if it was pos- 
sible for our telephone system to 
be changed so that each room had 
a private phone. Dean Fulton re- 
ported that this might be arranged 
if that is what the students want. 
One problem of this system would 
be that if a student had a room- 
mate who wanted a private phone 
then he would have to help pay for 
the phone even though he did not 
want it. Traigle suggested that the 

given to the organization doing 
most to boast school spirit that the 
trophy be passed on each year un- 
less an organization won it three 
consecutive years. The organiza- 
tion would be allowed to keep thee 
trcphy. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Carolyn Thomas 

Secretary 



Dear Sir: 

Recently I tried to find out how 
many cuts I had in my classes. The 
Attendance Officer told me in a 
smart-aleck manner to go see my 
instructors if I wanted that infor- 
mation. Isn't it my privilege to get 
this information at the Attendance 
Office without having to chase 
down all of my instructors? The 
Attendance Officer has plenty of 
time to supply this information, as 
it appears that she gives few, if 
any, excuses. 

It is my understanding that the 
Attendance Officer has questioned 
letters from specialists, doctors, 
and parents. Does this Attendance 
Officer have a medical degree to 
qualify herself in these matters? I 
hardly think so. 

Why can't students and veterans 
over 21 years of age sign their own 
excuses without their honesty and 
integrity being questioned by fas- 
tidious, snide, snotty questions? 
This would help to clear up the 
most infuriating situation that I 
have ever seen in my life. 

There is a right and wrong way 
of answering questions and re- 
quests. The Attendance Officer has 
amply demonstrated that she knows 
the wrong way. SHE WOULD DO 
WELL TO LEARN THE RIGHT 
WAY! 

Sincerely yours, 
James E. Harris 
Accounting 2-2 



telephone company be contacted 
and asked how much they would 
charge per semester for a private 
line. It was reported that the new 
dorms which are to be constructed 
will have facilities for private lines 
in each room. 

Calbert Marcantel announced 
that the Rhythm Dukes would 
play for the dance Wednesday. 
Council members who will work 
this week are Bonnie Methvin, Pat 
Holley, and Jim Leabo. 

Dean Fulton reported that a 
religious emphasis week was being 
planned for next spring. At the 
present time, outstanding religious 
speakers are being invited to come 
for this special week. The council 
was urged to give this program its 
full support. Betty Moore, Scotty 
Maxwell, and Barbara Wallace 
were selected to work on the com- 
mittee planning this event. 

Members of an evaluation team 
from the Southern Association of 
Schools and Colleges will be at the 
council meeting next Monday in 
conjunction with their evaluation 
of the college. 

Roy Corley raised the question 
as to whether seniors could dis- 
continue their meal tickets if they 
had already purchased one. It was 
reported that seniors could make 
one change during a semester. If 
they did not want their meal ticket, 
they could drop it at the beginning 
of the pay period. However, if they 
changed their mind and wanted 
one again, they would not be able 
to purchase it during that semes- 
ter. It was reported that the coun- 
cil has asked that juniors be able 
to participate in this option system 
next spring. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Carolyn Thomas 
Secretary 



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? ha r on HUhnan Associate Editor 

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Koy G. Clark Faculty Adviser 

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Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
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The ,, Cur . rent Sauce prints 'he news im- 
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Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1964 




Members of the Northwestern basketball team for this year are ((left to right); Emmet 
Hendricks, Lester Lee, Tommy Stewart, Kenneth Arthur, Jerry McLaurin, Billy Ray, 
Sam Watts, David Clark, Alfred LeGrand, Dennis Lewis, Larry Rivers, Kenneth Simmons 
and Danny Walker. 




INTRAMURALS 

After four weeks of intramural 
play, the Dees and Brickshack are 
currently the respective leaders in 
| their leagues in the football race. 

In all games through Monday, 
November 2nd, Brickshack and the 
Knightkats occupy the top two 
positions in League 1. Both teams 
have yet to lose a contest as Brick- 
shack has won its first five games 
without a defeat, and the Knight- 
kats are undefeated in four games. 
The Packers are running a close 
third with four wins, a tie, and only 
one loss. Sigma Tau holds the four- 
th spot in the standings while Kap- 
pa Alpha and Pi Kappa are in fifth 
and sixth place respectively. 

In League 2, the Dees have 
swept to four straight victories 
without a defeat to hold an undis- 
puted first place position. The 
Coonies, last year's intramural 
champs, are currently tied for the 
number two spot in the league 
with the Piney Woods Rooters, 
each sporting a three wins and one 
loss record. The Hustlers and the 
Linebusters are battling it out for 
a fourth position as each have two 
wins and as many losses. The last 
three places in order of wins are 
occupied by B-Frame, A-Frame and 
the Semi-Holes. 

Here are the standings in both 
leagues as of Monday, November 
2nd: 

League 1 



Officers of the Northwestern State College Neptune Club 
are (top row, left to right) Mike Bac, president; Jeff Swil- 
ley, vice-president; (bottom row, left to right) Betty Mor- 
gan, secretary-treasurer; and Sue Riggs, publicity chair- 



man. 

Neptune Club Will Present Water Show 

Members of the Neptune Club 
at Northwestern will present a 
water show entitled "King Nep 



tune Presents" next Thursday and 
Friday evenings, Nov. 12 and 13, 
at the Natatorium. 

The show will include synchro- 
nized swimming, clown acts includ- 
ing comedy diving, exhibition div- 
ing, dancing, and added special 
events. 

Reigning over the program will 
be King Neptune, Jerry Hart and 
Queen Mary Celeste Brooks. 

Additional features of the pro- 
gram will include a balancing ex- 



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hibition by gymnastics Coach Fred 
Martinez and four-year-old son, 
Robert and a weight-lifting demon- 
stration by Ben Davis and Mike 
Lowe. 

Miss Joyce Hillard, assistant pro- 
fessor of health and physical edu- 
cation, is in charge of the pro- 
gram. 





W 


L 


T 


Brickshack 


5 








Knightkats 


4 








Packers 


4 


1 


1 


Sigma Tau 


2 


1 


1 


Kappa Alpha 


3 


3 





Pi Kappa 


2 


3 


1 


League 


2 








W 


L 


T 


Dees 


4 








Piney Woods 


3 


1 





Coonies 


3 


1 





Hustlers 


2 


2 





Linebusters 


2 


2 





B-Frame 


1 


3 





A-Frame 


1 


4 





Semi-Holes 





4 






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ITS NOW OR NEVER. This will be 
the fight song for both teams Sat- 
urday night as the NSC Demons 
travel to Lake Charles to clash 
with the McNeese Cowboys. One 
thing for sure, it will be a rough 
and tough battle as a loss would 
eliminate any hope for a GSC title 
for either team. All there is to do 
now is to sit back and wait for La. 
Tech to drop one of their remain- 
ing GSC tilts, something they are 
not likely to do. 

Reports from Houston show 
that Sammy Joe Odom, NSC's Lit- 
tle All American of the 1963 sea- 
son, is now the starting linebacker 
for the Houston Oilers in the 
American Football League. Among 
his many fetes accomplished this 
year was a fumble recovery which 
set up Houston with a go ahead 
touchdown against Buffalo last 
Sunday. 

NSC's powerful offense this 
year is good enough to rank the 
Demons as the number nine team 
in the nation in total offense. In 
five games, the Demons have pick- 
ed up 1943 yards in 322 plays and 
are averaging 388.6 yards per ball 
game. 

In looking over the records of 
past years, it is noted that the high- 
est score ever compiled by a De- 
mon team was 134 points in 1915. 
The game was played against Mon- 
roe High. The most points ever 
given up by a NSC eleven was 78 
in 1921 against LSU. 

Last weeks predictions turned 
out to be just an average week as 
I was able to hit on seven out of 
nine. One of the misses was a tie 
between Rice and Texas Tech. This 
brings the total number right to 
44, while missing eight and three 
ties. This keeps the average in the 
magic .800 circle as it is .800 even. 

This week looks as if it is going 
to be one of those in and out weeks 
for predictors with the same old 
story of some tough ones and some 
easy ones for the pickings. 
McNeese (7) over NSC - - - one of 
those hang-the-predictor-in-effigy 
predictions. Demons have injuries 
while Cowboys are returning to full 
strength. 

La. Tech (13) over Southeastern - 
Bulldogs tree the lions as they 



move on to an undisputed first 
place finish in the GSC. 
Southwestern (20) over North- 
east — Indians return to their tee- 
pee scalpless as Russ Faulkinber- 
ry's crew prevails. 
Alabama 10) over LSU - - . Mighty 
Tigers should look like kitty cats 
against a powerful tide. 

Arkansas (13) over Rice When 

the Owls say "Who", the Razor- 
backs are liable to answer abrubt- 
ly on the score board. 
Ole Miss (35) over Tampa - - - 
Stirred up Rebels find little resis- 
tance as they play another one of 
their easy opponents. 
Auburn (6) over Mississippi 
State - - - Half a Sidle is better than 
no Sidle. Home field advantage to 
Auburn. 

Tulane (7) over Miami - - - Green 
wave is stirred up by Hurricanes 
as storm warnings are given out 
to Florida teams. 

Texas (14) over Baylor - - - Steers 
should make a gory mess out of 
the Bears after struggling through 
their last two victories. 
Georgia Tech (6) over Tennes- 
see They'll have to call out 

more Volunteers after the Engi- 
neers stop running in Athens. 
Some quickies: 
Notre Dame (20) over Pitt 
Ohio State (10) over Penn State 
Kentucky (7) over Vandy 
Texas Tech (21) over West Texas 
Florida (14) over Georgia 



SLTA To Present 
Panel Discussion 

A panel discussion on "Growth of 
the Teacher" will be presented at 
the next meeting of the Student 
Louisiana Teachers Association. 
Members of the panel are Charlot- 
te Shephard, Jean Walker, Pat Rog- 
ers, and Douglas Westbrook. The 
meeting will be held November 19 
at 6:45 p.m. in Warren Easton Au- 
ditorium. 

Diane Johnson and Diane Sp- 
rawls will represent NSC at the 
State Executive Committee meet- 
ing of SLTA in Shreveport, on 
November 23 and 24. Diane Sp- 
rawls is the state SLTA treasurer. 



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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 5 




Dick Reding 

Receiving the Alonzo St- 
agg award for their out- 
standing play aganst Lou- 
isiana Tech two weeks ago 
were Corwyn Aldredge 
and Dick Reding. 



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Northwestern And McNeese To Meet 
Decisive Battle Decided Saturday 



The Northwestern Demons will 
travel to Lake Charles Saturday 
night to do battle with the always 
tough McNeese Cowboys. The game 
will be a must for both teams as 
they have each suffered a loss in 
their conference records. Another 
loss would all but eliminate them 
from a shot at the GSC title. The 
Demons have had a full two weeks 
to prepare for this encounter as 
they enjoyed their first off week 
of the season. The Cowboys, on the 
other hand, celebrated a home- 
coming victory by downing the 
Wildcats of La. College. 

The series between the two clubs 
is a relatively new one with the 
first game being played in 1951. 
Since then the Cowboys have main- 
tained an edge by winning eight 
and losing five. They currently are 
boasting a four game winning 
streak as they have not dropped 
one to the Demons since 1959. 

In last year's action, the De- 
mons threw a scare into the Pokes 
as they led the GSC champs for 
three quarters. In the fourth quar- 
ter, a couple of key plays went 
against the Demons and McNeese 
was able to score a couple of 
touchdowns and end up on the 



GSC Track Meet At 
SLC Saturday 

Northwestern State College will 
travel to Hammond Saturday after- 
noon to do battle with Southeast- 
ern Louisiana College in a GSC 
cross-country track meet. Both 
teams have failed as yet to win a 
meet and this one should be close. 

The Demons finished third be- 
hind Northeast and Tech in their 
first meet and have been edged by 
Northeast and La. Tech in other 
meets. 

Bright spots for the Demons will 
be newcomer Edward Watt of Eng- 
land. Watt finished first in his 
opening start at Tech and is ex- 
pected to be a top competitor for 
honors in the annual Gulf States 
Conference meet at Ruston later 
on this year. 



winning side of a 21-13 score. 

The Demons have shown that 
they possess a fine offense as they 
are ranked ninth in the nation by- 
averaging 388.6 yards a ball game. 
Two backs who are partly respon- 
sible for this are James Aymond 
and Claude Patrick. Aymond is 
the team's leading ball carrier as 
he has carried the ball 25 times 
for a total of 266 yards and a fine 
average of 10.4 yards per carry. 
Patrick has proven to be the work 
horse of the team as he has carried 
the ball a total of 56 times and 
picked up 276 yards for an aver- 
age of 4.9 yards. The Demons still 
have eight backs who are averag- 
ing four yards or better per carry. 

The game will be played at 
McNeese's New Stadium in Lake 
Charles at 8 p.m. 



Girl's Volleyball 
Team To Compete 
In Mid-South Meet 

This weekend the Girls' Varsity 
Volleyball team, sponsored by the 
Women's Physical Education De- 
partment, will travel to Memphis 
State University to participate in 
the Mid-South Intercollegiate Vol- 
leyball Tournament. Northwestern 
will compete against eighteen 
teams of colleges and universities 
from four states. 

In its first year of competition 
in this tournament, Northwestern 
has entered both "A" and "B" 
teams. The "A" team is composed 
of Jinks Coleman, captain; Rose 
Masaraca, Roberta Wescott, San- 
dra Foster, Cecil McPherson, Lin 
da Harper, and Shirley Hillman 
Playing on Northwestern's "B' 
team will be Betty Faught, cap 
tain; Babs Morgan, Fay Belgard 
Sharlett Burgess, Dianne Laurence 
Johnnie Keglon, and Liz Heitman 

In the first round Friday night, 
the "A" team will meet the Univer- 
sity of Tennessee at Martin, and 
the "B" team will play Belhaven 
College of Jackson, Mississippi. 



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Four ROTC cadets received Distinguished Military Stu- 
dent awards at special ceremonies at Northwestern last 
week. Students receiving awards were, left to right, Cadet 
Lt. Col. Milbon J. Gaspard, Cadet Major Thomas Putnam, 
Cadet Capt. Robert R. Port, and Cadet Capt. William Addi- 
son. The presentations were made by Brig. Gen. W. F. 
Winton Jr., deputy commander of Fort Polk before the en- 
tire ROTC corps. 



Bienvenu Announces Research Project 



Dr. Rene J. Bienview, Head of 
the Department of Microbiology at 
Northwestern, has announced the 
initiation of a cooperative research 
project with Gerber Products Com- 
pany, of Fremont, Michigan, the 
world's largest manufacturer of 
prepared baby foods. 

The project will be under the 
direction of Dr. Paul J. Thompson, 
assistant professor of microbiology, 
who will be assisted by graduate 



student Mrs. Carol Gipson Moore 
of Jonesboro. Research will deal 
primarily with the bio-chemistry 
and physiology of spore-forming 
bacteria. 



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Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAJCE 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1964 



January Candidates For 
Degrees Announced 



Candidates for degrees at the 
fall commencement exercises total 
208, according to an announcement 
by Registrar Otis R. Crew. 

Leading in number, Bachelor of 
Science degree candidates total 
101; 69 are scheduled to receive 
the Bachelor of Arts degree, and 
21 are candidates for Masters de- 
grees. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Herman L. Albritton, James 
Woodard Barr, Jr., Margie Wilson 
Barron, Sharon Gayle Barton, 
Douglas Glynn Beach, Martha Rae 
Bedsole, Yvonne May Belgard, Jim- 
my Dale Berry, Thelma D. Blalock, 
James Alfred Bowen, Jr., Dianna 
Atkins Braden, Edgar W. Byran, 
III, Sue Burgdorf, Benny Ray Can- 
erday, Ronald D. Canerday. 

Barbara Price Colquette, Sharon 
Combs, Carrie Dykes Crenshaw, 
Robert G. Crew, Suzanne T. Cro- 
chet, Raymond E. Cupples, Mollie 
Virginia Curtis, Jo Ann V. Dauzat, 
Carmie Sue Dickson, Mary Eliz 
Dranguet. 

Max Curtis Duggan, William E. 
Ellis, Ingrid Monica Faber, Patri- 
cia Kate Gaspard, Linda Marie 
Gauthier, Farleigh M. Gray, Jr., 
Patricia M. Hartwell, Sheryl Hays, 
Jackie Sue Hodges, Sherry Sharp 
Ingram, Shelton Johnson. 

Marie Elaine LaFleur, Harold 
Joe Ledford, Sam Jude Lucero, 
Nelda Lee McCalla, Linda Mona 
McDonald, Tony L. McDonald, Tho- 
mas James McDowell, Jacqueline 
L. McLamore, Vickey Ruth Mea- 
dor, Paula P. Miller, Donald B. 
North, Brenda Briney Odom, Caro- 
lyn Wells Oglesby, Larry Emerson 
Perdue, Henry England Pickett, 
Andrew Jackson Pontz. 

James Larry Prudhomme, Frank- 
ie Powell Pyle, Barbara Ann Rac- 
hal, Beverly V. Randolph, Ginger 
R. Risley, Virginia S. Sandifer, Gar- 
vinDurwood Senn, Sandra J. Simp- 
son, Charlene R. Smith, Clark M. 
Strayhan, Mary Taylor, Rebecca 
Jean Taylor, Glenda M. Turner, 
Nancy C. Wallace, Crawford A. 
Williams, Mardel Rita Williams, 
Thomas N. Talley. 

Bachelor of Music 

Thellie Rhea Levee. 
Bachelor of Music Education 

Nelwyn Dean Norsworthy. 
Bachelor of Science 

Reuben Neal Baremore, Jerry 
Lynn Bartlett, Donald Beasley, 
Martin Talmage Bell, Georgia Ann 
Blair, Don Neil Book, Cecil E. Bos- 
well, Clyde Ray Calcote, Henrietta 
Cavanaugh, Leslie O'Neal Collier, 
Grover Cleveland Colvin, Patricia 
Anne Cooper, Douglas Eugene Cox, 
Murel Lynn Dalton, Roy K. Der- 
bonne, Jr., Betty S. Dew, Johnnie 
Lee Dickson, Betty C. Duggan, 
Katherine S. Duggan. 

Melda Rhea Dunn, Arthur Jerry 
Dyck, Lois Marilyn Ezernack, Wil- 
liam Ralph Faith, Mary Lynelle 
Ford, Frederick M. Fraser, Fred 
C. Fulton, Jr., Ragan Daniel Gantt, 
Franklin L. Gilchrist, Giles Olan 
Gilliam, William F. Golden, Clar- 
ence Glen Hardy, Gary Jude Har- 
kins, Linda Faye Harper, Hoyt W. 
Harrington, Floyd A. Jackson, El- 
mo David Jarrett, Betty Ruth 
Jones, Ellen Kay Jones, Robert 



Truett Jones. 

Donnie L. Jordon, Thomas 
Glynn Keeth, Joseph L. Kirkland 
John W. Koss, Marianna Kucinski. 
Larry Don Lee, Martha LeVasseur, 
John W. Lewis, Roger W. Lock 
ridge, William E. Long, Eugene B 
Love, James Michael Lowe, Carro 
line S. McGee, N. Gene Maddox 
James Robert Maddy, Earl Leslie 
Manning, Melvin F. Martinez, Sam- 
uel A. Masson. 

Tommy Mathis, James F. Maxey, 
Timothy W. Miciotto, Frederick A. 
Miller, Woodrow R. Mock, Jr., Bil- 
ly Wade Moore, Thurman L. Mor- 
gan, Cheryl Ann Moses, Emeric T. 
Noone, Jr., James Leslie Pearce, 
James A. Peninger, Donald Lee 
Purdy, Raymond Wayne Rabb, 
Charles E. Ragus, Gary Wayne 
Rayburn, William M. Rodes, Geo- 
rge W. Rogers, Joe Reece Salter, 
Don L. Scott, Jr., James E. Scruggs, 
Clarence T. Shipp, Arthur M. Si- 
monson, Jr., Herbert T. Smith. 

Linda JoAnn Smith, Walter M. 
Stephens, Ronald R. Stevens, Art- 
hur F. Sutherland, Patricia L. Syl- 
vester, Jimmie Fay Thomas, Robert 

D. Tilley, Judith Ann Tisdale, Wil- 
liam M. Tonglet, Beverly Ann 
Toups, Louis Claude Townsend, 
Paula Marilyn Vetter, Randall Jo- 
seph Webb, Linda Kile Weldon, 

E. Wheeler, Royce O. Willis, Sallie 
L. Wilson, J. Rush Wimberly, III, 
Jack Lamar Womack, Abner Paul, 
Wood, John Ronald Daigle. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

Sherry Ann Bamber, Carol Joy 
Buisson, Sharon Baker Byrd, Col- 
leen Marie Davis, Maureen E. Gib- 
son, Sue Barton Hill, Shirley Wyo- 
nie Jeane, Luisa Johnson, Carole C. 
Jorstad, Sandra Ann Kelly, Car- 
men M. Prestridge, Judith Ann 
Robertson, Myrna Ann Spillman, 
June E. Spurlock, Mary Elizabeth 
Stanley. 

Master of Arts 

Mary Dell Fletcher. 

Master of Arts in Education 

lone Gilbert Lawton, James Ed- 
win McGuffin, Doris Muse, James 
R. Perkins, Margaret Ann Savell, 
Evelyn Gail Slack, Charles E. Sut- 
ton, Carla Tolar Tatum, Vienna I. 
Walters, Elizabeth C. Wilson. 
Master of Education 
Alfred Louis George, Frances 
Newland, Mary C. Roberts, Betty 
C. Walmsley. 

Master of Science 
John S. Hyams, Richard D. Van 
Zandt. 

Master of Science in Education 

Hans Arnold Altorfer, Virginia 
Lee Crossno, Stina M. Hellberg, 
E. O'Brien Smith. 




HEADING THE Northwestern Student Council for the 1964-65 school year as officers are: 
(left to right)-Steve Blount, president; J. O. Charrier, vice-president; and Joe Traigle, trea- 
surer, (left to right)-Carolyn Thomas, secretary; Jean Walker, vice-president of women; 
and Calbert Marcantel, vice-president of men. 



TKEs Make Plans 
For Initiation 

Plans were made at the last TKE 
meeting for the initiation of nine 
new actives some time this month. 
Province supervisor Jim Backst- 
rom, who recently visited the Tek- 
es, praised us for the wonderful 
progress that has been made since 
the formation of the new Tekes on 
campus this year. 

The first Teke outing has been 
planned for Sunday in the form of 
a picnic and party at Red Dirt. All 
the Tekes are planning to attend 
and each anticipates a wonderful 
time. 

The Tekes are reminded that 
the chapter meetings are every 
Tuesday night at 6:30 in the meet- 
ing room of Prudhomme Hall. 



Natchitoches 
Laundromat 

936 College Avenue 

CONVENIENT TO 
ALL STUDENT? 

Open 24 hours a day 
7 days a week 



NSC Neptune Club 
Elects Officers 

The Neptune Club of Northwest- 
ern State College elected officers 
for the coming year at the regular 
meeting October 5 in the Natator- 
ium. 

Those elected were Mike Bac, 
president; Jeff Swilley, vice-presi- 
dent; Betty Morgan, secretary- 
treasurer; and Sue Riggs, publici- 
ty chairman. 

On November 12-13 the club will 



Gregory Attends Meet 

Mr. Hiram Gregory, anthropo- 
logy instructor in the Social Scien- 
ces Department of NSC, is attend- 
ing the annual meeting of the Sou- 
theastern Archaelogical Confer- 
ence in Hammond, La. 

He will present research papers 
on Indian Tradegoods found in the 
Natchitoches area of which he has 
done extensive research. 



stage its annual water show, KING 
NEPTUNE PRESENTS, at 7:30 
p.m. in the NSC Natatorium. 



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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 



1 






Northwestern State College Student Council class repre- 
sentatives are (left to right): Row 1-Jimmy Berry, Patsy 
Gaspard, and Jon Gibson, seniors; Row 2-Stanley Branton, 
Barbara Wallace, and R. J. Ardoin, juniors; Row 3-Nick 
DeJean, Betty Moore, and Milton Rhea, sophomores. 



Science Program To Be Held At NSC 
For High School Students, Teachers 



The department of Biological 
Sciences, Microbiology, and Physi- 
cal Sciences will present a two-day 
Science Program, November 13 
and 14. The department will host 
secondary school students and 
teachers on November 13 with a 
program consisting of exhibits, 
films, panel discussions and a 
guest lecturer. 

Mr. Hunter Yarborough, geo- 
physicist for Humble Oil and Re- 
fining Company, will speak on 
"The Search for Oil — Detective 
Story and Treasure Hunt". Mr. 
Yarborough holds degrees in phy- 
sics and geology from the Univer- 
sity of Texas and has for 20 years 
served as geologist for the South- 
ern United States for Humble Oil. 

Mr. Howard McCollum, state 
science supervisor, will serve as 
coordinator of a form on science 
tips and opportunities in science. 
Visiting teachers and members 
from college science departments 
will participate in the program. 

Highlighting the day will be 
exhibits and demonstrations de- 
picting the areas of Biology, Chem- 
istry, Geology, Microbiology and 
Physics. Infared spectrophotome- 
try, glass working, neon light 
micro-wave transmitter, fluores- 
cent and radioactive minerals, 
birds of Guatemala, genetics of 



Drosphila, all types of chromato- 
graphy and electrophoresis, frac- 
tionations, are only a few of over 
one hundred exhibits which will 
be open to the visitors. 

Exhibits will remain on display 
from 8 untill 11 on November 14 
for interested persons attending 
the NSC Homecoming celebration. 



Accountants Wanted 

Representatives of the U. S. Gen- 
eral Accounting Office will be on 
the Northwestern State College 
campus Tuesday and Wednesday, 
Nov. 10 and 11, to interview stu- 
dents majoring in accounting. 

Interviews will be held in the 
Business Building, according to 
N. B. Morrison, department head. 



Newman Classes 
Most Successful 

The most successful drive in the 
history of NSC's Newman Aposto- 
late was completed this week with 
125 students attending classes dur- 
ing the first week at the Newman 
Center. "We have one of the high- 
est, if not the highest student en- 
rollment in the nation," said New- 
man Chaplain, Reverend Father 
Cornelius O'Brien. 

In addition to attending the 
classes the students set up their 
committees for the coming year. 
The committees and their chair- 
men are: Building Committee, 
George Olivier; Cultural, Bill El- 
lis; Educational & Dorm Captains, 
Pam Pepperman; National Affairs, 
Bernard Vallery; Publicity, Perry 
Angle; Sacristy & Library, Margie 
Rambin; Social, James Sakovich. 



Faculty Member 
Co-authors Report 

An article entitled "Junior High 
Students Rate Their Teachers," 
written by M. J. Cousins, director 
of special education at Northwest- 
ern State College in collaboration 
with R. E. Newberry of Florida 
State University, will appear in the 
November issue of Louisiana 
Schools, publication of the Louisi- 
ana Teachers Association. 

Cousins has written another ar- 
ticle concerning a research pro- 
ject dealing with attitudes among 
parents of handicapped children 
which will appear in the forthcom- 
ing issue of the Pointer, journal 
of the Association for Special 
Class teachers. Research for the 
study was conducted at Barksdale 
Air Force Base. 



NSC Students To 
Teach At Bolton 

Irby McCan and Caroline McGee, 
both home economics majors at 
Northwestern State College, and 
Dr. Marie Dunn, department head, 
visited Bolton High School Tues- 
day to complete plans for student 
teaching at Bolton during the sec- 
ond part of this fall semester. 

Both students are scheduled to 
do student teaching in the Bolton 
High department of home econom- 
ics. 





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Goldovsky Grand Operas Performance 
Praised As One Of Best Ever At NSC 



By Dr. Joseph Carlucci 



The Northwestern-Natchitoches 
Concert Association opened its 
1964-65 artist series on a success- 
ful note last week when it present- 
ed the Goldovsky Grand Opera 
Theater of Boston in a spirited and 
sometimes moving performance of 
Puccini's popular opera, "La Bohe- 
me." A large audience of students, 
faculty and townspeople, as well as 
many from out-of-town, filled ap- 
proximately 1,000 seats in the NSC 
Fine Arts Auditorium Tuesday 
October 26, and were rewarded by 
some of the finest entertainment 
ever presented in Natchitoches by 
a touring company. 

The bittersweet tale of Bohemi- 
an artist life in the Paris of 1830 
was sung in English. While it is 
almost impossible for a singer to 
project every single word, enough 
came through to help the audience 
follow the story and to enjoy the 
comic lines. Worthy of special 
commendation were Carol Court- 
man, soprano, in the leading fe- 
male role of Mimi, a young and 
beautiful but mortally sick seam- 
stress; the orchestra was under the 
direction of Edward Alley; and the 
stage settings designed by Ray- 
mond Sovey. Miss Courtman is a 
young artist with a particularly 
fine high register and who shows 
much promise for the future. 

The orchestra consisted mainly 
of youthful professional musicians 
from the New England Conserva- 
tory of Music and the Eastman 
School of Music. The playing was 
marked by excellent precision, tone 
quality and musical expression 



throughout the performance. One 
does not always hear such finished 
work in a touring company. This 
was a pleasure and welcome sur- 
prise. The same can be said for the 
elaborate and effective stage set- 
tings for each of the four acts. 

Capable performances were also 
turned in by Jerold Siena, tenor, 
as the leading male character, the 
poet Rodolfo; Ronald Holgate as 
the painter, Marcello; J. B. Davis 
as Colline, a philosopher; and Lu- 
cien Olivier as the musician Schau- 
nard. The audience was delighted 
with the amusing second act, which 
took place at a Parisian sidewalk 
cafe. The temperamental and flir- 
tatious Musetta slyly returns to 
her lover, Marcello, and leaves her 
bumbling old escort, Alcindoro, to 
pay everyone's bill. Also amusing- 
ly done was the comic dance scene 
of the four Bohemians in their gar- 
ret apartment at the beginning of 
Act IV. The opera reached an emo- 
tional climax with the beautifully 
acted ending, where Mimi dies and 
her lover, Rodolfo, breaks into sobs 
of grief and remorse. This scene 
can be "overdone" but, as handled 
by the Goldovsky troupe last week, 
it was genuinely moving and many 
in the audience admitted to a damp 
eye as the curtain fell. 

The Goldovsky company had 
been on the road about five weeks 
upon arrival in Natchitoches and 
will be out that much more before 
returning to Boston. If the produc- 
tion given here on October 26 is 
typical, we hope Mr. Goldovsky 
will allow the group to visit Nat- 
chitoches again very soon. 



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Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1964 



President Kyser, Mayor Font Praise 
Students On Conduct In Shreveport 

Letters from President Kyser and Mayor Clyde Fant of Shreve- 
port were received last week, but they were too late for publication in 
the last issue of the "Current Sauce." 



NORTHWESTERN STATE COLLEGE CF LOUISIANA 

NATCHITOCHES. LOUISIANA 



October 29, 1964 




Mr. Duffy Wall, Editor 
The Current Sauce 
Northwestern State College 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 

Dear Duffy: 

It is a genuine pleasure for me to congratulate 
the entire student body on the fine spirit and excellent 
behavior shown during the past weekend. The officers 
of the student body and all others are herewith thanked 
to the fullest of my good feeling. I have discussed this 
subject sufficiently with others, so that I can assure 
you without contradiction that all of them share the same 
feeling . 

As part of this general accolade, I trust that you 
may have or make space to publish this letter from Mayor 
Clyde Pant of Shreveport. He has long displayed a fine 
interest in our contests, and I am sure that our respect 
for his fine record in Shreveport is enhanced by his con- 
stantly displayed interest in us. 

Sincerely, 



(^y John S. Kyser 
President 



JSK:n 
Enc. 

cc: Mrs. L u cile Hendrick 
Mr. Dudley Pulton 




OFFICE OF THE MAYOR 

SHREVEPORT, XOUISIANA 

•v October 26, 1964 



Dr. John S. Kyser, President 
Northwestern State College of Louisiana 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 

Dear Dr. Kyser: 

Captain McDowell of the Police Department, who has handled 
hundreds of parades, gave me a report Saturday evening on the Northwestern- 
Tech parade. He reports that it was one of the most orderly and well organized 
parades that he had ever handled. In addition, he said the "pep" rallies were 
well attended and, while there was much enthusiasm from both schools, all 
participating were perfect ladies and gentlemen. 

"Will you please convey to your student body our sincere appreciation 
for the excellent manner in which they conducted these activities. 

"We again apologize for the difficulty experienced by some of your 
students and supporters in reaching the Fair Grounds. There just wasn't enough 
parking space in the Fair Grounds to handle such a large crowd. We hope and 
believe it will be improved by this time next year. 

It was a pleasure to visit with you and Mrs . Kyser, as well as the 
fine representatives from your school. 

Sincerely, 



ZWTTEt FANT' y 



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The Four Seasons To Perform At NSC 
Popular Singers To Appear Nov. 16 



The Four Seasons, a popular re- 
cording group, will perform at the 
Northwestern State College Coli- 
seum, November 16, 8 p.m. 

Comprising the Four Seasons 
are Frankie Balli, Bob Gaudio, 
Nick Massi, and Tommy DeVito. 
These men banded together in the 
spring of 1960 to form a new musi- 
cal and vocal combination. Two 
played guitars, one drums and the 
fourth, an organ, through which 
they achieved a distinctive sound 
with their vocal harmony. 

Their first job was at a small 
night club in New Jersey. Every- 
thing was in readiness for the en- 
gagement - - except a name for the 
group. They just could not agree 
on one. Finally, in desperation, one 
of them suggested the name of the 
club as a temporary measure. 
Everyone concurred, and The Four 
Seasons were born. Little did they 
dream that within a few years the 
name would become a household 
word on records, television, in 



CHIEF DRIVE-IN 



Friday & Saturday 



Marlon Brando 
Shirley Jones 
In 

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—Plus- 
Nancy Kwan 
In 

"TAMAHINE" 
Both in Color 



Sun.-Mon.-Tues. 



Troy Donahue 
Suzanne Pleshette 

In 

'A DISTANT TRUMPET' 
Color 



Wednesday-Thursday 
"BUCK NIGHT" 



"PALM SPRINGS 
WEEK-END" 

— Plus— 

'MIDNIGHT LACE' 
Both in Color 



theatres and in night clubs. 

Subsequently they came to the 
attention of Bob Crewe, an indep- 
endent record producer. He used 
them largely ?o provide vocal 
backgrounds for other recording 
artists. They did this for two years. 
Finally, in 1962 Bob Gaudio wrote 
a song that seemed just right for 
the Four Seasons. It was recorded 
and released on the Vee-Jay label 
in August. Within one month, it 
caught the ear of the public and 
became a naional sensation. The 
song was "Sherry" and it sold 
over a million copies. 



CANE THEATRE 

Natchitoches, La. Phone 2922 



Friday & Saturday 



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Wednesday — Thursday 




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PANAV1SION- FROM WARNER BROS 



SPECIAL 

Homecoming 

Edition 



S auce 



VOL. LI — No. 10 Northwestern State College, Natchitoches La. Friday, Nov. 13, 1964 



Schedule 

Parade 10 a.m. 

Luncheon 11 a.m. 

Game _ 2 p.m. 

Dance _ 8 p.m. 



Welcome Home Alumni 



President Kyser Welcomes Alumni 



Dear Alumni: 

On behalf of the entire campus 
community that is Northwestern 
State College, I am priviledged and 
pleased to extend cordial best 




wishes to each and every one of 
you here today and to all others of 
our 35,000 alumni body. All of you 
who at one time or another have 
called our Old Hill "my college 
home," may not see this greeting, 



but may those of you who do see it 
carry greetings to other members 
of our college family. 

This letter might recite a hymn 
of praise about how our college 
has increased in numbers, build- 
ings, equipment, and other aspects 
of growth, but, for those of us who 
have been concerned with our de- 
velopment for many years, the sin- 
gularly important fact for us to re- 
member is the scope of what re- 
mains to be accomplished for our 
college. 

In the broad outlook for the fu- 
ture, there is nothing that even re- 
motely compares with importance 
of enrolling good students. We do 
not define those merely in terms of 
high academic ability and perfor- 
mance, for we seek those who pos- 
ses high ethical standards combin- 
ed with the spirit of initiative and 
independence that rightfully 
should be the proudest part of our 
American heritage. Regardless of 
any contributions that you have 
made for your college in the past, 
may you feel a new urge to action 
that will cause strong young men 
and women to enroll under the 
banner of Northwestern State Col- 
lege. 

Sincerely, 
John S. Kyser 
President 



In Coliseum 



Four Seasons To Appear Monday 
Student Council's Second Event 



HomecomingTheme '55,000 Strong'; 
Alumni's Activities Planned 




Fournet 



Wise 



Fournet, Wise To Be Honored Guests 
At Homecoming Festivities Saturday 




The Four Seasons will appear in 
the Northwestern Coliseum Mon- 
day night at 8 o'clock, sponsored 
by the Student Council. 

Frankie Balli; Bob Gaudio, Nick 
Massi, and Tommy DeVito banded 
together in the spring of 1960 to 
form a new musical and vocal com- 
bination. 

They came to the attention of 
Bob Crewe, an independent record 
producer. After providing vocal 
backgrounds for other recording 
artists for two years, Bob Gaudio 



wrote a song that seemed just right 
for the Four Seasons. Within one 
month after release, the record 
caught the ear of the public and 
became a national sensation. The 
song "Sherry" sold over a million 
copies. 

Since then the Four Seasons has 
become a name which is a house- 
hold word on records, television, 
in theatres ond in night clubs. 

Students will be admitted on 
their ID cards. 



Chief Justice John Baptiste 
Fournet of the Louisiana Supreme 
Court and Louisiana Adjutant Gen- 
eral Erbon Wise will be special 
honored guests and speakers at the 
Northwestern homecoming Satur- 
day. 

Presently in his third term, 
serving his thirtieth year on the 
court bench. Chief Justice Fournet 
is a 1915 graduate. He was elected 
to the Supreme Court in 1934 and 
elevated o Chief Justice in 1949. 

Judge Fournet held a number 
of state offices before beginning 
his service in the State Supreme 
Court. He served as a member and 
chairman of the Democratic Exe- 
cutive Committee for Jefferson 
Davis Parish from 1927 to 1932, 
and served as a member of the 
House of Representatives from that 
parish from 1928 to 1932. During 
a portion of his tenure he was 
Speaker of the House of Represen- 
tatives. 

In 1932 the Judge was elected 
Lieutenant Governor, a position 
that he held until he was appoint- 
ed Associate Justice of the Su- 
preme Court in 1935. 

Chief Justice Fournet is present- 
ly serving as chairman of the Ju- 
dicial Council of the Louisiana Su- 
preme Court, a council member of 
the Louisiana State Law Institute, 
chairman of the Louisiana Law Li- 
brary Advisory Commission, and a 
member of the advisory board of 
the Mineral Law Institute of the 
Louisiana State University School 
of Law. 

In addition, he is a member of 
the Conference of Chief Justices, 
the Louisiana State and American 
Bar Associations, the American 
Law Institute, and the American 
Judicature Society and of the Cri- 
minal Law Section and the Section 
on Judicial Administration of the 
American Bar Association. 

General Wise, who was appoint- 
ed Louisiana Adjutant General by 
Governor McKeithen earlier this 
year, is a 1941 graduate and pub- 
lisher of several state newspapers. 

The General enlisted in the U.S. 
Army Air Corps in 1941 and was 
commissioned in June, 1942. He 
served as finance officer in Eng- 
land, France, and Germany during 
World War II and was discharged 



as a major in February, 1946. 
Since then he has been in the 
Army Reserve. 

Now finance officer of the 
4263rd Logistical Command B in 
Lake Charles, Wise graduated 
from the U.S. Army Command and 
General Staff College at Fort Lea- 
He is presently serving on the 
board of directors of the NSC 
Alumni Association, president of 
the Southwest Builder, Inc., and 
Wise Publications, Inc., Chairman 
of the board of directors of the 
West Bank Guide, Inc., and part- 
ner in Wise-Makar Publications. 
He has interest in a total of 12 
newspapers and legal publications. 
In addition to his business interest, 
Gen. Wise is active in civic and 
professional organizations. 



Bradford Attends 
Literary Meet 

Dr. Melvin E. Bradford, assis- 
tant professor of English, South 
ern literature, and literary critic- 
ism is attending the annual con- 
vention of the South-Central Mod- 
ern Languages Association, a pro- 
fessional association of college 
teachers of languages and litera- 
ture, at Texas Tech in Lubbock, 
Texas. 

Dr. Bradford will present the 
principal paper to be read on the 
topic program, "Brotherhood and 
the Bear", which will be published 
in Modern Age, a conservative re- 
view, in either the spring or sum- 
mer edition. Reports of results of 
scholarship and reviews of re- 
search will be given by other 
visiting conventioners. 



Placement Office 
Sets Interviews 

On Thursday, November 19, a 
representative of Humble Oil Com- 
pany will be in the College Place- 
ment Office to interview January 
graduates. The company will meet 
students of all backgrounds, with 
no particular major desired. 

Positions to be filled are in the 
production, research, management, 



With the theme "55,000 Strong," 
committees under the direction of 
Alumni Secretary Joe W. Webb 
are planning a full day's slate of 
activities for returning graduates 
and former students for the annual 
Homecomjng Saturday. 

Although all graduates and for- 
mer students will be honored dur- 
ing the day, members of the class- 
es of 1894, 1904, 1914, 1924, 1934, 
1944, 1954, and the spring and sum- 
mer graduates of 1964 will be es- 
pecially recognized, according to 
Alumni Association President Ray 
W. Scott, mayor of Natchitoches. 

The Association is divided into 
seven active chapters located in 
Shreveport, Alexandria, Lake Char- 
les, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, 
Monroe and Houston, Texas. 

Activities will begin with coffee 
and registration in the drawing 
room of Varnado Hall from 8 to 

10 a.m. Science exhibits in biology, 
microbiology, chemistry and phy- 
sics will be on display in William- 
son and Fournet Halls from 8 to 

11 a.m. 

The Alumni Board of Directors 
will meet in the Alumni Office 
from 9 to 10 a.m. Officers of the 
board are President Ray Scott, 
Natchitoches; Vice-president Her- 
schel Russell, Shreveport; and Sec- 
retary-treasurer Joe Webb, Natch- 
itoches. 

Other members of the board are 
S. M. Shows, Mansfield; Van D. 
Odom, Monroe; T. P. Sutherland, 
Alexandria; and Monroe Webb, 
Church Point. 

The annual parade under the di- 
rection of Ralph V. Fell head of 
the department of agriculture and 
his committee of W.H. Ainsworth, 
LeRoi Eversull, Jimmy Lee, Hal 
Townsend, George Ware, and Steve 
Blount will leave campus on its 
downtown route at 10 a.m. 

Honorable John B. Fournet, 
Chief Justice of the Louisiana Sup- 
reme Court; and Erbon W. Wise, 
Adjutant-General of Louisiana 
will be the distinguished alumni at 
the Alumni Luncheon in St. Denis 
Cafeteria at 11 a.m. Officers for 
the coming year will be elected at 
the business session. 

Pre-game ceremonies for the 
football contest between the NSC 
Demons and the Bulldogs of the 
University of Southwestern Louis- 
iana will get underway at 1:40 p.m. 
Homecoming Queen Carolyn Tho- 
mas and her court, Ramona Rey- 
nolds, Bonnie Gorum, Nora Jane 
Colvin, Mrs. Pamela Fulton, Geor- 
gia Blair, Patricia Cooper, and 
Catherine Cook will be presented. 
The Black Knight drill team will 
also perform. Game time is 2 p.m. 
in Demon Stadium. 

Following the football game, the 
"N" Club graduates will meet at 
the VFW Home on Touline Street; 
and the Homecoming Dance will 
be held from 8 p.m. to midnight. 
Fraternities and sororities, as well 
as the housing facilities will be 
holding "Open House" all day. 



sales, and marketing departments, 
and others. 

Appointments for this interview 
may be obtained from Mr. Joe W. 
Webb, Director of Placement, in 
the Placement Office, Room 19, 
Caldwell Hall. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1964 



NSC Theatre Will Present Play 
Entitled "Ladies In Retirement" 



Northwestern State College The- 
atre will present a three act play 
entitled "Ladies In Retirement" 
November 19 and 20 at 8 p.m. in 
the Fine Arts Auditorium. 

"Ladies In Retirement" concerns 
the strange and sudden disappear- 
ance of an ex-actress from her 
country estate. The play challenges 
the cast and promises to please the 
audience with eight interesting 
characterizations. These personali- 
ties are under the direction of Dr. 
Edna West. They talk, sing, walk, 
run, love and laugh all over a little 
country cottage created by Mr. 
Frank Majors, director of techni- 
cal operations. 

Margaret Montgomery, Anne 
Weaver and Frances Councill tack- 
le the roles of the three sisters: 
Eileen, Louisa and Emily. The role 
of the ex-actress, Leonora Fiske, is 
portrayed by Pat Delano. Danny 
Gayer and Gloria Alexander as Al- 
bert Feather and Lucy Gilham, re- 
present the younger set as they 
play the game of Wolf and Flirt. 
John Bates, the dated chaufeur of 
the group, is played by John Alli- 
son. Barbara Russel and Sandra 
Royer will double as Sister The- 
resa. 

Production crews for the play 
are as follows: Assistant to the 
Director: Mary Ellen Davis; Lights: 
Doyle Williams, Lawrence Vickers, 

Delta Zeta Holds 
Standards Meeting 
For Homecoming 

Epsilon Beta Chapter of Delta 
Zeta held a standards meeting 
Tuesday, October 27. Mrs. Johni- 
kin, a representative of Merle Nor- 
man products and a very capable 
cosmetologist, demonstrated the 
of make-up using Susie Blackburn 
as her subject. 

Delta Zetas honored their little 
sisters with a surprise pledge 
breakfast Friday, November 6. Af- 
ter a snack of chocolate milk and 
doughnuts, the pledges entered in- 
to a pajama parade. Linda Aycock 
was chosen sexiest pledge and 
Grace Wilson the speepiest pledge. 

Delta Zeta congratulates its sis- 
ter Carolyn Thomas who has been 
chosen Homecoming Queen. Caro- 
lyn and her court will be present- 
ed at the NSC-USL football game 
Saturday afternoon. After the 
game, Delta Zeta will sponsor an 
Open House in their room in Cald- 
well Hall. Refreshments will be 
served to Delta Zeta parents, alum- 
nae, and other guests attending. 



Natchitoches 
Laundromat 

936 College Avenue 

CONVENIENT TO 
ALL STUDENTf 

Open 24 hours a day 
7 days a week 



Typewriters 

FOR RENT 

ROYAL and REMINGTON 
STANDARDS 

These factory reconditioned 
machines may be bought on 
rental-purchase plan. 



BAKER 

Printing & Office Supply 
124 St. Denis Phone 2935 



and Phyllis Guidry; Sound: Jim 
Hawthorne, Betty Bloch, and Betty 
Morgan; Costumes: Susan Hemp- 
hill, Janie Armstrong, and Cyn- 
thia Milton; Publicity: Harvey Wil- 
son, Mary Ellen Davis, and Bill 
Rowell; Make-up: Ramona Rey- 
nolds, Carol Ann Adkins, Mary 
Lawless, Andrea Barnett, Rose Ma- 
rie Suckow, Johnnie Hall, and 
Sherry Albertson; Scenery: Milton 
Tarver, William Rowell, Frances 
Councill, Danny Gayer, Linda 
Jackson, Michael Caldwell, David 
Durr, Lawrence Vickers, and Anne 
Weaver. 




Tri Sig Names New 
Pledge Officers 

All Tri Sigmas are in the camp- 
us swing as mid-term of the fall 
semester approaches. Many are 
participating in campus activities 
and receiving honors. 

Recently elected pledge class of- 
ficers are: Robin Butler, president; 
Wanda Seger, vice-president; Shir- 
ley Baglio, secretary; and Judy 
Wenner, treasurer. The following 
members and pledges have been 
elected as dormitory officrs: Betty 
Jo Cook, social chairman, South 
Natchitoches; Dottie Stone, presi- 
dent, East Varnado; Catherine 
Wall, vice-president, East Varna- 
do; Sarah Grunwall, secretary- 
treasurer, West Varnado. Sarah is 
also a freshman associate to the 
Student Council. 

On October 15, the Tri Sigmas 
entertained the football team at 
an informal get-together at the 
House. Rootbeer and pretzels wtere 
served and introductions were 
made by the coaches. 

Also along the lines of enter- 
tainment, the Tri Sigma pledges 
gave a Halloween Party on Octo- 
ber 29 for the pledges of all sorori- 
ties. 

Tri Sigmas join other collegiates 
in welcoming alumni to our annual 
Homecoming. Following the pa- 
rade and game there will be a re- 
ception at the House where coffee 
will be served. 

Saturday night all Sigmas are 
looking forward to the annual Big 
Sister-Little Sister slumber party 
at which the identity of the Big 



Jean Walker has been chosen as 
Blue Key Darling for this year. 
She was selected at the last meet- 
ing of the Blue Key Fraternity. To 
be named to this position the girl 
must maintain the same require- 
ments as the members of the or- 
ganization. 



Sisters will be revealed, and gifts 
and poems will be exchanged. En- 
tertainment will be provided by a 
most talented group of pledges. 

Cheering our team to a Home- 
coming victory will be Sigmas Pam 
Rushing, Ann Kovar, and Judy 
Gowland. 



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KA Fraternity 
Announces Plans 

The big news this weekend for 
members of Gamma Psi Chapter is 
the annual Homecoming festivities 
and football game. Preparations 
have been completed by the social 
committee through the efforts of 
the chairman Tim Miciotto. On the 
agenda for the day will be, first, an 
open house for parents and guests. 
Then, of course, the chapter will be 
present at the game to cheer the 
Demons on to a big victory over 
USL. Following the game will be 
a dance featuring the "Uniques" at 
St. Mary's Auditorium for members 
and our fellow brothers from Gam- 
ma Phi Chapter at USL. We all are 
hoping to enjoy another great 
weekend and extend these same 
wishes to the entire student body. 

On Thursday, November 5, the 
whole chapter witnessed a most ex- 
citing and tough intramural foot- 
ball game. It was the biggest game 
of the season for our chapter since 
we renewed our annual tangle 
with Sigma Tau Gamma. It was a 
well played, hard fought game in 
which our team scored a touch- 
down, made the point after and got 
a safety. Our rivals put up a good 
fight but didn't quite make it. The 
sky grew dark, and the game was 
called and arranged to be complet- 
ed Monday Nov. 9 with approxima- 
tely 40 seconds left to go. Our 
teams met again, and in what could 



Sigma Tau Pledges 
Elect Officers 

The Sigma Tau pledge class el- 
ected officers October 28. Those 
elected were: Fred Elzen, presi- 
dent; Joey Calloway, secretary- 
treasurer; Barry Guillet, Sergent- 
at-arms; Jim McMann, chaplin. 
These officers have the honor of 
leading the largest pledge class on 
campus this year. 

Sigma Tau will have a coffee for 
alumni, all greeks, and special 
guests homecoming at the Sigma 
Tau's house "on the hill." 

Eric Stienhausee, vice-president 
of Northwester n's Nu Chapter; 
Jolly Gilliam, pledge trainer and 
Sigma Sigma Sigma's Man of the 
Year; and Sam Lucero, secretary 
of Nu chapter and Delta Zeta's 
Man of the Year attended the Sig- 
ma Tau Gamma National Conven- 
tion which was held this summer 
at St. Louis, Missouri. 



have been sudden death for either 
side, held the opponents to a 9-8 
loss. 

We should like to announce that 
our plans for the Children's Christ- 
mas Party are progressing nicely. 
Brothers Thorn Williams and Tim 
Miciotto will attend a committee 
meeting of parents of these child- 
ren this week so they may organ- 
ize this event in the best possible 
manner. 




STUDENTS 

Let us pamper your 
parents when they come 
to visit you. 

For Room Reservations 
dial 6401 

'Wake-up Coffee and Papers' 



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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 




College PR Destroyed 
By Phone Operators 

The College strives constantly to build and maintain a 
good public image, yet one most important facet of the public 
relations program is allowed to go unattended year ofter year. 
The discourteous telephone operators at Northwestern have 
been brought to the attention of the Administration on numer- 
ous occasions through editorials, letters and other means. But, 
nothing seems to impress them of the importance of this issue. 

Every time a telephone is answered at the College, good 
will is either created or destroyed. The image of the Institution 
created by those who receive the telephone calls is of funda- 
mental importance to the College. 

The telephone operator who answers the phone speaks 
for the College. For all practical purposes she is the College to 
thousands of people who call every year. How the operator 
acts, how she performs, how she treats all of those with whom 
she has contacts will determine, to a large extent, what the 
public thinks of the College. In many cases the woman who 
answers the telephone may not only be the "initial" contact 
with the College, but in a great number of instances, she may 
be the "only" contact they will ever have. 

It has long been said that, "The first impression is the 
most important one." This being the case, the person finally 
receiving a call through the telephone operator at Northwest- 
ern must not only project a good image of himself, but also 
recreate a new impression of the College. For, one may be 
assured, the first impression was not a very favorable one. 

The telephone operators at Northwestern convey the im- 
pression that they are doing you a service to even put a call 
through and generally their attitude is that of extreme an- 
noyance. It is not at all uncommon to be requested to wait 
"just a moment" and find yourself dangling for three or four 
minutes with no response, and then have the operator return 
and say, "That extension is busy, would you hang up." Never 
a "Please" or "Thank you." 

One must really be a glutton for trouble to even attempt 
to get anyone's dormitory extension. For the operator to busy 
herself with such useless chores is, in her opinion, service 
above and beyond the call of duty. If she finally gets around 
to giving you the desired information she states it once, and 
you had better be listening closely because she usually breaks 
the connection while the last word is being spoken. 

This is no imaginary problem. It is as real and as serious 
as any on the Campus. And, until this situation is corrected, 
our endeavors to create a favorable public image are futile. 
Nothing anyone else can do will nullify the bad impression 
portrayed on every call to the campus between the hours of 
8 a.m. and 3 p.m. 



LITTLE MA NOKT CAMPUS 




PROFESSOR — YOU LL FEEL YOLK OU? 5E\JP \U MO TIMET," 




Swinging Greek Chick 

Dingo And Bongothes 



By Tom 

Editor's note-The following story 
was written as an assignment in a 
freshman English class. Several 
other stories of this nature will be 
used throughout th esemester, and 
anyone is welcome to submit any 
creative writing to be considered 
for publication. 

(an ancient tale of a tragic love 
affair revised with the modern 
reader in mind.) 

Dingo, the swingingest chick in 
all of ancient Greece and then 
some, swung on over to the hitch- 
ing rail to tie the knot with Bongo- 
thes, a two-bit expresso-house oper- 
ator from uptown Athens. 

When news got around that she 
had eloped with a perculator joc- 
key, it shook the rugs off every 
chin in downtown Athens. The 
long-hairs just couldn't cut the idea 
that this cool bundle of female 
should hitch with a north-side 
flunkie instead of one of them. At 
first, they tried to make her split 
the matrimony scene, figuring that 
basically she was still as cool as 
ever. But Dingo wouldn't split, so 
her friends got together and elect- 
ed her Miss Fink of the Year, told 
her to flake off, and from then on, 
slipped her the frigid clavicle every 
time she happened to cross scenes 
with the old group. 

Her "momo" and "popo" couldn't 
seem to roll with the punch either. 
They just dug a terrified scene and 
yelled "low blow!" for a week. Af- 
ter the initial shock, however, they 
knew just how to cool off the whole 
affair. They spun out with the 
"tried and true" "Wrathful Pa- 
rents" bit. Man, they played it cool 
and sweet. First, they cut Ding off 
from the family fortune, and then 
got the whole clan to bop over at 
their convenience and swing with 
a few reliable family curses. 

Dingo couldn't have cared less. 
She had all she needed as long as 
she could snuggle up to Bongo at 
night and listen to "African Bird 
Calls" by Al Newmanothes on the 
stereo. 

Now naturally, since this was a 
cool act from the love-and-sacrifice 
angle, it really sent old Cupid 
swinging. He hopped into his sun- 
colored XKE chariot and bopped 
on over to Mount Olympus (catch- 
ing rubber in all four gears). When 
he got there he laid the scene on 
the table, hoping that Zeus would 
dig it. Zeus, being basically a sw- 
inger and owing Cupid a favor any- 
way (ever since that night in Ve- 
gas), told him to go ahead and 
make with the three-wishes bit. 

Dingo and Bongo were sitting in 
their place knocking off some crazy 
poetry ("I Left My Sandals in the 
Praesidium Restroom" and some 
other Greek beat favorites.) Cupid 
came up in his hot machine and 
ground to a halt and twisted cooly 
through the swinging doors. 

Then he made with the conver- 
sation. 

"Hail Ding and Bongo!" 
"We don't cut smooth talk in 
this pad, mister. State your case or 
split," said Bongo, obviously per- 
turbed over the interruption. 

"You know who I am?" asked 
Cupid. 

"If you're one of my distant re- 
latives, just scribble your curse on 
a sheet of paper and give it to the 
cigarette girl," Ding said. 

"You see my racket wrong, 



Rowan 

baby," said Cupid. "I'm a god-Cu- 
pid!" 

"Yeah, and I'm the Easter Bun- 
ny," said Ding. 

"Not so frantic, baby," said Bon- 
go. "He's leveling. Look! Here's 
his picture in Who's Who on Oly- 
mpus." 

That's my bad side they took," 
Cupid said apologetically. 

"O.K.," said Bongo, "Throw a 
few syllables at us, cool man!" 

"Yeah, sure! And if I leave my 
tooth under my pillow, I suppose 
the good fairy leaves me a drach- 
ma or two, huh?" remarked Ding, 
obviously suspicious of a double 
scene. 

"I've come to give Ding the 
three-wishes bit." 

Finally, Cupid succeeded in con- 
vincing Ding and Bong that he was 
on the level. 

"Anything else I can do while 
I'm here?" asked Cupid. 
"Two things," Bong said. 
"Name 'em." 

"Tell me where you got that 
crazy rod you got parked outside." 
"Apollos' OK Used-wheels Lot!" 
"Crazy." 
"Wasn't there one more thing 
you wanted me to do?" 
"Yeah." 
"What?" 

"Get your big toe out of my cup 
of expresso!" 

"Cool, baby, cool!" 
The next day Ding and Bong 
were really set. They had more 
drachmas than the Athens branch 
of Fort Knox. They had the coolest 
wardrobe in town and owned the 
most exclusive nightclub in the 
square. Add up what they got. You 
get three things. Three wishes - - 
three grants. Cupid now leads the 
divine league with a 1.000 batting 
average. 

Things were really swinging 
from then on. The joint was jump- 
ing every night with all the top 
singers in the business. The first 
week they had Pluto, Paul, and 
Mary for a limited engagement. 
The regular group was Pythagoras 
and his Three Angles. Aphrodite 
even a stint there once, billed as 
a belly dancer. Man, that place 
hopped. 

But all was not to stay hep with 
Ding and Bong. One night when 
Zues and the Thunderbolts were 
playing, Zues the drummer was 
sweating over a note he couldn't 
get on his snare, tom-tom, bass, or 
any of his other canvas-top cans. 
Bong decided to let the old guy 
drown his sorrows. 

"Look, Zeus," Bong said, "go see 
Bacchus, my bartender. He'll make 
you forget your problem." 

Zeus got going and kept going. 
He just chug-a-lugged like Hades! 
Pretty soon he was over the hill. 

Bongo was walking around 
checking out the nights' attendan- 
ce when he noticed Zeus trying to 
make time with Dingo. Knowing 
Zeus's reputation, he didn't dig the 
scene. He called over Ares, his 
bouncer, and had Zeus thrown out 
on his ear. 

The next day Zeus awakened in 
Mt. Olympus Central Hospital 
nursing one Hades of a hangover 
and a broken cartilidge in his ear. 
He gave Gladys, his favorite sor- 
ceress, a call and told her she had 
two jobs. First, she must make 
him the kind of drum he could 



LETTERS 

Dear Sir: 

I am going to begin this disserta- 
tion by explaining a recent prob- 
lem I had with the Attendance Of- 
ficer. 

I am a sophomore (2-2) lacking 
five hours being a junior. I have 
maintained over a 2.0 average 
while amassing these hours. I am 
20 years old, and I have had a tour 
of duty in the Armed Services of 
our country. My father is a physi- 
cian in a town which is a little over 
50 miles from Natchitoches. Re- 
cently I had a legitimate excuse 
from him excusing me from class- 
es on Tuesday, Thursday and Sat- 
urday of the week October 11-18, 
1964. 

On the following Monday, Octo- 
ber 19th, I went to the Attendance 
Officer to get my absences ex- 
cused. Since I am a full-time stu- 
dent and living on campus, I do 
not go home on weekends very 
often and never during the week 
unless illness requires it. On this 
particular occassion I did not go 
home until the weekend although 
I did write for the medicine re- 
quired. 

The Demon Handbook states on 
page 12, that an Attendance Offi- 
cer may or may not excuse a pa- 
rent's or doctor's excuse on the 
grounds of her belief in the valid- 
ity of the excuse. I was not excus- 
ed on the following grounds: 

(1) Tardiness of the excuse. 

(2) The absences were not on 
successive days. 

(3) I was attending school on 
the intermittent days. 

Now I ask you, does an Atten- 
dance Officer have the knowledge 
to say if an individual is sick? 
Should an Attendance Officer have 
the power to overrule a doctor's 
excuse? Is an Attendance 
Officer a diety that may dictate 
when and where a person may be 
sick? Does a student who has the 
qualification that I mentioned in 
preface to this assertation have to 
stand still at being told that his 
father, a doctor of medicine, is eit- 
her lying or else doesn't know the 
occupation which he has dedicated 
20 years of his life studying and 
more than 30 years practicing? 
Muchly Offended, 
(Name witheld by request) 

swing on. Second, she should rub 
out Bongothes. 

Gladys, being an up-to-date 
chick, knew just what to do. She 
reached up on her shelf for potion 
143, and that night sprinkled it on 
Bongo's hominy grits. (Since Bong 
was from Southern Greece he ate 
that every day!) When he ate it he 
was immediately changed, but not 
into a frog - - Gladys was much too 
original, resourceful, cunning, and 
cheap for that. He was changed in- 
to a drum - - just the type Zeus 
needed. 

Zeus's conscience began to hurt 
him and he looked for Gladys to 
tell her to change Bong back, but 
Gladys had split for good. So Zeus 
did the best he could to honor the 
deceased. He made him his favo- 
rite drum, had his mass-manufactu- 
red (every swinging Greek should 
own one . . . ) and gave the drum 
Bongothes's nickname. He called 
it the Bongo drum! 

TS urrent Sauce 

ESTABLISHED 1914 

Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
tne fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
scription S3 the year payable in advance. 

Member of the Associated Collegiate Press 

D«tfy Wall Editor 

-in-Chief 

Sharon H.ilman Associate Editor 

V'"? a W ?£ er N< ™s Editor 

Sports Editor 

r^". ^ aU - Society Editor 

John Lewis Business Manager 

Linda Broughton .... Advertising Manager 

£S r'T." -V Staff Artist 

Roy G. Clark Faculty Adviser 

Editorial Staff: Mary Ellen Davis, Walley 
Hebert, Kenneth Baker. * 

m E ^L t0rialS , 5u" ect only tne "Pinions of 
members of the staff. They do not reflect 
the opinions of the student body or the 
administration and faculty of the college. 

I'he Current Sauce prints the news im 
partially. It supports what it believes to 
be right, and opposes what it believes to 
be wrong, regardless. "="eves to 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1964 




Barridge Manipulates 

Benny Barridge, graduate student in Microbiology at Nor- 
thwestern, operates a radiochemistry hood for transferr- 
ing radioactive materials. This apparatus and several oth- 
er scientific instruments will be part of an exhibit as a part 
of a science day program at Northwestern, today. The pro- 
gram is for secondary school students and teachers but is 
also open to the public. 

Demons Lose Second Conference Game; 
McNeese Gets Win In Final Period 



Northwestern dropped its sec- 
ond straight Gulf States Confer- 
ence game Saturday night as the 
McNeese Cowboys came from be- 
hind to take a 12-10 decision. 

Down by 10-6 going into the fi- 
nal period, the Cowboys from Lake 
Charles managed to put across ano- 
ther six-pointer with an 80 yard 
scoring drive which saw Richard 
Guillory closing out the march with 
a 15 yard sprint into the end zone. 

Halfback Charles Anastasio and 
fullback Merlin Walet combined to 
amass a total of 237 yards on the 
ground with Anastasio picking up 
135 and Walet 102, each on 16 car- 
ries. 

Northwestern's top runner was 
fullback Bobby Parker, going 29 
yards on nine carries. 

Neither team could muster a 
score in the first period of play. 
The Demons came within field goal 
range late in the quarter, and kick- 
ing specialist Jimmy Scott was sent 
in to try for the three points; how- 
ever, the attempt failed when the 
snap from center sailed over his 
head, and Scott recovered on the 
50 where McNeese took over. 

The Cowboys went on to score 
with only 1:22 gone in the second 
quarter as Anastasio tallied from 
the 10. The score remained 6-0 as 
the kick for the extra point was 



wide. 

NSC did not score until early in 
the third quarter as the tough 
Cowboy line held the Demons to 
only two first downs in the first 
half. 

The score came on a 25 yard 
field goal by Jimmy Scott, his 
third of the season. 

End Dick Reding played his 
usual good game recovering a fum- 
ble in the third quarter and scor- 
ing on a 62 yard pass with 9:06 
remaining in the game, and Red- 
ing evaded all would be tacklers 
to race into the end zone standing 
up. 





life®**, jt 











Teachers Attend 
Southern History 
Association Meet 

The Southern History Associa- 
tion is holding a meeting in Little 
Rock, Ark., November 12-14. North- 
western is being represented by 
the following members of the his- 
tory staff: Dr. Henlein, Dr. Donald 
Rawson, Dr. Tom Wells, Mr. Bobby 
Quinton, Miss Marietta LeBreton, 
Mr. Charles S. Gallien, and Miss 
Jeanie Marler. 

The Southern History Associa- 



Crosby Arranges 
Program For ACS 

Dr. Alan H. Crosby of North- 
western State College has arranged 
the technical program of 184 re- 
ports for the American Chemical 
Society's 20th Southwest Regional 
Meeting to be held in Shreveport 
December 3 to 5. 

Six hundred chemists and chemi- 
cal engineers from five states are 
expected to attend the meeting, 
according to Dr. Edward C. Greco, 
meeting chairman and senior re- 
search associate at the United Gas 
Corporation, Shreveport. Dr. Greco 
is an authority on corrosion prob- 
lems in the oil and gas industries. 

Professor Raymond Reiser of 
Texas A & M University will re- 
ceive the Southwest Regional 
Award at a banquet on Friday 
evening. Dr. Reiser is being honor- 
ed for his research on how the 
body digests, stores, and uses fats. 

Dr. W. O. Milligan, a director of 
the American Chemical Society 
and president of the Texas Christ- 
ian Research Foundation; Dr. W. 
Albert Noyes, Jr., past president 
of the American Chemical Society; 
and James P. Conkle of the U.S. 
Air Force School of Aerospace 
Medicine will be the three plenary 
lecturers. 

New ACS standards for the 
teaching of college chemistry is 
the topic of a Saturday symposium. 
Participants include Dr. Hebert E. 
Carter of the University of Illinois, 
chairman of the ACS committee on 
professional training, and Dr. Lew- 
is N. Pino, program director for 
the undergraduate science educa- 
tion program of the National Sci- 
ence foundation. 

Other advances will be reported 
in the fields of computers in in- 
dustrial chemistry, corrosion, bio- 
chemistry, analytical chemistry, 
physical chemistry, chemical edu- 
cation, organic chemistry, inorgan- 
ic chemistry, and industrial and 
engineering chemistry. 

Twenty five American Chemical 
Society Sections from five states — 
Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico, Ok- 
lahoma, and Arkansas — are taking 
part in the meeting. The American 
Chemical Society, with a member- 
ship of 99,000 chemists and chemi- 
cal engineers, is one of the world's 
largest scientific associations. 



Hackes Speaks On US Space Program; 
Predicts US Is Ahead Of Russia 



By Sharon Hillman 
Associate Editor 

NBC news defense correspond- 
ent Peter Hackes gave the address, 
"Space-What's In It For Us?" to 
1500 Northwestern students and 
faculty members Monday at 10 
a.m. in the Coliseum. 

Mr. Hackes opened his speech 
by saying that he was delighted to 
be in Natchitoches, but even more 
delighted to be able to pronounce 
it. 

After this, he began on his topic 
stating that the space program is 
here to stay; America has to go 
into space. He explained the criti- 
cism of the program by saying that 
even the smoothest running opera- 
tion would be considered open to 
criticism, which is an American 
freedom. 

The space program authority 
continued, "It is more than just 
getting there. There are plans for 
a large colony on the moon, space 
stations and taxis orbiting the 
earth, and passenger travel on 
earth by rocket. A trip from Cape 
Kennedy to Paris would take only 
38 minutes. There is a possibility 
of nuclear war between space ve- 
hicles, manned or unmanned. Re- 
cently discovered light beams 
} could be used as death rays." 

"In many areas, we are far a- 
head of the Russians. There are 
92 United States satellites orbiting 
the earth compared to only 15 
Russian. Of the 289 satellites laun- 
ched 70 per cent are stamped 
'Made in the USA'. Secret launch- 
ings by the military outnumber 
the civilian launchings two to one," 



Mr. Hackes told the audience. 

The journalist said that the 7.2 
billion spent on the space pro- 
gram was not as much as was 
spent on farm supports. The 20 
billion dollars that it will cost to 
put a man on the moon could be 
supplied by the liquor taxes. By 
1970 the program will be paying 
the dividend of a dime for every 
nickle invested in it. 

Mr. Hackes concluded by telling 
about some of the new products 
that have been introduced as a re- 
sult of the space race. Among 
these are many new plastics, elec- 
tronic stethescopes and thermo- 
meters, a hearing aid so small that 
it can be placed underneath the 
skin, radios the size of a sugar 
cube, an artificial larynx, and tele- 
visions that may be swallowed to 
help alleviate gastric disorders, 
and methods of weather predic- 
tion and control. Also thousands 
of new jobs and ideas have been 
introduced, thus employing 3,000 
new people. 



Tryouts Slated 
For Stage Band 

The Northwestern Stage Band 
will hold auditions Monday Nov. 
23rd at 4 p.m. in the Fine Arts In- 
strumental Room. 

There are openings in all sec- 
tions: trumpets, trombones, saxo- 
phones, piano, bass, guitar, drums, 
male and female vocalists. 

Membership is by audition only 
and any student, regardless of ma- 
jor, is eligible to try out. 



Let Us Help Make Your 1964 HOMECOMING 
a Most Enjoyable One 

For Reservation at 

EL Camino Motel and Restaurant 

"The House of Hospitality" 
Highway 6 West Phone 4426 



tion is an organization of profes- 
sional historians who are dedicated 
to original research. Most of the 
members are college teachers and 
professors of history and, as a gen- 
eral rule, come from the Southern 
States. The SHA publishes a quar- 
terly journal at Rice University in 
Houston, Texas. Research papers 
that are read to the Association 
and some that are submitted by 
professors of history are published 
in this journal. 



COLONIAL FLOWER SHOPPE 
Welcomes Alumni 

SEE US FOR YOUR FLOWERS AND 
COMPLETE FLORAL NEEDS 

422 Second Street 



WORK 
IN EUROPE 

Grand Duchy of Luxembourg 
— Every registered student can 
get a job in Europe through the 
American Student Information 
Service, and the first 5000 appli- 
cants receive $250 travel grants. 
It is possible to earn $300 a month 
from a job selection that includes 
lif eguarding, child care and other 
resort work, office, sales, ship- 
board, farm and factory work. 
Job and travel grant applications 
and complete details are availa- 
ble in a 36-page illustrated book- 
let which students may obtain by 
sending $2 (for the booklet and 
airmail postage) to Dept. N, 
ASIS, 22 Ave. de la Liberte, Lux- 
embourg City, Grand Duchy of 
Luxembourg. 




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SECOND AND ST. DENIS 
PHONE 2386 




FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1964 






BY UEfiW 30.1 LL 



Members of the NSC football 
squad seem to be taking advan- 
tage of their insurance policies as 
the injury list seems to be a mile 
long. Pulled muscles, bad ankles, 
bad knees, shoulders, or ribs, all 
of these injuries can be found down 
in the Demon football camp. As 
one sports writer so plainly put it 
the other day, you can tell a foot- 
ball player by the way he limps. 
Things seem to be getting better 
though, and we hope everyone will 
be able to go for the battle with 
the Bulldogs of Southwestern. 

One of the latest injuries belongs 
to Jimmy Scott. Scott has been tac- 
kled once this year and that was in 
the McNeese game. Result, one 
hurt elbow. 

Last week not only produced 
upsets for football fans, it also pro- 
duced headaches for football pre- 
dictors. The downfall of two unde- 
feated clubs, Florida's flop to 
Georgia, and good old Tulanes loss 
helped to drop the average. There 
were 11 games tabbed correctly in 
this column for an average of .733. 

Six of the games were guessed 
within five points. The season's re- 
cord now stands at 51-12-3 for a 
.733 average. Not knowing where 
to stop, here goes again. 

NSC (9) over USL - - - Demons 
are hurt but hungry. Bulldogs show 
that their bark is worse than their 
bite. 

McNeese (7) over Southeastern - 
Cowboys are riding high after vic- 
tory over NSC. Could rap up a se- 
cond place finish in the GSC. 

Southern Miss. (6) over La. 
Tech - - - Techmen find the going 



rough in Mississippi as Southerners 
take the bite out of the Bulldogs 
and give Poly their first defeat. 

LSU (14) over Miss. State - - - 
Mighty tigers turn back to hungry 
Bengals as they try to get revenge 
over last years disputed game. 

Alabama (10) over Georgia 
Tech - - - Engineers trying to find 
a way to build bridges over a pow- 
erful moving tide. 

Tennessee (3) over Ole Miss 
Tennessee proves that the Volun- 
teers are really football players. 

Vanderbilt (20) over Tulane - - - 
The Commodores find clear sailing 
over the green wave. 

Texas (14) over TCU - - . The 
Frogs are good for a half but there 
are two halves in a football game. 

Rice (7) over Texas A&M - - - 
Owls have not had much to hoot 
about lately but once they fly high 
in night game at Houston. 

Notre Dame (14) over Michigan 
State - - - Its not St. Patrick's day 
but Irishmen seem to still have 
their four leaf clover as they move 
on to an undefeated season. 

Texas Tech (24) over Washing- 
ton State - - - Lone Star club con- 
tinues to roll. 

Arkansas (14) over SMU - - - A 
lopsided win could move the Razor- 
backs on to a national champion- 
ship. 

Ohio State (7) over Northwest- 
ern - - - One defeat is too many as 
Buckeyes keep up bid for a trip to 
the Rose Bowl. 

Kentucky (2) over Baylor . - - ? 

Auburn (6) over Georgia - - - 
Home field advantage gives this 
one to Sidles crew. 



Women's Volleyball Team Captures 
Intercollegiate Net Tournament 



Northwestern's Girl's Volleyball 
team traveled to Memphis, Tenn- 
essee last week-end to compete in 
and win the Tri-State Intercollegi- 
ate Volleyball Tournament. The 
Varsity took the "A" division 
championship with a 14-, 8-10, 15-5 
victory over host Memphis State 
University in the finals. 

Memphis State had won the tour- 
nament for the preceding four 
years in a row. This was North- 
western's first time to enter the 
tournament. 

Leading the team to victory was 
Jinks Coleman, Captain. Other 
members of the varsity squad were 
Rose Masaraca, Roberta Wescott, 
Sandra Foster, Cecil McPherson, 
Linda Harper, and Shirley Hill- 
man. 

Southwestern College of Mem- 
phis foiled Northwestern's bid 
for a sweep of the tournament by 
defeating the "B" team in the 
finals of the "B" tournament by 
15-4, 15-12. Southwestern was the 
"B" division defending champion. 
Betty Faught, captain, guided the 
"B" team to the finals. Other mem- 
bers of the team were Dianne 
Laurence, Fay Belgard, Babs 
Morgan, Sharlett Burgess, Johnnie 

Demeters Slate 
Turkey Shoot 

The annual Demeter Turkey 
Shoot will be held Wed., Nov. 18th 
at the Northwestern Dairy Barn 
from 12 to 5:30 p.m. There are ten 
turkeys to be given away this year 
as prizes. 

Nine turkeys will be given to the 
nine best shots of the day. One 
turkey is for women shooers only. 
The tenth turkey is for a drawing 
between the losers. 

Advance tickets are selling for 
3 shots for $1 until the day of the 
shoot when the price will be 50c 
per shot. Tickets may be obtained 
from any Demeter member. 

Guns will be furnished or you 
may bring your own. Only gauges 
12 to 410 are to be used. Ammuni- 
tion can be bought for 10c per 
shell. Shot size is limited to 6-8. 



Keglon and Liz Heitman. Several 
of the top "B" division teams were 
Union College, Missippi State 
College for Women, and Siena 
College. 

The "B" team played excellent 
volley ball. They managed to win a 
second place trophy. 



Intramural Play 
Now At Full Speed 

The intramural schedule is going 
full blast now. In football, League 
One has already finished their sea- 
son. The winner was the Knight 
Kats who finished with a 6-0-1 re- 
cord. They were followed closely 
by Brickshack. They had a record 
of 6-1-0. The final standings were: 
W L T 
Knight Kats 6 1 

Brickshack 6 10 

Packers 4 12 

Kappa Alpha 4 3 

Sigma Tau Gamma 2 3 2 
Pi Kappa Phi 2 4 1 

Standings in league number 2 as 
of November 9: 

W L T 
Piney Wood Rooters 4 11 
Dees 4 11 

Coonies 4 2 

Hustlers 4 2 

Linebusters 3 3 

B-Frame 2 3 1 

A-Frame 15 

Semi-Holes 5 1 

Those players interested in intra- 
mural ping-pong should check the 
league chart posted on the Student 
Center bulletin board or at the 
intramural office to see who they 
play. The deadline for league play- 
offs is November 23. 

For those who are interested in 
intramural bowling, volleyball, and 
cross-country, bowling will take 
place November 17 and 19, at 4:30 
p.m. at the Pecan Lanes Bowling 
Alley. Intramural volleyball will 
be played in the mens gym Nov- 
ember 18 and November 23 at 6:30 
p.m. The cross-country will be held 
November 19 at 4:30 p.m. The 
deadline for entries is November 
16 at 4:30 p.m. 




Dick Reding 



Burlitz, Reding 
Win Stagg Award 

Winners of the Alonzo Stagg 
Award for their action displayed 
in the McNeese game last Saturday 
were another pair of ends. They 
are Dick Reding and Richard Ber- 
litz, both of Bossier City. 

The honor roll was cut down 
considerably this week as only 
eight players were listed. There 
were no players to make the of- 
fensive honor roll. Those listed on 
the defensive list were Hubert 
Adams, Mike Creel, Fred Fulton, 
Allen Plummer, Richard Berlitz, 
Claude Patrick, Al Dodd, and Gary 
Schouest. 



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Demons Host Southwestern Bulldogs 
In Homecoming Day Attraction 



The NSC Demons try to keep 
their hopes alive for a first divi- 
sion finish in the Gulf States Con- 
ference as they play host to the 
Southwestern Bulldogs here Sat- 
urday afternoon. It will be a home- 
coming affair for the Demons with 
kickoff time slated for 2:00 p.m. 

Northwestern will be trying to 
regain their winning form that they 
displayed at the beginning of the 
year. They have dropped their last 
two outings, the latest a 12-10 ver- 
dict at the hands of the McNeese 
Cowboys, and have won only one 
of their last four. Their record cur- 
rently stands at 4-3 overall and 1-2 
in the GSC. This is compared to a 
4-2 overall record for Southwestern 
and a 1-1 conference slate. 

The series between the two sc- 
hools is one of the oldest in the 
state as it dates back to 1909. It is 
also an evenly matched series as 
the Bulldogs have been able to win 
27 while the Demons have won 25. 
There has been three ties. 

In last years game, Northwest- 
ern's running game moved the ball 
well but the passing game failed as 
the Lafayette crew outlasted NSC 
for the victory. The Demons were 
in the game until the last quarter 
as they moved the ball on the gro- 
und, until one of several pass in- 
terceptions halted the drive. The 
Demons were able to pick up 231 
yards rushing and 71 yards via the 
airways compared to Southwest- 
ern's 209 yards rushing and 44 
yards passing. The final score was 



USL 19. NSC 13. 

The Demon's injured list still 
contains some key players. James 
Aymond, Corwyn Aldredge, and 
Lawrence Nugent are doubtful 
on whether they will be able to 
start. 

Northwestern has shown that 
they have one of the most explo- 
sive offenses in the nation. They 
have picked up a total of 1398 
yards rushing and 989 yards pass- 
ing in seven games and are averag- 
ing 341 yards per ball game. They 
have also scored 168 points for an 
average of 24 points per game. 
Probable starting lineup: 

NORTHWESTERN 

LE Hubert Adams (200) 

LT Ross Gwinn (252) 

LG Grover Colvin (190) 

C Fred Fulton (207) 

RG Al Moreau (205) 

RT Charles Ragus (263) 

RE Dick Reding (201) 

QB Don Beasley (175) 

LH Ed Horton (187) 

RH Gary Pittman (186) 

FB Bobby Parker (200) 

SOUTHWESTERN 
LE Kent Finley (205) 
LT Charles Fuselier (218) 
LG Mike Patin (210) 
C Terry Fernandez (220) 
RG Brad Hamilton (210) 
RT Frank Cicatiello (222) 
RE Jim McNutt (190) 
QB Bill Bayard (160) 
LH Gerald Landry (175) 
RH Lonny Price (196) 
FB Tommy Hayes (182) 



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Page 6 



ThE CURRENT SAiJCE 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1964 




Nursing Officers 

Assuming duties as newly elected officers of the Louisiana 
Association of Student Nurses are these students on the 
Shreveport campus of the Northwestern School of Nurs- 
ing. They are (left to right) Jeanette Waddle, president; 
Sue Elliott, first vice president; and Julia Turner, corres- 
ponding secretary. 



PASSING IN REVIEW 




Shreveport Nurses 
Dominate Election 
At LASN Gathering 

At the annual convention of the 
Louisiana Association of Student 
Nurses held at the Hotel Bentley 
in Alexandria, Nov. 3-5, several 
NSC nursing students were elected 
to state offices. Assuming duties 
as newly elected officers are: 
Jeanette Waddle, president; Sue 
Elliot, first vice-president; Julie 
Turner, corresponding secretary. 

The NSC members won second 
place in the annual talent show, 
and also second place among the 
student exhibits. Arlene Rolling 
was named Miss Congeniality in 
the contest to name Miss Student 
Nurse of Louisiana. 

The Louisiana Association of 
Student Nurses is an association of 
all students enrolled in schools of 
nursing in Louisiana, and the state 
association is a chapter of the Na- 
tional Association of Student Nur- 
ses. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
SERVICES 
Old Lemee House 
Jefferson St. 
Every Sunday 11:00 A.M. 
All are wel 



Robinson Attends 
IA Conference 

Walter J. Robinson, chairman of 
the Northwestern Department of 
Industrial Education, is attending 
the 51st meeting of the Mississippi 
Valley Industrial Arts Conference 
in St. Louis, Missouri. 

He will deliver a speech on the 
topic: "Should We Develop A 
Standard Or National Curriculum 
For Industrial Arts On the Junior 
High School Level?" 



Alpha Sigs Plan 
Birthday Party 

This week has been very busy 
for both the Alpha Sigs and TKE's 
as we have been working on our 
homecoming float. We thank the 
TKE's for their help and coopera- 
tion on this project. 

Not only have we been busy 
with float, but we have also been 
making plans for our ASA birth- 
day party. Each active and pledge 
is to bring a present for the soro- 
rity house at the party at the party 
after the dance Saturday night. We 
will have a slumber party along 
with the birthday party. The Beta 
Zeta Chapter of Alpha Sigma Al- 
pha at Southwestern has been in- 
vited to the game and the party. 
Sunday afternoon we are having 
our Founder's Day ceremony. 

The Alpha Sigs have been sell- 
ing doughnuts in the dormitories 
every night about eight o'clock. 
They are from Southern Maid and 
are guaranteed to be fresh. Look 
for an Alpha Sig in your dorm, 
and put your order in now. 

AWS Given Talk 
About Cosmetics 

The Associated Women Students 
of Northwestern held their monthly 
meeting in the Varnado drawing 
room Monday, November 9. A 
brief business meeting was con- 
ducted by Kate Thibodeaux, the 
A.W.S. president, followed by a 
brief discussion of Homecoming 
and Christmas at Home. 

The program for the evening was 
a cosmetics demonstration by Mrs. 
Margarite Johnekin of Merle Nor- 
man Studios. The results of the 
bulleting board contests were then 
announced and are as follows: 
October - - 1st Audubon Hall; 2nd 
Louisiana Hall; 3rd Agnes Morris. 
November - - 1st Caddo Hall; 2nd 
Louisiana Hall; 3rd Varnado. 



This column is dedicated to the 
members of the Reserve Officers 
Training Corps at Northwestern, 
with the primary function of 
familiarizing the student body 
with the activities and achieve- 
ments of the Corps. 

Through the help of the staff 
and military advisors, I will strive 
to make this the best column of 
its type in the state. 

The Cadet of the week will be 
recognized along with the Black 
Knights, and the Men's and Wo- 
men's Rifle Teams. 

The Black Knights, NSC's ROTC 
Drill Team will perform in home- 
coming cermonies tomorrow. The 
team is scheduled to march in the 
annual parade through the city at 
10:00 a.m. tomorrow and again in 
the pre-game ceremonies at 1:45 
in the afternoon. 

Cadet Lt. Col. M. J. Gaspard, 
Knights Commander, said, "the 
team has worked very hard these 
last two weeks so that they can 
give returning alumni, parents, 
and students a show that they can 
enjoy." 

Many students got a preview of 
the team in the Tech game parade 
and pre - game ceremonies i n 
Shreveport last month. Since that 
time the team has been preparing 
its 5 minute routine for the home- 
coming fans. 

The Men's Rifle Team went up 
against McNeese this past Satur- 
day, and almost walked away with 
a victory. The final score was: 
McNeese 1201 to NSC'sll85. Paul 
Jeansonne from Alexandria, turn- 
ed in a real fine performance for 



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the team; Paul was the high shoot- 
er of the match with a 252x300. 
The Men's Rifle Team will fire 
sometime next month at Ft. Polk. 

Chris Young took CADET OF 
THE WEEK with a perfect score 
of 100! The cadets are judged on 
appearance, bearing, performance, 
etc. This is the first time that any 
cadet has achieved a perfect score 




S 1 

Chris Young 



in all categories. Chris is a 2-1, 
majoring in Wildlife Management 
and hails from Metairie. Corporal 
Young is assistant squad leader 
in "C" Company and he is also 
Co-Captain of the Rifle Team. To 
Cadet Corporal Young goes a hear- 
ty congratulations on a job well 
done. 




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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 



Northwestern Student Teachers Practicing In Shreveport 




Marjorie Kelly 



Becky Alphin 



Mack Stephan 




Student Teachers 



NSC Teachers In Caddo 
First Time In History 



For the first time in the history 
of the Education Department, 
Northwestern education majors are 
student teaching in Shreveport. 
There are 11 students teaching in 
four different schools. 

Mack Strahan is teaching in Mr. 
David's sixth grade in Southern 
Hills Elementary. Marjorie Kelley 
and Andrea Liesenbea are teaching 
Miss Cryer's first grade in Forest 
Hills Elementary. Theresa Clem- 
ents and Mrs. Virginia Curtis are 
teaching Mr. Evan's sixth grade 
also in Forest Hills Elementary.. 
Becky Alphin and Jimmy Barr are 
teaching the sixth grade at South- 
ern Hills under Mr. Ward. 

In the Summer Grove Elemen- 
tary Yvonne Belgard and Mrs. Pen- 
ny Hoffpauir are teaching in Mrs. 
Gingles second grade. Douglas 
Beach and Valda Varry are teach- 
ing the fifth grade under the 



supervision of Mrs. Jinks. 

All the student teachers have 
commented that the thing that 
they like most about teaching in 
Shreveport was the fact that they 
were treated by the students and 
faculty as another teacher, not as 
a student. Many said that they 
liked the opportunity to work in a 
system where there were no ob- 
servers. 

The student teachers participate 
in faculty meetings and work with 
individual children. They remain 
with the children all day. 

While teaching, the 11 take one 
three hour course, Education 421, 
under Dr. Mary Jo Harris who 
spends two days of each week in 
Shreveport supervising her stu- 
dents. 

Those doing their practice teach- 
ing in Shreveport live at home or 
in rented apartments. 




Virginia Curtis 



Theresa Clements 



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113 Second St. 




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Well conditioned shoes ore an im- 
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SHOE REPAIRS 
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ALL KINDS 

Special 
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Western Style Belts & Wallets 
Moccasins 
Polishes - Laces - Dyes 

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BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 



Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1964 



LETTERS 
To The 
EDITOR 



Students Lambaste 
Attendance Rules 

Editor, Current Sauce: 

Sometime between the end of 
the spring semester 1964 and the 
fall semester 1964, a new set of 
class attendance regulations were 
put into effect. Most of us students 
were very much against the rules 
from the very beginning. But, we 
were allowed no voice what-so-ever 
in the passing of these rules. Many 
students attempted to gain entran- 
ce to the meeting last spring (that 
was to decide on the rules) to 
voice their opinion, but they were 
impelled to leave and told that 
there was too much misunderstand- 
ing on the part of the student; 
"that they were really for the stu- 
dent's benefit," and that "they 
would not be passed until next fall 
when the misunderstanding could 
be cleared up." 

So behind our backs, when the 
students had no chance to voice 
legitimate opinion, the rules were 
adopted. They were, much against 
our will, shoved down our throats 
for us to either comply with or ac- 
cept the consequences. 

But, the salt in our wounds, the 
twist of the knife in our backs, is 
the enforcer of those rules; the 
"judge," "jury," and "prosecutor;" 
that indelible thorn in every stu- 
dent's side, the Attendance Officer. 
Interpreting each rule to the let- 
ter, and even making a few, ap- 
parently no exceptions are made 
for anyone for any reason. And 
adding insult to injury, the atti- 
tude of the Attendance Officer is 
frankly dispicable. In the interest 
of fiar-play, it is our desire that we 
students be given a chance to de- 
cide on these regulations. 

Morris E. Stephens-Pre-Law 
Elizabeth Stephens-Education 
James Long-History 
Edgar Bryon-English 
Robert Stockman-Math 
Charlotte Anderson-English 
Jane Upton-Social Welfare 
Grover Robertson-English 
Judy Gaspard-Physical Edu. 
Norma Butler-Social Welfare 
Michael Pearce-Math 
Calvin Campbell-Math 
Jimmie Hilborn-French Edu. 
David Permente-Pre-Med. 
Ann Boyd-Chemistry 
L. McCormick 
Karen Mensing 
Kaye Frith-Med. Technology 
Victor Hoye-Psychology 
Thomas Rowan-English Edu. 
Carey Fairbanks-Zoology 
Michael Armstrong-French 
Dwayne Dixon-Zoology 
Ray Mobley-Math 
Doug Attaway-Math 
Gloria Deville-Social Welfare 
Yvonne Boudreaux-Sociology 
Paul Riggs-Math 
Whitney Granger-Pre.-Med. 
Thomas Bradley-Wildlife Man. 
Loyce Ray-Sociology 
Don Moore-English Edu. 
Larry Arthur-Microbiology 
Alice Arthur-Microbiology 
William Long-Math 



COMMUNITY 
CLEANERS 

Specialists In Nations 
Finest Dry Cleaning 

Professional Shirt 
Laundry 

Phone 2229 
103 Second Street 



Student Council 
Minutes 

November 9, 1964 

The regular meeting of the NSC 
student council was held at 6 p.m. 
in Bullard Hall. The meeting was 
called to order by President Steve 
Blount. The roll was called, and 
the minutes of the previous meet- 
ing were read. 

It was announced that any or- 
ganization wanting to enter a 
float in the Homecoming parade 
should contact Mr. Ralph Fell as 
soon as possible. Blount read the 
list of activities for Saturday, Nov- 
ember 14. 

Calbert Marcantel asked if the 
gym floor could be covered for the 
dance Saturday. It was reported 
that the floor might be covered; 
however, no one would be allowed 
to dance on it. Bobby Charles and 
the Continentals will play for the 
dance. 

Nick DeJean raised the question 
as to whether NSC students would 
be admitted to the performance of 
the Four Seasons on their I.D. 
cards. Blount reported that they 
would. 

Bettie Moore moved that a cof- 
fee be given by the student council 
prior to the performance of the 
Four Seasons for the department 
heads and deans. Second by Patsy 
Gaspard. Motion passed. 

The following people will work 
in the box office on Monday to sell 
tickets for the performance of the 
Four Seasons: 

4- 5 p.m. Jim Leabo 

5- 6 p.m. Stanley Branton 

6- 7 p.m. Nick DeJean 

7- 8 p.m. Joe Traigle & Jim Leabo 
Patsy Gaspard, Jean Walker, and 

J. O. Charrier will conduct a ticket 
sale in Coushatta Friday, Novem- 
ber 13. 

Stan Branton, Milton Rhea, and 
Bettie Moore will help decorate 
the stage for the performance of 
the Four Seasons. 

Rhea suggested that the council 
advertise that they are sponsoring 
the performance of the Four Sea- 
sons. 

Calbert Marcantel thanked the 
council members for their coope- 
ration at the dance last week. The 
following will help this week: 
Butch Wiggins, Alix Harris, Roy 
Corley, Bettie Moore, and Jean 
Walker. The Rhythm Dukes will 
play and there will be a 25c ad- 
mission charge. 

Blount introduced Dean Moore 



CHIEF DRIVE-IN 



Friday & Saturday 



Luke Halpin 
"FLIPPER'S NEW 
ADVENTURE" 
Plus 

Cary Grant 
Audrey Hepburn 

"CHARADE" 

Both In Color 



Sun.-Mon.-Tues. 



Alfred Hitchcock's 

"AAARNIE" 

Sean Connery 
In Color 



Wednesday-Thursday 
"BUCK NITES" 



Frank Sinatra 
Dean Martin 

'FOUR FOR TEXAS" 

Plus 

Clark Gable 

'BAND OF ANGELS' 
Both In Color 




DR. PAUL J. THOMPSOM, 
assistant professor of micro- 
biology, will attend the South- 
Central Branch Meeting of the 
American Society for Micro- 
biology. The meeting will take 
place at Loyola University in 
New Orleans on November 13 
and 14. 

Selected as the first "TKE 
Sweetheart of the Month" was 
Pam Booth, freshman from 
Jonesville and Block High 
School. She was presented 
with a bouquet of red carna- 
tions, the fraternity flower, 
and was introduced to the 
members at a recent TKE 
meeting. 



who is a member of the Southern 
Association Evaluation Committee. 
Dean Moore discussed campus pro- 
blems with the council. 

There being no further business, 
Pat Holley moved that the meeting 
be adjourned. Second by Scotty 
Maxwell. Meeting adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Carolyn Thomas 
Secretary 



CANE THEATRE 

Natchitoches, La. Phone 2922 



Friday & Saturday 



Gymnastic Team Plans Competition 




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— Plus— 

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ANTHONY QUINN 

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FROM 

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YDUNGBLOOD 
HAWKE 

JAMtS FRANCISCUS • SUZANNE PLESHETTE 1 
GENEVIEVE PAGE ..SKSSV. I 

PRESENTED Bt 1YAPNEK EROS ', 



Wednesday — Thursday 




PAN INCREDIBLE LOVE! 

COLUMBIA PICTURES pressnS 




An improved Northwestern gym- 
nastic team plans an ambitious 
competitive schedule to begin in 
December, according to Coach Fred 
Martinez. 

A predominently freshman squad 
of 11 members is working daily 
for dual meets with LSU, North- 
east, and other Louisiana teams. 
The Demons expect to vie against 
Southwestern, Southeastern, and 
Nicholls, although these teams may 
not be ready for dual meets. All 
Louisiana schools competing in 
gymnastics, except LSU, are coach- 
ed by Northwestern graduates. 

In addition to dual collegiate 
meets, the gymnasts are expected 
to compete in regional AAU meets 
and in special programs such as 
the Southwest Invitational at La- 
fayette and the Louisiana State 
Collegiate Championships at Mon- 
roe, in addition to hosting their 
own Mid-South Championships 
here. 

Teams invited to the Mid-South 
meet, according to Martinez, are 
LSU, Northeast, Southwestern, 
Southeastern, Nicholls, the Univer- 
sity of Texas, Memphis State Uni- 
versity, the University of Tennes- 
see, Georgia Southern University, 
the University of Kansas, Mobile 
State College, and the University 
of Southern Illinois. 

The gymnasts will perform at 
the annual Louisiana Teachers 
Association meeting in Shreveport. 
A statewide gymnastic clinic for 



students at all levels will be con- 
ducted in the Men's Gymnasium 
Dec. 14, to be followed in the even- 
ing by the annual home show in 
the Fine Arts Auditorium. Gym- 
nasts will also perform at the 
Homecoming program and on the 
Christmas Festival program. 

Members of the varsity squad are 
Richard Loyd, Joe Williamson, Wes 
McVay, Jack Crawford, Belle Chas- 
se, David Bedard, Bob Harmann, 
Thomas Boone, Larry Star, and Ben 
Pratt. Team manager is Jimmy 
Barnadge. 



AMS Council 
Met Nov. 5 

The Northwestern Associated 
Men Students executive council 
held its regular meeting November 
5. Reports showed that rapid pro- 
gress is being made on the revi- 
sion of the present fallout protec- 
tion pamphlet. 

Strategic points have been se- 
lected for thee placement of the 
trash barrels with the location de- 
pending upon the number of bar- 
rels obtainable. 

An honor banner will be pre- 
sented every semester to the men's 
dormitory with the highest grade 
point average for the previous 
semester. Any dormitory having 
this honor for four consecutive se- 
mesters or two years will be pre- 
sented a permanent plaque. 



DON THEATRE 



NOW SHOWING THROUGH SATURDAY 



FEATURE TIMES 

FRIDAY — One Performance Only Starting 
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SATURDAY— Three Performances 1:15—4:30—7:45 



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COLUMBIA PICTURES msns 

FAILSAFE 



A MAX E. YOUNGSTEIN- 
SIDNEY LUMETtrotoon 



Starring: Dan O'Herlihy — Henry Fonda 
WHAT DOES FAIL SAFE MEAN? 
It Is The Point Of No Return When 
No Man Can Stop The Bomb-Drop. 



COMING SOON ATTRACTIONS 
"I'D RATHER BE RICH" 
"BEACH PARTY" 
"BECKET" 




urrent 




auce 



VOL. LI— No. 11 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1964 



Mr., Miss NSC Election Slated For Tuesday 



Candidates For Miss NSC 



Candidates For Mr. NSC 




Joanne Salter 



In an all-College election Tues- 
day, from 8 a. m. to 7 p. m., Mr. 
and Miss NSC will be chosen. The 
following students were nominat- 
ed by the dormitories on the basis 
of scholarship, leadership, charac- 
ter, integrity, loyalty, participa- 
tion in activities, and service to 
Northwestern. The election will be 
held in the student center. 

Pat, a math major from Metarie, 
was chosen as the Lady of the 
Bracelet for 1961-62, and elected 
to the State Fair Court for 1962- 
63. During 1963-64 she was editor 
of the Potpourri, and chosen as 
Most Ambitious on the Potpourri 
Court. Patricia is an active mem- 
ber of Sigma Sigma Sigma. 

A primary education major from 
Minden, Barbara is serving as Pur- 



Kate Thibodeaux 



pie jacket president, senior class 
secretary, senior counselor, BSU 
Hostess, a member of SLTA, Nep- 
tune Club, and Kappa Delta Pi. 
She was elected as both outstand- 
ing freshman and upperclassman 
by the AWS, and chosen as a soph- 
omore counselor. She served as 
president of the organization for 
the year 1963-64, and as recording 
secretary the previous year. Bar- 
bara was freshman class secretary 
and Student Council associate. 

Irby is a home economics major 
from Effie. A member of the Pur- 
ple Jackets, she was both a senior 
and a sophomore counselor. She 
is vice-president of the AWS, and 
the Euthenics Club, and chairman 
of the Judiciary Board. Irby is a 
member of Kappa Delta Pi, Phi 



Kappa Phi, and Nu Sigma Chi. 

Also a home economics major, 
Joanne is from Zwolle. She has 
served as both a senior and a soph- 
omore counselor, and as the junior 
representative of the Judiciary 
Board. President of SLTA, she is 
a dormitory officer, a member of 
the Purple Jackets, Kappa Delta 
Pi, and the BSU. 

A health and physical education 
major from Mermentau, Kate is 
currently president of the PEM 
Club and the AWS. A member of 
the Purple Jackets, Kate was a 
sophomore counselor and a prev- 
ious officer of the AWS. 

Majoring in home economics, 
Jean is a resident of Shreveport. 
She is a member of the Purple 
Jackets, Kappa Delta Pi, and 



Phillips 



SLTA. Jean, who was a sophomore 
counselor, is a state officer of the 
Euthenics Club. She has held the 
offices of president and secretary 
of the local club. Corresponding 
secretary of Delta Zeta, Jean is al- 
so vice-president of women on the 
Student Council. 

Senior class president Jimmy 
Berry is an upper elementary edu- 
cation major from Winnfield. He 
was president of the freshman 
class. Jimmy is an officer of Blue 
Key, a local and state officer of 
SLTA, and a member of the Stu- 
dent Council. 

An accounting major from Shon- 
galoo, Steve is president of the stu- 
dent body. He served as president 
of the junior class, and is a mem- 



John Weffenstette 



ber of the Student Council. Busi- 
ness manager of the Potpourri, 
Steve is Blue Key vice-president. 
He has previously served as Blue 
Key reporter. He is a member of 
Pi Omega Pi and the Alumni 
Board of Directors. 

BSU president Bill Phillips is an 
accounting major from Boyce. He 
is corresponding secretary of Blue 
Key, and a member of Pi Omega 
Pi. 

An electronics major from Nat- 
chitoches, John is editor of the Pot- 
pourri. He was associate editor of 
the 1964 Potpourri. He is an active 
member of Sigma Tau Gamma, 
ROTC, and was treasurer of Alpha 
Phi Gamma. John is also a mem- 
ber of AUSA. 



Holidays Will Begin 
Wednesday Noon 

Thanksgiving Holidays will be- 
gin at Northwestern at noon Wed- 
nesday, Nov. 25, and extend to 8 
a. m. Monday, Nov. 30, according 
to an announcement by S. W. Nel- 
ken, dean of administration. 

The above hours will be obser- 
ved by all offices. However, dor- 
mitories and the Infirmary will 
close at 2 p.m. Wednesday and re- 
open at 1 p. m. Sunday. The dining 
halls and Student Center cafe will 
close following the noon meal on 
Wednesday with dining halls re- 
opening for the evening meals Sun- 
day. Student Center cafe will re- 
open at 7 a. m. Monday. 

The Northwestern switchboard 
will be closed from 2 p. m. Wed- 
nesday until Sunday afternoon at 
t The NSC Power Plant will close 
down at 5 p. m. Wednesday, with 
the City of Natchitoches supplying 
power, until it reopens at 1 p. m. 
Sunday. 



Demeters Hold 
Turkey Shoot 

The Northwestern Demeter Agri- 
cultural Fraternity held its annual 
Turkey Shoot Wednesday after- 
noon. Winners of turkeys were, 
in order, Keeth Wright, Rhese Col- 
lins, Oscar Scott, Vester Wilker- 
son, Eugene Edmonds, Mrs. Addie 
Huckabay, Mrs. McKneely, and 
Preston Stedman. 



Garth To Serve 
On NSF Panel 

Dr. Richard E. Garth, associate 
professor of biology at Northwest- 
ern State College, has been invited 
to serve on an evaluation panel for 
the National Science Foundation 
in San Francisco, December 3 and 
4. 

The panel will evaluate applica- 
tion proposals for grants submit- 
ted to the undergraduate research 
participation program of NSF. 

Dr. Garth served on the staff of 
NSF last year while on a leave of 
absence from NSC. 



PRATHER COLISEUM 



NSC Coliseum Named For Prather; 
Education Board Makes Selection 



The coliseum at Northwestern, 
completed last spring, will be 
named in honor of the late H. L. 
Prather, former president of NSC, 
as well as former football and 
basketball coach, professor of 
government, and dean of men. 

The State Board of Education 
decided unamiously at a meeting 
in Baton Rouge Saturday, to name 
the structure in honor of Coach 
Prather. A group of alumni, com- 
posed chiefly of athletes who 
were members of Prather's teams, 
suggested naming the Coliseum 
after him because of his 38 years 
service as basketball coach at 
Northwestern. He was coach of all 
NSC sports for 20 years without 
an assistant before being named 
athletic director and dean of men. 

Coach Prather was employed by 
Northwestern (then Louisiana 
State Normal), in 1913 and remain- 
ed here until 1954. While at NSC 
he helped organize the old LIAA 
(Louisiana State Intercollegiate 



Athletic Association). Records for 
his entire 38 years as coach are 
not available, but records for 30 
years report 388 victories and 143 
defeats. He had several conference 
championship teams and reached 
the NAIA playoff on one occasion. 

Prather was named president of 
Northwestern on Oct. 24, 1950 and 
remained in that position until 
May 15, 1954 when he retired. He 
was also selected for membership 
in the Helms Foundation Ail- 
American Hall of Fame for Bask- 
etball, the highest honor that can 
be bestowed on a basketball coach. 
The NSC Alumni Association hon- 
ored him in 1963 by naming him 
an honorary member homecoming 
day. 

The drive to name the coliseum 
after Coach Prather was headed 
by D. H. Whittington of Natchito- 
ches, a member of several of his 
teams, and president of the Gradu- 
ate "N" Club. 



Potpourri Slates 
Society Pictures 

All fraternity and sorority mem- 
bers who failed to have theeir pic- 
tures taken for the Potpourri at 
the previously announced time may 
take them this afternoon, (Friday). 

Pictures will be taken at Uhr- 
bach's Studio in Broadmoor Shop- 
ping Center between the hours of 
1-5 p.m. today. 

You are again reminded that 
this will be the final opportunity 
for fraternity and sorority pic- 
tures to be made. 



BIENVENU ON PROGRAM 

Dr. Rene J. Bienvenu, professor 
and head of the Department of 
Microbiology at Northwestern will 
appear on the program of the 17th 
annual meeting of the Brucellosis 
Conference in Chicago, Sunday, 
Nov. 29. 

Dr. Bienvenu is a member of the 
executive committee of the organ- 
ization and is chairman of the mec- 
hanisms of infection division. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1964 



KA Stars 




Kappa Alpha Fraternity salutes these three members of 
the fraternity and the Demon football team. They have 
proven to be an intricate part of the success of the Demons 
so far this year. They are: (left to right) Gary Pittman, 
Kenny Guillot and Allen Plummer. 



KA Salutes Football Brothers 



Although the football game was 
not won by the Demons, the NSC 
chapter of Kappa Alpha wishes to 
congratulate the entire team and 
especially brothers Gary Pittman, 
Kenny Guillot, and Allen Pummer 
for the fine effort they made. 

The homecoming activities for 
KA members began Friday even- 
ing with the pledge class and 
active members working hand-in- 
hand to prepare the house and St. 
Mary's auditorium for the next 
day's activities. The Open House 
held Saturday was a welcome op- 
portunity for members, alumni, 
parents and guests to meet and 
enjoy the cokes, coffee and dough- 
nuts which were available for 
their pleasure. 

The Homecoming dance began 
at 7:30 p.m. with music supplied 
by the "Uniques." Midway through 
the dance, KA's had a surprise 
visit from Mr. Bobby Chares who 
found time during the intermiss- 
ion at the college dance to come 
over and sing some songs for 
them. Kappa Alpha's extend their 
most sincere thanks to Bobby, the 
administrators of St. Mary's High 
School, the chaperons and, of 
course, to the social leommittee 
for making this weekend, and 
particularly this dance, the best 
this semester. 

The Children's Christmas Party 
and Christmas Ligjitjs Festival 

BSU To Present 
Entertainment 

A fellowship will be held at the 
BSU center following the NSC 
football game Saturday. The enter- 
tainment will be provided by Joe 
Santo, Jr., minister of music at the 
Emmanuel Baptist Church of Alex- 
andria. Mr. Santo will bring with 
him a trumpet trio and a pianist 
who will help him entertain. All 
NSC students are cordially invited. 

Dr. Glen E. Bryant, pastor of the 
Emmanuel Baptist Church of Alex- 
andria, will be the speaker for the 
BSU Thanksgiving service to be 
held November 24 at 6:30 a. m. at 
the BSU center. Dr. Bryant is the 
originator of the television pro- 
gram, "Life At Its Best," which is 
on KALB every Saturday. The Nor- 
thwestern BSU choir will present 
the special music, and a breakfast 
will follow the service. All NSC 
students are cordially invited. 



by the 
Thanks- 




THE FINEST, MOST 
SATISFYING MEALS 
ARE FOUND AT 

Le Rendezvous 

113 Second St. 



are still being planned 
chapter along with the 
giving dance which is to be held 
in Shreveport November 28 at the 
Forty and Eight Club beginning 
at 9 p.m. Featured will be "Good 
Rockin Luke and the Cassanovas". 

Congratulations are in order for 
Miss Susie Sams and brother Mike 
Weego on the announcement of 
their engagement this past week- 
end. We wish them the best of 
luck always. 



Sigma Kappa Float 
Places Second 

The Sigma Kappa sorority start- 
ed the homecoming weekend right 
by placing second with their float. 
The girls would like to express 
their thanks to Buddy Famous, 
David Brister, and others who 
worked so hard to help make the 
float a success. 

Bringing homecoming activities 
to a close was a party the actives 
gave for the pledges Saturday 
night. The pledges discovered the 
the names of their secret "big 
sisters." All the pledges were 
given a red and white stripped 
dorm shirt and were served re- 
freshments of tuna fish sand- 
wiches, potato chips and cokes. 



Rings Lost 

Anne Hamer lost two rings in 
Warren Easton. They were a St. 
Mary's High Class ring with the 
initials A. E. H. and a pearl ring. 
If you have any information about 
these rings, please call 6185. 




Making preparations for the Purple Jacket Revue to be 
presented Tuesday night are the officers of the honor 
society. They are: left to right, Joanne Salter, treasurer; 
Lucy Hart, secretary, Carolyn Ballue, vice-president; and 
Barbara Martin, president. 

Purple Jacket Revue Scheduled 



Come along with the Purple Jac- 
kets as they present this year's re- 
vue, "Stairway to the Stars." It 
will be held November 24 in the 
Fine Arts Auditorium at 7:00 p. m. 
For only 50c per person, everyone 
will be able to see real talent in 
action. The talent will be present- 
ed by our own Northwestern stu- 
dents. 

Beginning the program, will be 
Miss Thelle Levee singing the 
theme song, "Stairway to the 



Stars." Following the song, Mr. 
Eddie Huey, the Master of Cere- 
monies, will introduce the Purple 
Jackets. 

Then begins the talent acts. 
These will include vocal and inst- 
rumental numbers, ballet and tap 
dancing, a Dixieland band, the 
gymnastic team, a comedy act, and 
many more entertaining features. 

For a full evening of enjoyment, 
plan to come to the Purple Jacket 
Revue. 



European Study 
Grants Available 

Florence, Madrid, Barcelona, 
Cologne and other world-famous 
European cities will become the 
winter, spring and summer camp- 
uses for American college students 
participating in a Michigan State 
University program of language 
study abroad. 

In cooperation with the Stiftung 
fur Europaische Sprach-und Bil- 
dungszentren, the MSU Continuing 
Education Service is offering inten- 
sive programs in French, at Lau- 
sanne and Neuchatel, Switzerland; 
in Spanish, at Barcelona and Mad- 
rid, Spain; in German, at Cologne, 
Germany; and in Italian, at Flor- 
ence, Italy. 

Applications for winter and sp- 
ring quarter programs are now be- 
ing accepted. Details for the sum- 
mer program will be available 
shortly. Interested students are en- 
couraged to obtain application 
forms as soon as possible. 

In addition to classes in conver- 
sation, composition, grammar and 
reading, participants will visit 
points of historic and geographic 
interest which become the topics 
of lectures and seminar-type dis- 
cussions covering cultural, politi- 
cal, social and economic institu- 
tions of the country in which they 
reside. 

To promote use of the foreign 
language and provide them with 
opportunities to better understand 
their European contemporaries, 
American participants will attend 




Selected as the first "TKE 
Sweetheart of the Month" was 
Pam Booth, freshman from 
Jonesville and Block High 
School. She was presented 
with a bouquet of red carna- 
tions, the fraternity flower, 
and was introduced to the 
members at a recent TKE 
meeting. 

classes and share living accomo- 
dations with students from Ger- 
many, France, Italy, Denmark, 
Sweden and Great Britain. 

Additional information about the 
winter, spring and summer pro- 
grams may be obtained by writing 
AMLEC, 12 Kellogg Center, Mich- 
igan State University, East Lan- 
sing, Mich. 



SHOP SANDEFUR JEWELERS 

WHERE YOU WILL FIND A LARGE SELECTION OF 

Jewelery and Novelties 

Entire Stock Reduced ! ! 

NSC Pennants 49c each 

AND 

YOUR BUSINESS IS ALWAYS APPRECIATED 

AT 

SANDEFUR JEWELERS 



St. Denis 



Phone 6390 




REVL0N PROFESSIONAL 
HAIR SPRAY 

$1.50 Value-88c Plus Tax 

This Hair Spray Is 
Perfect For Any Hair Style 




Two Stores To Serve You 



DeBLIEUX' PHARMACY 

BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 
PHONE 4582 



NEW DRUG STORE 

SECOND AND ST. DENIS 
PHONE 2386 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



Editorials 



Entertainment Committee 
Shou!d Make Self-Study 

Last year there was an amendment of the Constitution 
passed to raise the Student Association fee 50c so that "big 
name entertainment" could be brought to campus. In addition 
to this raise in the fee, another 50c was delegated to this fund 
from the class dues and the student loan fund, thus bringing 
the total amount delegated to this committee to $1 per person. 

The argument given for this special committee was that 
the Northwestern-Natchitoches Concert Association was not 
getting the type entertainment that the students wanted. So, 
this group from the Student Council decided that they could 
better satisfy the desires of the students if they had the money. 

So far this year the committee has brought two "big 
name" groups to NSC and it has cost you $4000. The Brandy- 
wine Singers charged $1000 for their appearance and the Four 
Seasons set their price at $3000, in advance. 

The price paid for the Four Seasons was bad enough, but 
after they got here they performed for exactly one hour and 
ten minutes; at a rate in excess of $40 per minute. In addition 
to this, they stipulated many things in their contract which 
could have canceled their entire contract and the students 
would have had to have paid them whether or not they per- 
formed. 

Last year the city of Natchitoches employed Jan Garber 
and his orchestra to play for the 250th Anniversary celebration 
and this group cost just $1750. In addition to this, Southern 
Arkansas State College is having the entire New Orleans Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra perform for them later this year and it is 
only costing $2700. 

If we are going to haye this "big name entertainment," it 
would be wise to be more frugal with the students' money. 

One other singing group, Richard and Jim, is tentatively 
planned to appear at Northwestern later this semester. This 
seems to be a repitition of the same type of entertainment. It 
should be remembered that there are other types of "big name 
entertainment." Every student is requred to pay part of the 
cost of this entertainment; therefore, there should be a wider 
variety of entertainment so that everyone may have an oppor- 
tunity to enjoy the things he likes. After all, if this committee 
was formed not particularly to broaden the student's cultural 
experiences; it should better satisfy the desires of all students. 




LETTERS 
To The 
EDITOR 



Dear Sir: 

Everyone is blaming the football 
team for our losing the homecom- 
ing game. Well, I am not, and I'm 
sure there are other students who 
feel the same way that I do. 

I think this school has no spirit. 
I have never seen such a pitiful 
bunch of supporters in my life. At 
the game Saturday, we were sitting 
on the bleacher side, and I counted 
almost 30 students from USL. 
These 30 students made more rac- 
ket than the thousands of people 
supposedly for NSC. They started 
cheering at the very beginning of 
the game and didn't stop until the 
last second. But I couldn't hear a 
peep from the stadium. The stu- 
dents from NSC started leaving be- 
fore the end of the game, but the 
USL kids, who had a three hour 
drive home, didn't budge. I heard 
several of those students saying 
how bad the school spirit was at 
Northwestern. 

School spirit is a very important 
thing students should have, and I 
believe this school needs some dra- 
stically. 

A USL student told me that for 
the first two USL games no one 
would cheer so someone wrote an 
article in the school paper about 
it, and it did a great deal of good. 

I only hope that maybe a few 
students who read this letter will 
wake up and realize how impor- 
tant this situation is here at NSC. 
It isn't too late because we still 
have one more game this season. 
Let's start acting like NSC Demons 
and support our team! 

Thank you, 

Jackie Long 



PASSING IN REVIEW 




By Ernie Harris 



Everything was fairly quiet 
down at the Armory this week, and 
I thought I would take this oppor- 
tunity to familiarize all of you 
with the honorary component of 
the ROTC. 

I am referring to the women 
sponsors in case you are wonder- 
ing what I am talking about. These 
young women are brought up for 
nomination and are voted on by 
the members of the respective com- 
panies. The sponsors for the com- 
panies are: Jeanie Marlar — Col. — 
Battalion; Nancy Clayton — Capt. — 
Headquarters; Judy Gowland — 
Capt.— "A" Company; Glenda Ab- 
ney— Capt. — "B" Company; Gloria 
Hough— Capt.— "C" Company. They 
are given honorary ranks, and con- 
trary to popular belief, the spon- 
sors are not members of the ROTC. 
They must have a "C" average at 
the time of nomination, and hold 
this average to remain a sponsor. 
Some of their duties are: atten- 
dance of the Thursday drill, morale 
builders, marching with the troops, 
etc. 

The Black Knights really look- 
ed sharp at the Homecoming cere- 
monies Saturday. It was a shame 
that they couldn't have performed 
more than what they were allowed 
to do, it would have really been a 
sight to see. An interesting fact was 
brought to my attention at supper 
that night; that they practice ten 
hours per one minute of perfor- 
mance. The show that all of you 
saw Saturday represented 30 to 40 
hours of hard work! The "throw" 
maneuver won the crowd over im- 
mediately, and they would have 
loved to see more, but not enough 
time was alloted for any more de- 
monstrations. On this particular 
maneuver, they have two inches 
to throw their rifles, and if they 



should miss, someone will be hit 
on the head. Quite a few of the 
men had "battle scars" from this 
maneuver Saturday. The Black 
Knights are one of the few drill 
teams in the nation that have this 
maneuver, and they are all origi- 
nals. The Knights practice on an 
average of three hours a day inclu- 
ding Saturday and Sunday. 

The Men's and Women's Rifle 
Team have some promising pros- 
pects for this year, and you can bet 
your bottom dollar that all of them 
will put forth their best effort for 
the teams they represent in compe- 
tition. 

Congratulations go out to Cadet 
Private John Gendron for being 
chosen CADET OF THE WEEK for 




the Corps. John is a freshman from 
Leesville, majoring in Government 
with a minor in French and Econo- 
mics. Cadet Gendron is presently 
serving with the 1st Platoon of 
"B" Company. 



Phalmerimus And His Passion 



"1 know I've complained a lct waxr-jri root? weze, m now 

THAT 1'AA AE?PUT PEACY TO GWUATE I M WINNING TO LIKE IT." 



By John 
Phalmerinus, The Wheel-Eyed: 
Clubbing man into submission, 
Speaking softly and carrying 
A big stick. 

-Omar Khayam's Fifth 
Grade Rubiyat 

The Cyclopes roamed the earth 
for many years. One of them, Pol- 
yphemus, was visited by Ulysses 
and Aeneas on their journeys 
home after the Trojan War. Still 
another, Phalmerimus, gave man 
one of his favorite means of re- 
creation, although he certainly did 
not intend to do so. Phalmerimus 
was one of the more dense Cyclop- 
es. He evidently thought it his duty 
to wreak havoc and misery upon 
mankind. He walked around the 
earth looking for human beings 
whom he considered fit for sacri- 
fice to himself. Upon finding such 
a hapless soul, the leviathan 
would proceed to sever his head 
from his body by means of a big 
bulky club he always carried. 

One day he came to the country 
around Mount Vesuvius. The mam- 
moth creature happened upon a 
luckless soul who was out hunting 
for food. Even before the hunter 
could turn around, the awkward 
giant was swinging his club. A ter- 
rible crunching sound was heard 
for miles around, and the head 
flew through the air. Phalmerimus 
was very proud of his brute force, 
and he knew that this had been 
one of his better blows. But even 
he was surprised to see the head 
fly far into the horizon and land 
within the rim of the volcanic 
Mount Vesuvius. 

This accomplishment thrilled 
him so greatly that he stayed in 
the surrounding area instead of 
moving on, as he usually did. Nat- 
urally, the people of the region 
were petrified with fear. They 
could not bear the thought of their 
entire race being wiped out by the 
immortal behemoth. When almost 
half of the men of the region had 
died in this most excruciating 
manner, the people met and de- 



Ramsey 

cided to send a messenger to Del- 
phi to consult Apollo's oracle 
there. 

The messenger brought back 
happy news to the demoralized 
remnants of the region. Apollo had 
promised, said the oracle, that the 
region would be freed from Phol- 
merimus if they would erect a 
monument to him five hundred 
yards from the base of Mount Ves- 
uvius. On this monument they 
were to inscribe the word "Thea," 
in honor of the moon. When they 
had completed this task, they pray- 
ed to the gods for assistance. 

The gods heard the prayers. On 
the first night of a full moon after- 
ward, Thea carried Phalmerimus 
away. It seemed she fell in love 
with him, and could not kill him, 
as the gods had commanded. In- 
stead, she took him into the hea- 
vens, and from that day on there 
has been a "man in the moon." 

The people were overjoyed. 
They found the club of Phalmeri- 
mus and encased it within the 
monument. After feasting for 
many days, they went back to their 
normal lives. 

Many years passed. Eventually, 
the story of Phalmerimus was for- 
gotten. Men sometimes wondered 
at the monument with the strange 
club and inscription, but no one 
understood its significance. 

In these days, King Gof was the 
ruler of the region. He was wise 
and prudent, and the people of the 
region thrived. He was also just 
and was loved by all his kingdom. 

One day the King came upon the 
Phalmeriman monument. In his 
day the language was far different 
from what it had ever been before. 
Therefore he pronounced the in- 
scription "tee" instead of "Thea." 
Some accounts say the mispro- 
nunciation was due to a terrible 
lisp with which the king was af- 
flicted. 

At any rate, the good king hit 
upon a marvelous idea. Some say 



the gods put the idea into his head. 
He picked up a club from the 
ground and tried to hit a circular 
rock into the pit of Mount Vesu- 
vius. When he saw that this was 
humanly impossible, he went out 
and dug in the ground a pit into 
which he hit the rock. He painted 
the rock white so that he could fol- 
low it better against the blue of 
the sky and the green of the trees. 

The kind king taught his newly 
formed pleasure to the members 
of his court. They, too, enjoyed 
the pasttime, and they called the 
place around the monument 
"Courts" of course. They built a 
place to store their clubs and 
white rocks and called it a club- 
house. When they found that after 
getting the ball in the hole, they 
had to walk all the way back to the 
tee and start over again, they laid 
out, one after another, a series of 
eighteen holes and tees, one for 
each of the gods of Olympus and 
six for any gods of whom they 
might happen to be ignorant. This 
minimized walking and greatly in- 
creased the capacity of the course. 

In time, the people began to 
call the new pasttime the "Game of 
Gof." It is much the same today 
though it is now know as golf. 



urrent Sauce 

ESTABLISHED 1914 

Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weeklv in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
scription $3 the year payable in advance. 

Member of the Associated Collegiate Press 

Duffy Wall Editor-in-Chief 

Sharon Hillman Associate Editor 

Linda Weber News Editor 

Jerry Brill Sports Editor 

Jean Wall Society Editor 

John Lewis Business Manager 

Linda Broughton .... Advertising Manager 

Jon Gibson staff Artist 

Roy G. Clark Faculty Adviser 

Editorial Staff: Mary Ellen Davis, Walley 
Hebert, Kenneth Baker. 

Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not reflect 
the opinions of the student body or the 
administration and faculty of the college 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1964 





Dave Gleason 





Hubert Adams 

Adams, Gleason 
Tie Br Weekly 
Sfagg Aw$rd 

Winners of the Alonzo stagg 
Award for their action displayed 
in the game against the Univer- 
sity of Southwestern were Hubert 
Adams and Dave Gleason. Adams 
is a 200 pound sophmore end who 
comes from Zachary, Gleason is 
a Senior fullback tipping the 
scales at 210 pounds and hales 
from Port Sulphur. 

There were al,so ten p'ayeib 
making the honor roll this week. 
Eight of them making it on offen- 
se while only two making it on 
defense. On offense it was Grover 
Colvin, Fred Fulton, Louis Richard 
Monte Ledbetter, Ted Wimberly, 
Don Beasley, Bobby Parker, and 
Dave Gleason. 

Kenny Guillot and Hubert Adams 
were the only two to make it on 
defense. 




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The NSC basketball team will 
open their 1964-65 schedule before 
this paper will be put out again 
with the Demons hosting South- 
eastern Oklahoma, coached by 
Bloomer Sullivan. 

We think that it should be men- 
tioned that Sullivan is one of the 
finest coaches in basketball. He 
has been coach in Oklahoma for 
27 years and since then, has be- 
come the number four ranked 
coach in the nation in number of 
games won. Not only is he the 
proud owner of this distinction, he 
also ranks second among these top 
four percentage wise. 

In 798 basketball games, he 
has been victorious in 608 of 
them, losing only 190 times. This 
figures out to an amazing .762 per- 
cent. It is also said that during the 
whole game, he will be chewing on 
either a match or a toothpick. If 
one of his men fails to do some- 
thing right, don't be surprised if 
he jumps off the bench and calls a 
time out. 

The games will be played on 
Nov. 27-28. This is a bad time for 
the games to be scheduled, but if 
we can't be here for the game in 
person, lets be sure to be here in 
spirit. 

Ever had one of those weeks 
when nothing seems to go right. 
That is exactly what this column 
experienced this past week. It all 
started when a pack of Bulldogs 
jumped upon a group of Demons to 
spoil a homecoming event. Then 
right behind this was fabulous Tu- 
lane, a team that just can't be pre- 
dicted with any confidence. If you 
go against them, they can pull a 
major upset. If you go with them, 
you usually just ask yourself why. 
Even Ole Miss isn't consistent. 
Down one week, number one mat- 
erial the next. Now comes Baylor, 
pick them to win, they lose. Pick 
them to lose, they win. One thing 
for sure, this column can't win. 

One game we are proud of is the 
La. Tech-Southern Miss. game. We 
picked Tech to drop their first 
game by six points. The Mississi- 
ppi club obliged us by handing the 
Bulldogs their first loss, winning 
by a total of seven points. 

Well anyway, the season record 



now stands at 61 right, 17 wrong, 
and 3 ties. This is good for an aver- 
age of .753. Well, another try: 
SLC (13) over NSC - - - Demons 
make it four in a row as they are 
treed by a hungary bunch of Lions. 
McNeese (10) over USL Bull- 
dogs will be caught flatfooted as 
they are still gloating over a De- 
mon victory. 

La. Tech (28) over Northeast - - - 
It will be a mad bunch of Bulldogs 
at the Indian reservation. Tech still 
upset after being impounded in 
Mississippi. 

LSU (14) over Tulane - - - Mighty 
Tigers make a feast out of a group 
of Greenies. 

Arkansas (14) over Texas Tech - - 
It could be an interesting ball game 
with both teams expecting bowl 
bids. Could be the upset of the 
year. 

Rice (7) over TCU - - - Owls have 
something to hoot at and frogs 
have something to croak about as 
Rice shows form that they are cap- 
able of showing. 

Baylor (7) over SMU - - . Mustangs 
still shell shocked from the licking 
taken from the Razorbaeks. Bears 
showed they have it in last weeks 
win over Kentucky. 
Notre Dame (14) over Iowa - - - 
Irishmen aren't about to let a per- 
fect record and a national champ- 
ionship fall out of their hands this 
far in the season. Iowa better pull 
out their four leaf clovers. 
Florida (7) over Florida State - - - 
Another one of those heads you 
win, tails I lose, games. 
Ohio State (3) over Michigan - - - 
Buckeyes keep up record in hope 
for a Rose Bowl bid. 



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Demons To Make Final Appearance 
Against SLC Lions Here Saturday 



The Demons of NSC wind up 
their 1964 footbal grid season here 
Saturday night as they play host 
to the Southeastern Louisiana 
Lions. Kickoff is slated for 8:00 
p.m. 

The NSC club will be out to 



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NSC Cagers Open 
Basketball Season 
During Holidays 

Northwestern opens its 1964-65 
basketball season November 27 
and 28 as they take on the South- 
eastern Oklahoma Savages. The 
basketball squad will kick off the 
season in the newly completed col- 
iseum with a 3500 person seating 
capacity. 

The Demons, coached by Huey 
Cranford, will have six returning 
lettermen from last year's squad 
which won 12 games while losing 
14. The returning lettermen are 
David Clark, Emmett Hendricks, 
Kenny Arthur, Sam Watts, Jerry 
McLaurin, and Billy Ray. 

Five members of the 1963 team 
will not return this season. Among 
these is all Gulf States Conference 
guard Tommy Mathis, who led the 
Demons in scoring with a 14.1 
points per game average. 

NSC hopes to avenge last year's 
defeat to the Southeastern Okla- 
loma cagers as they were beaten 
twice by the Savages 89-79 in the 
first contest and 92-79 in the se- 
cond. 

The Demons will add seven new 
cagers to their 13 man roster this 
season. The new members are Ken- 
neth Simmons of Converse, Lester 
Lee, Natchitoches, Tommy Stewart, 
Doyline, Larry Rivers, Pitkin, Dan- 
ny Walker, Shreveport, and Den- 
nis Lewis from Henderson, Ken- 
tucky. 

The third game to be played 
in the coliseum is slated against 
Nicholls State College Dec. 1. The 
Demons trounced the Nicholls team 
in their first encounter last season 
96-73. 



break a three game losing streak 
that they are currently on. The 
latest loss was suffered at the 
hands of the USL Bulldogs by a 
score of 27-17. The Demons now 
stand at 4-4 and must win this 
affair if they expect to finish 
above the .500 mark. Southeastern 
will be coming into the game 
sporting a 3-2 record, their latest 
victim being a powerful McNeese 
club. The Lions will also be trying 
to hang on to second place in the 
conference as they now stand 2-1. 
This is compared to the Demon's 
1-3 conference record. 

The series between the two 
clubs has been a close and hard 
fought one. Since its beginning 
in 1936, NSC has been victorious 
eleven times while dropping 13. 
The longest winning streak is held 
by the Lions as theywere winners 
from 1949-1956, a total of eight 
games. The longest wining streak 
enjoyed by a Demon eleven was 
from 1938-1942, a totai of five 
games. NSC holds the edge in 
shutouts as they have held the 
Lions scoreless in five frays, and 
being held scoreless by Southeast- 
ern four times. The Demons are 
now enjoying a two game winning 
streak. 

In last years action, NSC made 
it two in a row over the Lions as 
they pulled out a win in a close, 
hard fought ball game. All the 
Demons played well but it was 
Bobby Parker who was the talk 
of Strawberry Stadium. Northwest- 
ern was able to score twice in the 
first half which proved to be 
enough as the Demons hung on to 
a 13-7 decision. 

Probable starting lineup for the 

Demons will be: 

TE Hubert Adams 

WT Ross Gwinn 

WG Grover Colvin 

C Fred Fulton 

SG Al Moreau or Phillip Creel 

ST Charles Ragus 

SE Dick Reding 

QB Don Beasley 

HB Ed Horton 

FL Gary Pittman 

FB Claude Patrick 



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Demons Lose Homecoming Game To USL; 
Season Record Stands At 4-4 




Slated to see plenty of action for the NSC Demons this 
week will be, left to right, guard, Grover Colvin, center, 
Fred Fulton, and tackle, Charles Ragus. This will be the 
final game for these three players as all are seniors. Game 
time will be 8 p.m. against Southeastern Louisiana College. 



Track Team Will Compete Saturday 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1964 



By Kenny Baker 

Northwestern State's Demons, 
unable to get their offense moving 
in the second half of play, dis- 
appointed a homecoming day 
crowd of 6500 in losing 27-17 to 
the University of Southwestern 
Louisiana Bulldogs. 
Moving the ball well in the first 
half, the Demons led in practically 
every statistic except the final 
score as they piled up a total of- 
fense of 362 yards on 21 first 
downs compared to USL's 300 
yards on 16 first downs. 

NSC controlled the ball through 
much of the first half on the 
strong running on halfback Dave 
Gleason and fullback Claude Pat- 
rick as they took a 17-14 advan- 
tage into the third quarter. 

The Demons were first to bight 
up the scoreboard as quarterback 
Donnie Carroll led his team on a 
62yard scoring drive in 6 plays. 
The touchdown came on a 24 yard 
pass play to halfback Al Dodd who 
faked two Bulldogs out of their 
shoes at the three yard line and 
maneuvered his way into the end 
zone. The PAT was good on a gick 
by Jimmy Scott and the Demons 
led 7-0 at the end of the first quar- 
ter. 

An earlier scoring attempt fell 
short at the seven yard bine as 
Scott missed on a field goal from 
that point. 

Northwestern lengthened its 
lead to 10 points with 9:04 left to 
play in the second quarter on a 
second field goal attempt by Scott. 
His toe proved true on this kick 
splitting the uprights from 35 
yards away. 

Four plays after the start of the 
second period the Demons again 
failed to take advantage of a scor- 
ing opportunity when Donnie Car- 
roll, on a fourth down and three 
situation elected to try a quarter- 
back sneak and ran headlong into 
a throng of Bulldog linemen. USL 
was penalized half the distance to 
the goal line on the play and they 
took over on their own one and a 
half yard line. 

Southwestern scored two touch- 
downs in less than four minutes in 
the second quarter as sophomore 
halfback Lonnie Price, who did not 
play high school football, scored 
both tallies on a 48 yard scamper 
and a 1 yard plunge up the middle. 
Wayne Walker kicked off to guar- 
terback Bill Bayard who returned 
the pigskin to the 32 and on the 
first play from scrimmage Price 
exploded with a 48 yard carry go- 
ing untouched into the end zone. 

NSC scored again late in the 
quarter as James Aymond skirted 



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around end six yards for the six- 
pointer. This play climaxed a 63 
yard drive and also marked the 
first touchdown scored by rushing 
on USL in 22 quarters of play. 

With the loss to USL, the De- 
mons washed away all hopes of 
finishing in the first division in 
the Gulf States Conference. This 
was the third straight conference 
loss by the Demons and they now 
stand -3 in GSC standings. 

Northwestern could not muster 
a single score in the second half 
of play while Southwestern racked 
up two third period touchdowns 
two bring their point total to 27. 

Bill Bayard led his charges on 
an 85 yard drive in 12 plays hitting 
Chester Gosnell on a pass for the 
final 13 stripes. Saddler kicked the 
PAT to give USL a 21-17 lead. 
Weber tallied Southwestern's final 
score on a 1 yard dive to bring the 
game-ending score to 27-17. 



Football Scramble 
Finishing Out 
Intramural Play 

The intramural football teams 
are now closing out their season 
as the race for the championship 
goes right down to the wire. All 
the teams in both leagues have 
completed their regular schedule 
of play and the four top teams will 
battle it out in the playoffs. 

Finishing first in their respec- 
tive leagues are the Knightkats in 
League 1 and the Piney Wood 
Rooters in League 2. The Knight- 
kats were the only team to com- 
plete league play without a loss, 
winning six games and tying one. 
The Piney Wood Rooters led their 
league with five wins, one tie, and 
only one loss. 

The second place teams in their 
leagues were the Coonies with six 
wins against two defeats and 
Brickshack with six wins and one 
loss. 

The playoffs are now beginning 
and the first place teams in each 
league will play the number two 
teams in their opposite leagues. 
The winners in these contests will 
play one final game for the champ- 
ionship. 



Demon Basketball 
Schedule Released 

Northwestern's new air-condi- 
tioned 5000-seat Coliseum, com- 
pleted last spring, will be the set- 
ting for this year's 26-game bas- 
keball schedule. 

The Demons open with a two- 
game series against Coach Bloom- 
er Sullivan's Southeastern Okla- 
homa Savages. Sullivan, after 27 
years, ranks among the top five 
winning coaches in the nation. His 
Oklahoma teams are always tough 
and will provide formidable foes 
for the Demons as they try their 
new "home." 

Fourteen home games are in- 
cluded in the 1964-6D slate an- 
nounced by Coach Huey W. Cran- 
ford, after approval by the Ath- 
letic Council. Newcomers are La- 
mar Tech, Delta State, and Ogle- 
thorpe University. The Demons 
play home and home contests a- 
gainst five Gulf States Conference 
opponents and vie with Southeast- 
ern Oklahoma, Nicholls, Louisiana 
College, Lamar Tech, Stephen F. 
Austin, Delta State, Southern Miss- 
issippi, Ogethorpe, and Centenary. 

The 1964-65 schedule: 
Nov. 27, Southeastern Okla., home 
Nov. 28, Southeastern Okla., home 
Dec. 1, Nicholls State, home 
Dec. 5, Louisiana College, home 
Dec. 7, Lamar Tech, away 
Dec. 12, Nicholls State, away 
Dec. 14, Delta State, away 
Dec. 17, Lamar Tech, home 
Dec. 30, Stephen F. Austin, away 
Jan. 2, Southwestern La, away 
Jan. 5, Southeastern, home 
Jan. 6, Southern Mississippi, home 
Jan. 8, McNeese State, home 
Jan. 12, Northeast State, away 
Jan. 16, Oglethorpe Univ., home 
Jan. 23, Centenary, home 
Jan. 28, Louisiana Tech, home 
Feb. 2, Southwestern La., home 
Feb. 4, Southern Mississippi, away 
Feb. 6, Southeastern, away 
Feb. 8, Centenary, away 
Feb. 13, McNeese State, home 
Feb. 16, Northeast State, home 
Feb. 23, Louisiana Tech, away 
March 1, Louisiana College, away 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
SERVICES 
Old Lemee House 
Jefferson St. 
Every Sunday 11:00 A.M. 
All are welcome 



The NSC cross-country track 
team will go into action once again 
this year as they play host to the 
Lions of Sontheastern College. The 
race will begin from in front of 
theMen's Gym. 

The team, under the direction 
of graduate assistance Ray Hale, 
have won their last two outings. 
They downed Southeastern in 
Hammond by a score of 22-30 and 
have downed McNeese by a score 
23-32 at Lake Charles. 

The Demons will also run in the 
New Orlean's Turkey Day Meet 
to be held on Thanksgiving. 

Northwestern has been streng- 



thened by the addition of Edward 
Watt to the team. Watt is from 
Great Britain and has placed first 
in all three meets he has started. 
Other members of the team in- 
clude Tony Ward, Bob Dufalo, 
Nick Wright, Dalton Phelps,Jim 
Phifer, and Tim Poston. 



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Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1964 



Contemporary Dancers 



Dr. Carlucci Will Represent College At Music Meet 




The Northwestern Department 
| of Music will be represented at the 
40th. Annual Meeting of the Na- 
tional Association of Schools of 
Music by Dr. Joseph B. Carlucci, 
department head. The general 
sessions this year will be held at 
the Statler-Hilton in St. Louis, on 



November 27th and 28th. 

The NSC Music Department has 
been an associate member of the 
NASM since 1961. The NASM has 
been designated by the National 
Commission on Accrediting as the 
responsible agency for the accredi- 
tation of all music degree curricu- 



la with specialization in the fields 
of applied music, music theory, 
composition, music therapy, music- 
ology, and music as a major in lib- 
eral arts programs. Its delibera- 
tions will play an importantpart in 
this country during the coming 
years. 



Two members of the Contemporary Dancers perform the 
"Sacrifice" dance. Participating in this is Julia Mahoney, 
standing, and Peggy Martin, lunging. 

Contemporary Dancers To Present 
Demonstration At LTA Convention 



The Contemporary Dancers of 
Northwestern will present a lec- 
ture demonstration, "Dance in Ed- 
ucation," at the Health and Phy- 
sical Education section of the Lou- 
isiana Teachers Convention at 
Youree Drive Junior High School 
in Shreveport, Nov. 23. 

Participants will be the entire 
Contemporary Dancers Club along 
with guest performers Eugene 
Noel, Doug Giles, Budgy Wall, 
Cliff Lambert, Donnie Carroll, 
Steve Nehring, Paul Nicholos, 
Ricky Evans and Don Willis. 

The ensemble will do movement 
fundamentals, locomotor funda- 
mentals and axial fundamentals; 
group techniques, square dances, 
tap dances, folk dances and mod- 
ern dances. 

The Contemporary Dancers are 
Carol Adkins, Janie Armstrong, 
Margaret Carroll, Joan Denham, 
Cleo Grandstaff, Mary Gilson, 
Phyllis Guidry, Stina Hellburg, 
Cedric Hudgens, Mary Lawless, 
Barbara Lloyd, Julia Mahoney, 



GOP Club Formed: 
Officers Elected 

A Young Republican Club has 
been organized on the NSC camp- 
us. Some of the beliefs of the YR's 
are: 

1. We believe we must definite- 
ly create the image of the Repub- 
lican Party in the minds of the 
people of the United States. We 
must clearly establish the things, 
we, as Republicans, believe in and 
stand for. 

2. We believe in a conservative, 
economy-minded government. 

3. We believe in helping the dis- 
tressed and the unfortunate, who 
are unable to help themselves; but 
we are opposed to the practice of 
attempting to solve all of our eco- 
nomy problems through give-away 
programs which destroy initiative 
and promote the welfare-state. 

4. We believe that every Ameri- 
can has the right to live his or her 
life without government subsidy 
or personal management. 

The following officers were elec- 
ted at the meeting held November 
12: Fred Newman, president; Rita 
Dobbins, recording secretary; Mar- 
garet F. Owen, corresponding sec- 
retary and treasurer; William 
Long, social chairman; and Terry 
R. Brown, publicity chairman. 

The Young Republicans Club in- 
vites all interested people to come 
to the meetings and other social 
events sponsored by the club. The 
next meeting will be November 30 
in Room 201 of Fournet Hall at 
6:30 p. m. 



Gwen Marler, Maxine Mifflin, Bet- 
ty Morgan, Wavelyn Murray, Jane 
Plum, Betsy Pugh, Ramona Rey- 
nolds, Faye Rivers, Linda Smith, 
and Judy Winn. 



Kysers Entertain 
Women Leaders 

Dr. and Mrs. John S. Kyser en- 
tertained women student leaders 
at a chicken-spaghetti supper in 
the President's Cottage on Novem- 
ber 9. Those attending were: AWS 
officers; Kate Thibodeaux, Irby 
McCan, Mary Ann Jones, Carolyn 
Brewer, Barbara Wallace, Prissy 
Dorgan, Lynn Griffin, Lucy Hart, 
Betty Sue DeWitt, and Patricia Si- 
mon. 

Pan Hellenic Council; Rae Belle 
Warner, Ann Block, Carolyn Thom- 
as, and Celia Willis. 

Purple Jacket officers; Barbara 
Martin, Jo Ann Salter, and Carolyn 
Bellue. 



50 Volunteers 
Wanted For 1965 

A new and exciting opportunity 
in England is now offered to col- 
lege students wanting to spend 
next summer in Europe in an in- 
teresting way. 

You may help reveal the secrets 
of a Roman villa, an iron-age hill 
fort or the structure of a medieval 
town or Anglo-Saxon cathedral 
bofore they disappear, perhaps 
forever. Expanding housing pro- 
grams, city redevelopment and 
new possibilities for archaeologi- 
cal investigation. 

You may help in this important 
work, earn credits, make interna- 
tional friends and receive valuable 
training in archaeology, by joining 
a program sponsored by the Asso- 
ciation for Culaural Exchange, the 
British nan-profit organization. 

Volunteers first join a three 
week seminar for training in Bri- 
tish archaeology and excavation 
techniques at Westminster Col- 
lege, Oxford. They then split up 
into small groups for three or 
more weeks "digging" on an arc- 
haeological site. Total cost of the 
program is $575, including round- 
trip air transportation from New 
York. Part scholarships aree avai- 
able to suitable students with a 
"B" plus average. 

Write now for further details 
to U.S. Representative Dr. John H. 
Slocum, Association for Cultural 
Exchange, 202 West 10th Street, 
New York. Closing application 
date is January 8, 1965. 



Chuck says 
he paid 300 bucks 
less for 
his Coronet 
than you did 
for that turtle 
of yours 

\ 




You really 
know 
how to 
hurt a guy 



"Chuck's a swinger," says she. "His 
Coronet is quick and clean, with a lean 
and hungry look. It's equipped with a 
426 cubic inch mill that will mock your 
turtle at the strip or on the street. He's 
got four-on-the-floor, buckets, belts, 
carpets, console, spinners, and a padded 
dash. And he said that everything but 
the four-speed stick and the 426 
was standard." Then she broke his back 
by asking, "Didn't you pay extra for 
some of that jazz?" 

Don't let the truth hurt you. 
Better see the all-new, hot new Dodge 
Coronet before you buy a (cuckoo), 
a (cuckoo-cuckoo), or even a 
(cuckoo-cuckoo-cuckoo). 




'65 Dodge Coronet 



DODGE DIVISION 



CHRYSLER 

MOTORS CORPORATION 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 



Varsity Volleyball Winners 




Members of the NSC Volleyball team that won the Mid- 
south Tournament at Memphis November seventh are 
pictured above from left to right, front row: Cecil McPher- 
son, Rose Misaraca, and Sandra Foster. Back row: Shirley 
Hillman, Jinks Coleman, Roberta Wescott, Linda Harper, 
and coach Andrea Farrow. 



Junior Volleyball Winners 




Members of the NSC Volleyball "B" Team that placed 
second in the Midsouth Tournament held at the Memphis 
State University on November seventh are left to right, 
front row: Faye Belgard, Betty Fought, and Johnnie Keg- 
Ion. Second row: Bales Morgan, Liz Heitman, Dianne Law- 
rence, Sharlett Burgess, and Coach Andrea Farrow. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Editor: 

Here is a letter I found in an is- 
sue of the Current Sauce printed 
in 1958. To whom it may concern, 
read it and weep. The Attendance 
Officer may have her problems 
but: 

To the editor: 

Recent issues of the Current 
Sauce have been literally filled 
with letters condemning certain 
regulations, letters condemn- 
ing those who condemn, etc. 

However, little or no mention 
has been made of the numerous 
advantages which NSC offers 
its students. Certainly, there is 
room for complaint, but it seems 
to this writer that these "infrin- 
gements" on the rights of stu- 
dents are mediocre in nature 
and should possibly be dismiss- 
ed with a mere shrug of the 
shoulders. 

Some complain of the cafe- 
teria food, but there is no rule 
which compels students to eat 
in the college cafeteria. Others 
complain about regulations for 
women without realizing that 
women students here have more 
freedom than at many univer- 
sities. There are some who be- 
lieve that athletics are stressed 
too heavily — still others are 
present who would like a strong- 
er athletic program. 

Complaints may come in a 
variety of colors which often 
paint NSC a dark color in the 
eyes of prospective students. 
Actions of this nature are not 
only detrimental to the future 



enrollment of the school, but 
they materially affect the spirit 
of unity which should exist in 
any such organization of people 
of similar interests. 

This writer has no philosophy 
of student-school relationships, 
but it does seem that students 
could quietly attempt to change 
"undesirable" regulations and 
loudly acclaim the numerous 



Louisiana Studies 
Devotes Portion 

To Pierre Vitry 

The fall issue of Louisiana Stu- 
dies, publication of the Louisiana 
Studies Institute at Northwestern 
has been released with a major 
portion of the book devoted to the 
journal of Pierre Vitry, S. J. 

Miss Katherine Bridges, assistant 
professor of Library Science at 
Northwestern and a director of the 
Louisiana Studies Institute, is aut- 
hor of the introduction to the edi- 
tion of Louisiana Studies about 
Father Vitry, one of the first 
priests in the Natchitoches area. 

The manuscript of Father Vit- 
ry's account of the French War 
with the Chickasaws in 1738-1740, 
was sold at the Parke-Bernet Gal- 
leries in New York and was later 
presented to the Cornell Univer- 
sity. Through the efforts of Geor- 
ge H. Healey, curator of the de- 
partment of Rare Books at the 
Cornell library, a Xerox copy of 
the manuscript was obtained for 
the Russell Library. 

Father Vitry entered the Society 
of Jesus at Nancy in France on 
Oct. 18, 1719. He taught in the col- 
lege of Nancy for four years and 
for two years at the College of 
Langres before coming to New Or- 
leans in 1773. From New Orleans 
he went to Mobile, back to New Or- 
leans and finally to the Natchito- 
ches area. A few years later he was 
made superior of the Louisiana 
Jesuit mission and held this post 
until his death in New Orleans in 
1749. 

Permission to re-issue the jour- 
nal, translated by Father Jean De- 
langlez, was obtained from Jerome 
V. Jacobsen of Loyola University. 

Single copies of the quarterly 
publication which is in its third 
year are $1 and may be purchased 
from the Louisiana Studies Insti- 
tute, Northwestern State College. 
Annual subscriptions are $3.50. 



Concert Association To Present 
Walter Robert, Concert Pianist 



Hincker Attends 
Nursing Meet 

Miss Etta Anne Hincker, dean 
of the School of Nursing at North- 
western, is attending a meeting of 
the committee on economic secur- 
ity of the educational administra- 
tors, consultants and teachers sec- 
tion of the American Nurses Asso- 
ciation, in New York City, Nov. 
18-20. 

Miss Hincker is chairman of the 
committee which is currently de- 
voting its time to establishing a 
method for measuring "work load" 
for teachers in nursing. 



advantages and enjoyable re- 
lationships which exist here. 
David R. Robinson 
Agriculture 
Entered by 
Larry Bucknum 
Math 



Pie-Christmas Sale on Pictures 

1 8x10 Plus 16 Wallets 7.00 

1 5x7 Plus 8 Wallets 4.75 

3 8x10 Plus 8 Wallets 14.75 

1 8x10 3 5x7 Plus 8 Wallets 16.00 



UHRBACH'S STUDIO 

(Your Potpourri Photographer) 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 

NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 
Phones — 5556 — 5557 




Douglas Fowler 

Fowler Made 
Honorary Alumna 

Douglas Fowler, Sr., custodian 
of voting machines, State of Louis- 
iana, was made an honorary mem- 
ber of the Northwestern State 
College Alumni Association, in 
ceremonies at the annual NSC 
homecoming luncheon Saturday. 

Fowler, who is serving his sec- 
ond term as Custodian of Voting 
Machines, has been known as a 
friend of the college for many 
years. His wife Abbie Marston 
Fowler received a two-year certifi- 
cate in 1925, and a BS degree in 
the summer of 1959. One of his 
sons, Jerry, attended Northwestern 
and was an outstanding tackle for 
the Demon football team. He recei- 
ved the bachelor's degree in 1963. 

With this family interest in 
Northwestern and concern for the 
college which is so close to his 
home town of Coushatta, Fowler 
has through the years, pleaded the 
cause of Northwestern and has 
taken pride in seeing it grow. He 
has worked tirelessly for the grow- 
th of the college and has rendered 
valuable educational service in its 
cause. 

Fowler attended Louisiana State 
University and Draughn Business 
College and from 1952-55 served 
as mayor of Coushatta. He was 
Right-of-Way Agent for the De- 
partment of Highways from 1955- 
56 until he was appointed Custo- 
dian, Board of Voting Machines 
for the State. In 1960 he became 
the nation's first elected voting 
machine custodian when he was 
elected to that position with over 
800,000 votes. This year he won re- 
election in the first primary. 



Walter Robert, concert pianist 
and professor of piano in the Ind- 
iana University School of Music, 
will present a piano recital under 
the auspices of the Northwestern- 
Natchitoches Concert Association 
on December 3. The performance 
is scheduled for 8 p.m. in the Fine 
Arts Auditorium. 

Professor Robert has been on 
the Indiana University music facul- 
ty since 1947. Born in Trieste, he 
was educated in Vienna and did 
graduate work in Berlin. He has 
been assistant artist in concerts in 
Austria, Germany, Italy, Czecho- 
slovakia, Poland, Cuba, Canada, 
and the United States with Ossy 
Renardy, Carroll Glen, Patricia 
Travers, Frances Magnes, Anna 
Kaskas, Frederick Jaegel, and Joel 
Berglund. Professor Robert has 
presented solo recitals in Vienna, 
Bremen, Rome, Trieste, Potsdam, 
New York, Chicago, Fort Worth 
and Dallas, and has made many 
radio appearances. He has had a 
number of articles published in 
musicology and piano pedagogy. 

For the school year 1962-63, Pro- 
fessor Robert was an exchange 
professor under the Fulbright Act, 
teaching in the State Conservatory 
of Music in Naples, Italy. While in 
Italy he gave a number of lectures 
on topics of piano literature, con- 
temporary U.S. music, and music 
education in American universities 
and appeared in several recitals. 

Season tickets are still available 
and will be on sale at the door: $7 
for adults, $3.50 for children. Indi- 
vidual admissions for this event 
only are $2.20 for adults, $1.10 for 
children. NSC students will be ad- 
mitted by presenting L D. cards. 



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for perfect eyebrows . .naturally 



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Serving Natchitoches and NSC Since 1891 
Corner Front & Church Sts. Phone 2461 

FREE DELIVERY TO ALL COLLEGE DORMS 



Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1964 



Sigma Tau Float 




The winning Float in the Homecoming parade held last 
Saturday was entered by Sigma Tau Gamma. Their float, 
in keeping with the Homecoming theme, emphasized the 
number of graduates and the continuing growth of the 
college. 



NSC Flying Club 
Seeking Members 

Students interested in joining a 
flying club are urged to attend an 
organizational meeting at the 
ROTC Armory at 6 p. m. Novem- 
ber 26. 

Flying clubs are recognized as a 
way to provide economical flying 
to members. These clubs are form- 
ed as non-profit organizations and 
are highly successful throughout 
the country. 

The weather in this locality pro- 
vides almost year round flying 
weather. Therefore, plans are be- 
ing made to purchase a suitable 
type aircraft for training. Adequa- 
tely qualified persons will be pre- 
sent to provide instruction in fly- 
ing. 



Badminton Open To 
Students, Faculty 

Recreational badminton for wo- 
men students and faculty and staff 
members began November 16 at 
5:30 and will be every Monday 
night thereafter. Team tryouts will 
be held along with the recreation- 
al play. 

For those interested in tourna- 
ments, there will be two on our 
campus this year, the Louisiana 
Open on December 11 and 12 and 
the Southern Open in March. 

For the first time in the history 
of the National Badminton Champ- 
ionships, the National Tournament 
will be held in the South this year. 
It will be held in New Orleans dur- 
ing the Easter Holidays. 



Malts 



Frosted Drinks 
Hamburgers 
Southern Maid Do-Nuts 



Visit 



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For Free Delivery To Dorm Call — 2385 



LETTERS 

Dear Editor, 

Once upon a time in a far away 
kingdom there was a great and 
wonderful book that contained the 
Law of the Land. On page XVIII 
of the sixth chapter, there was a 
footnote that said "A sound body 
must have a sound mind, and vice 
versa." 

So it came to pass that the in- 
habitants of the land built a great 
edifice worthy of any number of 
gods, but it was consecrated to the 
God of Health and Strength, and it 
was decided that the priests of the 
God of Song could use it too, since 
it was so great and marvelous. 

After all, prayers to any God 
could surely be heard, for a mere 
man could whisper at one end, and 
another could hear well at the 
other. 

The temple was so great that it 
would hold every person in the en- 
tire kingdom, and people from ot- 
her lands as well. 

However, some god became dis- 
pleased because he had to share 
the temple with another, and he 
caused cracks to appear in the 
roof. 

A meeting was called and it was 
decided to patch the roof, because 
a festival was to be held in the 
temple by some people of another 
kingdom, before anyone from this 
kingdom could worship there. 
(Probably to test it.) 

All went well with the glorious 
and great temple, and people came 
from every land of the country to 
show their friends the wonderful 
structure that had patched cracks 
in the roof. 

The services of worship to the 
various gods that now inhabitated 
the temple were good, and every 
man in the kingdom could be seat- 
ed within. 

The various altars had been cho- 
sen for their portability, because 
it was soon seen that the temple 
was to be used for all gods. 

The gods became disturbed at 
this, but they didn't act, for they 
trusted their priests to move the 
altars and reconsecrate the tem- 
ple each time. 

But soon the priests grew lan- 
guid and failed to move the altars 
after each service. 

And the gods grew angry and 
caused it to rain for ten days and 
nights, and the drains in the park- 
ing lot grew clogged, and rain came 
in and warped the altars. And the 
priests failed to understand. 

(Any resemblance between the 
altars and certain basketball courts 
is purely intentional) 

"Sonny" N. B. Carter 



CHIEF DRIVE-IN 



Now Showing Through Saturday 



Robert Goulet 
'Honeymoon Hotel' 
— Color — 



Bob Hope 
(And the Global Girls) 
"A GLOBAL AFFAIR" 



Sunday — Monday — Tuesday 



Their First Full Length Motion Picture 

'McHale's Navy' 

Ernest Borginine — Joe Fletcher — Jim Conway 
And The Whole McHale's Crew — Color 



CANE THEATRE 

Natchitoches, La. Phone 2922 



Friday & Saturday 




UK aidson cottasaw-iUMsausiw bust snuni 

— Plus 



VECTOR BUONO 

Shock Sensation of "Baby Jane" 



'BUCKNITES"— Wednesday & Thursday 



James Dean 
'REBEL WITHOUT 
A CAUSE" 
— Color — 



Troy Donahue 
'ROME ADVENTURE' 
— Color — 



Sunday — Tuesday 



JAMES DARREN PAMELATIFFIN; 
DOUG McCLURE- JOANIE SOMMERS 



Starts Wednesday 



■mm rams bmi (3IMBRS0N9 




Pittman Rambles 




Gary Pittman breaks away for short yardage from two 
USL Bulldogs in Saturday's homecoming game. Demon 
efforts were not enough to overcome the tremendous 
power of the Bulldogs, as the Demons were beaten 27-17. 



Students ! ! 

Why not assure that the next visit of parents or 
friends is a memorable one in all respects? 

EI Camino Real Motel 



Highway 6 West 



Phone 4426 



DON 
Theatre 



BOX OFFICE OPENS 

Mon.-Fri 5:45 

Sat. & Sun 12:45 



NOW SHOWING 




SATURDAY'S DOUBLE FEATURE 



Slam-' bam/Hereo»\SSam/ 

ft Jaac fttflty 
rt'^lOIIMON'SCMBDBt, 




RING OF 



EdmA&RoaNSON 




A PARAMOUNT RELEASE 



The Spy Ring 
That Saved The 
World 



Sunday Through Wednesday 



I 



SANDRA DEE 
ROBERT GOULET 
ANDY WILLIAMS 




» toss Humtn r,«iMm 

Id Rather 
Be Rich" 



•l*smA» COLOR. 



»ni 



MAURICE CHEVALIER- 



w Philip Duiairw / A Universal Picture < 



..LJ 



Coming Soon! "BEACH PARTY' 




auce 



VOL. LI— No. 12 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1964 



Annual Christmas Festival Activities fl$C StUdefltS Die In Crash 



Scheduled To Begin Saturday Afternoon 



A highlight of the fall semester 
here at Northwestern, the Natchi- 
toches Christmas Festival of 
Lights, will occur tomorrow in the 
city. 

This year's festival will climax 
the celebration of the 250th Anni- 
versary of the Founding of Natchi- 
toches. Beginning the activities will 
be the parade, forming on Second 
Street at 2 p. m. Many students or- 
ganizations have entered floats in 
the contest. Later in the afternoon, 
the Caddo Ski Bees will perform on 
Cane River Lake. 

Norman Fletcher of KNOC and 
Northwestern's purchasing agent 
Weldon Walker will be in charge 
of the program on the Fleur De Lis 
stage beside the Front Street brid- 
ge. They will narrate the history of 
the Christmas Festival, and the 
fireworks and lighting display 
which begins at 6:30 p. m. 

The beginning of this tradition 
was in the year 1927 when Max 
Bergdorf, then superintendent of 
utilities for the city of Natchitoch- 
es, decided there was a definite 
need of something to express the 
Spirit of Christmas. As a result of 
a consultation between him and the 
late A. T. Ortmeyer, at that time 
Commissioner of Utilities for the 
city, the present annual Christmas 
Festival was established. 

These men received 100% coop- 
eration from the business people 
and the city officials in their plans. 
Among the first pieces was a huge 
star, it being about 8 feet across, 
was put at the top of a tall pole 
and erected at the east end of the 
bridge across Cane River. Since 
that time the size of the star has 
been increased to a width of more 
than 20 feet. 

Bulbs were used in the set peices 
that line the banks of the lake de- 
corating the trees that are placed 
at vantage points, and as effective 
decorations on the principal st- 
reets in the city. At present over 
150,000 bulbs are used. 

The next step, initiated by John 
Cunningham and A. C. Massingil 
with S. E. West and A. T. Cox, was 
the introduction of a fireworks dis- 
play that has risen from the origi- 
nal $250 to over $2000. The num- 
ber of people attending the annual 
program has increased so that du- 
plicate sets of set pieces, aerial 
displays, bombs, etc., have to be 
fired simultaneously from either 
side of the bridge in the center of 
the city. 

The entire program is now under 



the direction of a special Christmas 
Festival Committee, a division of 
the Natchitoches Parish Chamber 
of Commerce. These people start 
planning the Festival in January 
and work constantly to complete 
their plans by the first Saturday 
in December when the Festival is 
held. The funds to put it on are 
raised by the sale of advertising in 
the souvenir programs available at 
no cost to the visitors. 



Fraternity Sponsors 
Seminar Saturday 

A half-day seminar to aid in 
evaluating the effectiveness of 
programs in teacher education will 
be held on the campus of North- 
western on Saturday. The seminar 
is being sponsored by the Zeta 
Alpha Campus Chapter of Phi Del- 
ta Kappa, a professional fraterni- 
ty for men in education, in co- 
operation with the school of edu- 
cation of the college. 

According to Dr. W. A. Philp, 
president of the fraternity chap- 
ter, the object of the discussions 
will be to obtain as much first- 
hand information as possible on 
the applicability of college 
course work to the problems 
actually encountered by the be- 
ginning teacher in the public 
school classroom. 
From the results of the discus- 
sions, the college hopes to gain in- 
formation which will enable the 
faculty to improve its offerings and 
to provide for Louisiana schools 
teacher graduates who are more 
capable than before in helping 
Louisiana's children to make the 
most of their individual learning 
capacities. 

Among those participating in 
the seminar discussions will be 
the following recent graduates: 
Joyce Arduengo, Tanyau Bracey, 
Thomas Carson, Sharon Corbell, 
Sam Dauzat, Ann Fowler, Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward Hearron, Arthur 
Jones, Juanita Maxwell, Dell 
Morgan, Carolyn Ortego, Martha 
Kay Sandlin, Linda Sawyer, John 
Skinner, and Dale Tinsley. 
Members of Phi Delta Kappa who 
will be participating will be: Dr. 
George Kemp, Dr. John Morrow, 
Dr. Guy Nesom, Stanley Burkett, 
L. H. Hennigan, Dr. W. A. Philp, 
Dr. Lisso Simmons, Richard Gallo- 
way, Lacy Marcotte, Leonard Fow- 
ler, Charles Palmer, Ralph Cran- 
ston, and William Baker. 



Suzanne Maynard To Study In Vienna; 
Scheduled To Leave In February 



Suzanne Maynard, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Doyle Maynard of 
Natchitoches and a junior at North- 
western, has been accepted for a 
semester of study at the Univer- 
sity of Vienna in Austria, through 
a program sponsored by the Insti- 
tute for European Studies. 

Miss Maynard was accepted by 
the University on the basis of her 
application which required a B 
average in academic courses, at 
least a year of a foreign langu- 
age, a serious purpose for want- 
ing to study abroad, and sopho- 
more or junior standing. She al- 
so had the outstanding recom- 
mendations of three people in- 
cluding her dean and her advi- 
sor. 

Scheduled to leave from New 
York on Feb. 4 on the Queen Eliza- 
beth, Miss Maynard will take a 
nine-day European tour before be- 
ginning classes at the University. 

While in Vienna she will live 
with a Viennese family and pur- 
sue a liberal arts course of study 
until June 27 when the semester 
ends. Another phase of the pro- 
gram will include spending the 




While Returning To School Sunday 




Lavern Russell 



Geneva Russell 



Lewis, Britton Are Guest Speakers 
For Students Interested In Law 



Suzanne Maynard 

two-week Easter vacation in Italy. 

Miss Maynard is a 1962 graduate 
of Natchitoches High School and is 
a sociology major at Northwestern. 
She is a member of Delta Zeta. 



George Lewis, a member of the 
Northwestern business department; 
and Jack Brittain, a resident of 
Natchitoches, will be the guest 
speakers at an informal coffee to 
be held December 8 at 7 p. m. in 
the Home Economics Lounge for 
those students, both men and wo- 
men, interested in law. 

Mr. Lewis, a graduate of Blooms- 
burg State College, Pennsylvania, 
received his LL.B from Dickinson 
School of Law in 1946. He was a 
member of Phi Kappa Psi, and has 
been awarded a life membership in 
Corpus Juris, the honorary legal 
fraternity. Mr. Lewis was also the 
Law Librarian, Secretary to the 
Dean of the School of Law, and 
business manager of the Law Re- 
view. Having been in the Navy Air 
Force, he is now the Aviation Un- 
derwriter for the three states of 
Louisiana, Arkansas, and Mississ- 
ippi. 

Mr. Brittain received a degree in 
business administration from Lou- 
isiana Tech, and a degree in law 
from LSU in 1956. He served as an 
officer in the Army for three years, 
and as president of both the Junior 
Chamber of Commerce, and the 
Chamber of Commerce of Natchito- 
ches. He has been chosen as one of 
the 10 most outstanding young men 
in the nation by the Junior Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

The subjects will be "Courses 
for Pre-Law Preparation", and "Al- 
ternate Careers for Those with Law 
Degrees." 




George Lewis 



Counselor For Medical Corps 
To Visit NSC Wednesday 

Major Lois MacTaggart, person- 
nel counselor for the Army Medi- 
cal Specialist Corps, will visit the 
Northwestern campus to interview 
students who are interested in eit- 
her advanced study in dietetics or 
food management with the AMSC, 
Wednesday, Dec. 9. 

The Major will confer with stu- 
dents in the Living Room of the 
Home Economics Building. Major 
MacTaggart is from Fort Sam Hou- 
ston, Texas. 



Graduate Remains 
On Critical List 

Three Northwestern students 
were killed late Sunday in a two- 
car collision just south of Campti. 

Also killed in the accident was 
a student from Campti High School 
and a fifth victim was critically 
injured and taken to Schumpert 
Hospital in Shreveport. 

Four of the persons involved in 
the crash were returning to the 
campus following the Thanksgiv- 
ing holidays and the high school 
student was returning to Campti 
and traveling alone at the time of 
the accident. 

The victims were identified as: 
Hazel Louise Russell, 20, an ac- 
counting major at NSC, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Luther F. Russell 
of Sondheimer, La. 

Wanda Louise Hall, 21, a senior 
nursing major at NSC and the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. D. 
Hall of Epps. 

Phillip E. Wheeler, 21, a senior 
math major at NSC, grandson of 
Mrs. Cora Edwards of Tallulah. 

Wilson Lee Frick, 17, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Frick of 
Campti and a senior at Campti 
High School. 

Geneva Russell was injured and 
taken to Schumpert Hospital in 
critical condition. Miss Russell, 21, 
is a 1964 Northwestern graduate 
who is a teacher in Groves, Texas. 

State Trooper Lamen Weaver, 
who investigated the Sunday night 
collision at Campti, said the acci- 
dent occurred about 5:30 p.m. on 
a curve about a quarter of a mile 
south of Campti. 

He said the two cars met head- 
on on State Hwy. 486, known as 
the Campti Cutoff, and that there 
was no evidence of excessive 
speed. 

The carload of NSC students was 
believed to have been driven by 
Hazel Russell but was owned by 
her sister, Miss Geneva Russell. 



Hennigan To Serve 
On TV Panel At 
USL Wednesday 

Thomas L. Hennigan, director of 
the Audio-Visual Center at North- 
western, will be one of the panel- 
ists in a discussion "Is Educational 
Broadcasting Necessary," at the 
University of Southwestern Louis- 
iana, Lafayette, Dec. 11. 

Hennigan, who is coordinator 
of the closed-circuit network at 
NSC, one of the state's foremost 
authorities on educational televi- 
sion, pioneered the field in Lou- 
isiana. It was largely through his 
leadership that the NSC closed- 
circuit network, the state's only 
operating system, was establish- 
ed. 

The NSC network which has 
been in operation for approximate- 
ly three years, channels programs 
to eight campus buildings. At pre- 
sent five sections of four courses 
are being taught via television at 
NSC. 

Hennigan received the bache- 
lor's degree from Northwestern, 
the master's from the University 
of Missouri, and is currently 
working towards the doctorate 
in audio-visual education at Ind- 
iana State University. 

The hour-long panel at South- 
western, composed of Hennigan 
and several other men in the field, 
will include a number of aspects of 
educational television and radio. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1964 



DZ Pledges Will 
Entertain Actives 

Delta Zeta pledges will enter- 
tain the actives at a Christmas par- 
ty to be held December 14. Gifts of 
toys will be exchanged between 
actives and their secret little sis- 
ters and later distributed to needy 
children. 

Delta Zetas have spent a busy 
week carrying out plans for their 
Christmas booth at the annual 
Christmas lighting festival. We 
would like to take this opportunity 
to invite each of you to visit our 
booth and enjoy refreshments. 

In the next week, Epsilon Beta 
Chapter will present a Christmas 
program with the assistance of Dr. 
Lee Tarver at a local nursing 
home. We are looking forward to 
this visit with the senior citizens 
of Natchitoches. 



College Groups 
May Try-out For 

World's Fair Show 

Hailed as the "Star of the Show" 
at the World's Fair, the New York 
State Exhibit, which this year fea- 
tured over 67,900 performers from 
over 1,800 New York non-professio- 
nal community groups, is inviting 
college organizations throughout 
the United States to appear in the 
Exhibit's huge "Tent of Tomorrow" 
during the 1965 season of the Fair. 

College bands, orchestras, choirs, 
glee clubs, quartets, drum and bu- 
gle corps, drill teams, gymnastic 
teams, combos, hootenanny groups 
and virtually all types of college 
group performances are invited to 
perform as part of the Special 
Events program in the mammoth 
"Tent of Tomorrow". Over 60,000 
people witness performances each 
day. 

College organizations wishing to 
perform are asked to contact the 
Director of Special Events, New 
York State Commission on the 
World's Fair, 1270 Avenue of the 
Americas, New York, New York 
10020. 



Patronize 

Our 
Advertisers 



Catering to those who 
care about the health and 
beauty of their hair 

CHARM 
BEAUTY SHOP 

One-half Block 
From The Campus 

Phone 3948 114 Lee St. 
Open Monday Noon Till 
Saturday Noon 



For The Best 
Food In Town 

Stop In 

At The 

WADDLE 'N 
GRILL 

Phone 4949 
HIGHWAY 1 SOUTH 



Dr. Robinson Will 
Be Chairman At 
National Meeting 

Dr. Walter J. Robinson, profess- 
or and head of Department of In- 
dustrial Education at Northwest- 
ern, will preside at the annual 
meeting of the National Associa- 
tion of Industrial Teachers Educa- 
tors, in Minneapolis, Minn., Dec. 
6-9. 

Dr. Robinson is currently serv- 
ing as president of the Association, 
a professional organization seeking 
to improve the status of industrial 
teacher-educators. Membership in 
the Association includes teachers 
throughout the U. S. and all Cana- 
dian provinces. 

On Monday, Dr. Robinson will 
preside over a joint luncheon meet- 
ing with the American Technical 
Association. 



KAs, Coonies Team 
Up For Bowl Game 

Members of the Gamma Psi 
chapter spent their Thanksgiving 
holiday at their homes but Satur- 
day night came around they at- 
tended a fine dance at the 40&8 
Club in Shreveport featuring 
"Good Rockin' Luke and the Cas- 
sanovas." The affair was termed a 
huge success. In the future is the 
250th celebration of the Christmas 
Lights Festival which members 
plan to attend. Final plans are 
being made for the Children's 
Christmas Party to be held on 
Tuesday, December 15. 

Training has begun for the Char- 
ity Bowl Game in which two com- 
bined teams will meet on the grid- 
iron. Kappa Alpha and the Coon- 
ies have joined forces to meet 
Sigma Tau Gamma and B Frame. 
There will be 24 men on each 
team with 12 from each group go- 
ing to make up the single team. 

Coaching staff for the KA-Coon- 
ie squad is Gary Pittman, Allen 
Plummer, Kenny Guillot, Al Mo- 
reau and Donnie Carroll. They will 
be putting together the best possi- 
ble and well trained team from 




Serving as officers of Blue Key, national honor fraternity, 
this year are: (bottom row) Steve Blount, vice-president; 
and Roy Corley, historian; (second row) W. O. Crain, presi- 
dent; and Henry Mayfield, reporter; (top row) Jimmy 
Berry, alumni secretary; Bill Phillips, corresponding sec- 
retary; and Joseph Nolan Traigle, secretary-treasurer. 



Pina Designing 
Another Winning 
Float For Tau's 

Bob Pina, designer for the first- 
place homecoming float is in 
charge of designing the Christmas 
float for the Sigma Tau Gamma 
pledge class. 

Another upcoming Tau event 
will be its annual "Rip Snorter" 
to be held Saturday night immed- 
iatey after the Christmas lighting. 
The dance wil be held at St. 
Mary's High School| Auditorium 
with the Capris from Alexandria 
playing. 

The current Tau project is the 
Charity Bowl to be held December 
16 at 6 p.m. Admission will be 
twenty-five cents. The game will 
see Sigma Tau and "B" Frame 
pitted against Kappa Alpha and 
the "Coonies" in Demon Stadium. 
Those boys on the Tau, "B" Frame 
team are Trigger Allen, Jeff Har- 
ris, Derell Strother, Butch Wiggins, 
Eugene Smith, Bob Koll, Mike Mc- 
Daniel, Kenny Gault, O. L. Evans, 
Fred Parker, Bill Schwartz, Rod- 
ney Elkins, Bill Murphy, George 
Robinson, Bill Holsteader, Barry 
Guillet, Jack Hollinghead, Johnny 
Smith, Jim Bosler, Jim Hollings- 
worth, Jim Beam, Dickie Jester, 
Everrett Phillips, and Bobby Bond. 



Euthentics Dinner 

The freshmen of the Euthentics 
Club honored the upperclassmen 
with a party at the Wesley Foun- 
dation November 19. After roast- 
ing hot dogs in the open fireplace, 
the group was entertained by 
various freshmen members. 



the spirited material they have to 
work with. 

Members of our chapter wish to 
thank the Coonie intramural club 
for their participation and coopera- 
tion in helping to field this combi- 
nation team. We hope to roll over 
the opposition in what is hoped to 
be the finest Charity Bowl ever 
held on campus. Wednesday night, 
December 16 is the date set for the 
game; all proceeds will go to chari- 
ty. So everyone come to the game- 
it will be a good one surely. 




STUDENTS 

Let us pamper your 
parents when they come 
to visit you. 

For Room Reservations 
dial 6401 

'Wake-up Coffee and Papers' 




750 
FRONT ST. 



'A FRIENDLY Store' 



Your Favorite Brands 



FOR HER 

• "Vicky-Vaughn and Marty" Dresses 

• "Paddle & Saddle" Sportswear 

• "Happy Hiker" Shoes 

• "Phil-Maid" Lingerie and Sleepwear 

• "Best-Form" Bras and Foundations 

FOR HIM 

• "Lee Rider" Jeans 

• "Sports-Fan" Ivy Pants 

• "Wesboro" Shoes 

• "E&W" Shirts 

• "B.V.D." Underwear 

Charge Accounts Invited 



CHRISTMAS GIFT HEADQUARTERS 



FOR HER: 

• THE FINEST BY 

REVLON 
SHALIMAR 
CHANEL NO. 5 
MAX FACTOR 
DOROTHY GREY 

• CANDY 

HOLLINGSWORTH 
PANGBURN 




FOR HIM: 

• TOILETRIES BY 

REVLON 
MAX FACTOR 
FABERGE' 

• PIPES and 
SMOKING SUPPLIES 



Two Stores To Serve You 
DeBLIEUX' PHARMACY NEW DRUG mm 



BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 
PHONE 4582 



SECOND AND ST. DENIS 
PHONE 2386 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



Dr. Strangecut 



(Or: How I Learned To Stop 
Cutting And Love The Atten- 
dance Officer) 

By Henry Joyner 

Last week when I was released 
from the infirmary after 24 hours 
of chills, fever, aspirin, and well 
well-well-how-are-you-doing's, I dis 
covered that I had been counted 
absent in my "Underwater Basket 
Weaving 361" class. In order to 
remedy the situation, I learned, 
one must see the Attendance Of- 
ficer who "... may approve ex 
cuses signed by parents or physi- 
cian." Armed with an affidavit 
signed by two doctors, the nurse 
on duty, and three character wit- 
nesses, I limped into the atten 
dance office in Caldwell's base 
ment. 

A small group of people were 
gathered around the desk in the 
center of the room. I overheard 
one young man, obviously a stu 
dent, say: 

"But my mother was on her 
death bed crying, 'Marvin. Marvin 
my darling son Marvin.' What was 
I to do? I had to go to her." 

"Did she sign an excuse?" ask 
the lady behind the desk. 
"No, but . . . ." 

"I'm sorry, but if you don't 
have an excuse signed by your 
parents, you'll have to be dropped 
from your 'Modern Yiddish Folk 
Dancing' class with an F." 

"But my uncle, he was there, 
he'll tell you," said the boy, clasp- 
ing the man standing next to him. 

"Unless you have an excuse 
signed by your parents, you will 
be dismissed from the college and 
will not be allowed to return un- 
til next Fall," she said. 

The boy gasped. "But I'll have 
to go back to chopping cotton on 
our little share crop farm to sup- 
port my eleven brothers and sis- 
ters, and I'll never . . . ." 

"NEXT," said the lady, pointing 
at me. 

I trembled uncontrollably. 
As I edged slowly toward the 
desk, I extended the doctor's note 
which fluttered wildly as my hand 
twitched. 

The lady took my excuse, exa- 
mined it closely, set her magnify- 
ing glass on the desk, and asked: 

"Why didn't you have this excuse 
notarized by a notary public?" 

"Cough, cough, gasp, gag, 
wheeze, ugghh . . . , "I answered. 

"Come, come now young man. 
Don't try to play upon my sympath- 
ies!" she said, striking the desk 



with her swaggerstick. 

"Gubble, sniff, kappugheluv . . ," 
I wheezed, doubled over twitching 
on the floor. 

"The excuses some of you people 
try to pull," she said shaking her 
head. "I can't believe you think 
that I'm so gullible as to accept 
such a ridiculous one as: 'He was 
unable to attend class due to an ap- 
pendectomy.' How far fetched can 
you get?" • 

Gaining control of myself, I tried 
to show her the stitches over the 
incision. 

"Here," she said, thrusting a 
long white printed form in my di- 
rection. "When you have complete- 
ly filled this out, endeavor to think 
up an original excuse!" 

I tried my best to make the twit- 
ching pen write the answers to 
the questions, however, a few of 
the questions were quite difficult: 
"Blood type, maiden name and reli- 
gious preference of your maternal 
grandmother?" "If your father's 
make of automobile is Volkswagon, 
what is the generator serial num- 
ber? If not, why?" "Any family his- 
tory of mononucleosis? If not, 
why?" "Any distinguishing moles 
on the attending physician?" But 
the question that threw me was: 
"Do you buckle up for safety?" 

After I filled out the question- 
aire, I handed it back to her and 
asked: 

"By the way, in the 3V2 hours I 
have been here filling out the form 
to get the excuse for 'Underwater 
Basket Weaving,' I have missed the 
lab for 'Goat and Yak Milking 317.' 
Will I be able to get an excuse for 
it also?" 

Not unless you have an excuse 
signed by your parents, a physi- 
cian, and/or the Parish Coroner 
of Avoyelles Parish. Or," she said, 
tilting her head slightly, "you can 
write an original excuse which has 
never been tried before." 

Once again I sat down and began 
to write. Finally I handed her the 
form on which I had written: "On 
the way to class I was bitten by a 
rabid hare-lipped pelican." 

Upon receipt of this, she immed- 
iately signed a little white card, 
handed it to me, and said: 
"Go, and cut no more!" 
As I was leaving I did a slight 
dance and leaped into the air 
clicking my heels, where upon I 
remembered that both of the class- 
es are above 300 and I didn't need 
an excuse after all. Slowly I trug- 
ged over to the Student Center, re- 
solving to slit my wrists immediate- 
ly after my next class. 



- Student Council Minutes 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 




Nov. 23, 1964 

A meeting of the Northwestern 
Student Council was held Monday, 
November 23, at the home of Pres- 
ident and Mrs. John Kyser follow- 
ing a supper which the Kysers gave 
for the council. The meeting was 
called to order by Presidene Steve 
Blount. The roll was called, and 
the minutes of the previous meet- 
ing were read and approved. 

Bount reported that a Dixieland 
band had been obtained to play free 
of charge at the basketball games 
to help promote school spirit. Mem- 
bers of the band are: Jimmy 
Green, tuba; David Butler, clari- 
net; Jimmy Randell, trombone; 
Jack Gates, trumpet; Larry Fisher, 
drums. 

It was reported that $522.85 was 
collected from ticket sales to the 
performance of the Four Seasons. 
A discussion followed on the edi- 
torial which was published in the 
November 20, issue of the "Current 
Sauce" concerning the entertain- 
ment committee. J. O. Charrier 
pointed out the fact that the enter- 
tainment fund was originally set 
up to bring in one name band per 
semester. However, the committee 
had decided to bring in three 
groups in order to satisfy a greater 
percentage of the students. Char- 
rier pointed out that there was not 
enough time this fall to call a spe- 
cial all campus election to decide 
which group of entertainers the 
students wanted. The committee 
will have $1500 to use in the sp- 
ring for bringing in entertainment. 

Blount thanked the president 
of the freshman class, Butch 
Wiggins, and the freshman as- 
sociates for decorating the coli- 
seum for the Homecoming dance. 

Blount reported that there had 
been some question as to whether 
the council had been consulted in 
the formulation of the attendance 
regulations. 

Nick DeJean raised the question 
as to why students who had laun- 
dry pick up and deliver service re- 
ceived faster service than those 
who did not. Carolyn Thomas re- 
ported that there had been numer- 
ous complaints about the laundry 
losing the clothing that was sent 
to them. Dean Fulton reported 
that he could check into the mat- 
ter. 



I UKE THIS NEW MAN£ APP£QA£H, PfAH H0O£3£- " 



R. J. Ardoin raised the question 
as to what could be done about the 
ecessive amount of trash which is 
being thrown on our campus. Cal- 
bert Marcantel reported that the 
Associated Men's Students were 
working to obtain trash barrels 
which would be placed at different 
locations on the campus. Students 
are urged not to throw litter on 
the campus. 

J. O. Charrier reported that the 
election for MR. & MISS NSC 
would be held Tuesday, November 
24. There will be a dance from 3- 
5:30 in the student center in con- 
junction with the election. The fol- 
lowing council members will work 
at the polls: 

8- 9 Corley and Charrier 

9- 10 Ardoin and Gaspard 

10- 11 Harris and Thomas 

11- 12 Holley and Grunwall 

12- 1 Rhea and Carroll 

1- 2 Wallace and Branton 

2- 3 Wallace and Harris 

3- 4 Marcantel and Wallace 

4- 5 Rhea and DeJean 

5- 6 Methvin, Branton, and 

Brumble 

6- 7 Thomas and Charrier 
Carolyn Thomas moved that a 

dance be held December 5, from 
9:30-12 midnight following the 
basketball game. Second by R. J. 
Ardoin. Motion passed. 

Thomas raised the question as to 
when student directories would be 
off the press. Blount reported that 
he did not know the date, but they 
would be ready soon. 

There being no further business, 
Scotty Maxwell moved that the 
meeting be adjourned. Second by 
Nicky DeJean. Meeting adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Carolyn Thomas 
Secretary 



November 30, 1964 
The regular meeting of the 
Northwestern Student Council was 
called to order by President Steve 
Blount. The roll was called, and 
the minutes of the previous meet- 
ing were read and approved. 

Blount announced that the pre- 
sident of the junior class, junior 
men's representative, junior wo- 
men's representative, and all mem- 
bers of the council who are class- 
ified as juniors will meet with 
Dean Fulton to discuss the selec- 
tion of Who's Who In American 
Colleges and Universities. It was 
decided that the meeting would be 
held at 11 a.m., Tuesday, Decem- 
ber 1, in Dean Fulton's office. 

The following council members 
will work at the polls Tuesday, 
December 1: 

8- 9 — Walker, Charrier, and Corley 

9- 10 — Leabo, Harris, and Ardoin 

10- 11 — Thomas and DeJean 

11- 12 — Maxwell and DeJean 

12- 1 — Walker and Rhea 

1- 2 — Grunwall and Traigle 

2- 3 — Ardoin and Wallace 

3- 4 — Wallace and Ardoin 

4- 5 — Moore and Brumble 

5- 6 — Methvin and Marcantel 

6- 7 — Thomas and Charrier 
The Rhythm Dukes will play 

for the Wednesday dance which 
will be held in the student cen- 
ter. Council members working at 
the dance are Calbert Marcantel, 
Jim Leabo, R. J. Ardoin, Sarah 
Grunwall, Pat Holley, and Nick 
DeJean. 

Barbara Wallace asked if the 
council planned to advertise the 
performance of Richard and Jim. It 
was reported that ads would be 
run in the local papers. 

Patsy Gaspard reported that the 
record committee had met. This 
committee was appointed to in- 
vestigate and see if new albums 
were needed for the student cen- 
ter, and if so, how many. Gaspard 
turned over a list of record needs 
to Blount. It was suggested that 
the college join a record club so 
that the album collection in the 
student center might be kept up 
to date. 

Scotty Maxwell reported that 
a light was needed for the drive 
in front of Schieb Hall. A dis- 
cussion followed. Maxwell 
moved that a light be put in 
front of Schieb Hall. Second by 
Milton Rhea. Motion passed. 
Barbara Wallace suggested that 
the council send flowers to the 
funerals of the NSC students kill- 
ed in the auto collision. It was re- 
ported that a special college fund 
sends flowers on such occasions. 

Maxwell reported that a walk 
was needed between Schieb Hall 
and the walk behind Natchitoches 
High. Dean Fulton reported that 
this property does not belong to 
the college; however, he will 
check and see if any arrangements 
could be made. 

Betty Moore asked if any 
further progress had been made 
toward getting private lines for 
each room. It was reported that 
the telephone company had been 
contacted and asked to come out 
and make an estimate of the 
cost. 

Pasty Gaspard asked if anything 
could be done about the lines be- 
coming so crossed at night. It was 
reported that the school would 
check into obtaining more lines. 

J. O. Charrier pointed out that 
the council needed a regular office 
where materials could be stored 
and where the officers could have 
desks. It was suggested that the 
room adjoining the council meet- 
ing room be used for this purpose. 
Roy Corley reported that there 
had been a large number of 
called night classes and tests 
given by teachers when their 
class was unable to meet. It was 
reported that this would be 
brought to the attention of the 
academic deans. 

Jim Leabo asked if there was a 
state law which prohibited the cut- 
ting of freshman boy's hair. It was 
reported that there is no such law. 

There being no further business, 
Barbara Wallace moved that the 
meeting be adjourned. 
Carolyn Thomas 
Secretary 



LETTERS 
To The 
EDITOR 



Dear Sir: 

Let me congratulate you on 
your editorial in your last issue 
dealing with the Entertainment 
Committee. I am a member of that 
committee, and your editorial said 
exactly what I told the other com- 
mittee members at each of our 
meetings. Unfortunately I was 
voted down. 

I believe that in view of the fact 
that the constitutional amendment 
which the student body voted on 
and passed called for "big name 
entertainment" that nothing less 
than the biggest name entertain- 
ment we can afford should be 
hired. I also believe that since 
every student pays $1.00 per se- 
mester for this entertainment 
that the selections made by the 
committee should be of as wide 
enough variety to please as many 
students as possible. I realize that 
it is impossible to get every in- 
dividual student's favorite enter- 
tainer, but a wide enough variety 
can be hired to satisfy the student 
body as a whole. 

I am not suggesting that the 
committee hire "classical" or 
"high-c u 1 1 u r a 1" entertainment 
This committee was not set up for 
that purpose. Nor do I suggest that 
the committee adopt a "no rock 
and roll" policy. If we are going to 
be fair to everyone, we must re- 
cognize those who prefer rock and 
roll entertainment. But there is 
also a large number of students 
who prefer a higher grade of en- 
tertainment in the popular field. 
For instance I personnally know 
many students who would much 
rather have listened to Tony Ben- 
nett, Jack Jones, Henry Mancini, 
or The Brother's Four than either 
The Four Seasons, or the Brandy- 
wine Singers. These students have 
the same rights and priviledges as 
those who prefer The Four Sea- 
sons, etc. Entertainment on our 
campus is now big enough to war- 
rent variety and a certain amount 
of discresion. 

The Entertainment Committee 
should do some soul searching; 
it should reanalyze the responsi- 
bility it was chosen to fulfill, and 
as a member of this committee, I 
have voiced this many times. 

Nothing can be done about en- 
tertainment this semester, and 
there is little time or money left 
to work with for next semester; 
but the future is still before us, 
and unless something is done the 
committee may find itself faced 
with many repercussions from the 
NSC student body. And after all, 
who's paying for it? 

In the public interest, 
Wayne Meachum 



urrent Sauce 



ESTABLISHED 1914 



Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
scription $3 the year payable in advance. 



Member of the Associated CoUegiate Press 

Duffy Wan Editor-in-Chief 

Sharon Hillman Associate Editir 

Kenny Baiter News Editor 

Jerry Brill Sports Editjr 

Jean Wall Society Editor 

John Lewis Business Manager 

Linda Broughton .... Advertising Manager 

Jon Gibson staff Artist 

Roy G. Clark Faculty Adviser 

Editorial Staff: Mary Ellen Davis, Walley 
Hebert, Carolyn Brown. 



Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not refle.t 
the opinions of the student bodv or the 
administration and faculty of the college 



The Current Sauce prints the news im- 
partially. It supports what it believes to 
be right, and opposes what it believes to 
be wrcng, regardless. 



This paper is printed by the Graphic 
Arts Division of the Industrial Education 
Department of Northwestern 



Page € 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1964 



Demon High Scorer 




Currently leading the Demon Basketball team in scoring 
for the first three games is Kenny Arthur. Kenny has 
scored a total of 46 points and has scored in double fig- 
ures in all three games. He was the leading rebounder 
in the first game and tied for high-point man in the last 
game. 



NSC Hosts La. College 
Here Saturday Night 



The NSC Demons will try to con- 
tinue their ways here Saturday 
night as they play host to the La. 
College Wildcats. The game will be 
played in Prather Coliseum. 

The Demons currenty stand at 
3-0 with wins posted over South- 
eastern Oklahoma and Nicholls 
State. The Wildcats have posted an 
opening win over the Tulane Green 
Wave by a score of 86-74. 

Leading scorer for the Demons 
thus far has been Kenny Arthur. 
Kenny has scored a total of 46 
points in three games for an aver- 

Banquet Scheduled 
For NSC Athletes 

Athletic Director Jack Clayton 
has announced that the annual 
Northwestern football banquet is 
scheduled for Tuesday at 8 o'clock 
in St. Denis Dining Hall. 

The presentation of trophies and 
letter awards to football lettermen 
and cross-country participants will 
be made at the banquet. 

Those interested in attending 
may get their tickets from the 
Athletic Office in the Colisieum 
at a cost of $2 per ticket. 



576 Front St. Phone 5370 

BREWER'S 
Shoeland 

Fine Selection 
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Featuring 

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age of 15.3. Billy Ray and David 
Clark are tied for the teams high- 
est average with both players aver- 
aging 16 points a game. Sam Watts 
and Lester Lee are tied for se- 
cond in points scored with 39 each. 
This is good for a 13 point average. 
Tommy Stewart is leading the team 
in rebounds with a total of 29. He 
is followed by Sam Watts with 21. 

Other games the Demons will 
play during the week will be with 
Lamar Tech and Stephen F. Aus- 
tin. They will travel to Beaumont 
Monday night to battle the Cardi- 
nals and then return home to en- 
tertain the Lumberjacks on Wed- 
nesday. 

Lamar Tech will return to ac- 
tion this season with five return- 
ing lettermen. The team last year 
won their fourth straight South- 
land Conference title with a 7-1 
conference mark and averaged 
101.8 points a game in loop play. 
Their overall record was 19-6 and 
averaged 91.3 points per game. 



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Typewriters 

FOR RENT 

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STANDARDS 

These factory reconditioned 
machines may be bought on 
rental-purchase plan. 



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Printing & Office Supply 
124 St. Denis Phone 2935 



Improving Track 
Team Competing 
Today For GSC 

The NSC Cross-Country track 
team travels to La. Tech today to 
take part in the GSC Cross-Country 
track meet. Each school in the 
GSC will be represented in a 
course that will take them 3.8 
miles. 

Highlight of the meet will be 
the meeting of the Demon's fabu- 
lous Eddie Watt and Southwest- 
em's Malcomb Robinson. Both of 
these runners are figured to be 
fighting it out for the top spot. 

Since running for the Demons, 
Watt has not finished below first. 
He has run in four meets with 
other schools and has finished first 
in each of them. He also finished 
first in the New Orleans Turkey 
Day Classic. Watt was one of forty 
runners and covered the five mile 
course that ran through New Or- 
leans in 25:02. 

Also on the team are Tony Ward, 
Bob Dufalo, Nick Wright, Dalton 
Phelps, Jim Phifer, Tim Poston, 
and Franz Focke. The Cross-coun- 
try team's record now stands at 
3-3, with all three wins coming 
in their last three outings. 



Garth To Serve 
On NSF Panel 

Dr. Richard E. Garth, associate 
professor of biology at Northwest- 
ern State College, has been invited 
to serve on an evaluation panel for 
the National Science Foundation 
in San Francisco, December 3 and 
4. 

The panel will evaluate applica- 
tion proposals for grants submit- 
ted to the undergraduate research 
participation program of NSF. 

Dr. Garth served on the staff of 

NSF last year while on a leave of 
absence from NSC. 



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Natchitoches 






Now that we have finally reach- 
ed the end of Demon football for 
the year 1964, I thought that it 
might be appropriate to publish 
the final statistics. NSC ended up 
with 1879 net yards rushing com- 
pared to a total of 1563 yards 
rushing for their opponents. In 
the passing department, the De- 
mons collected 1121 yards while 
giving up 803. This gives North- 
western a total of 3000 yards 
gained while giving up 2373. 
Northwestern averaged 333.3 yards 
per game. Point wise, the Demons 
scored 206 points, or an average 
of 22.9 points per ball game. They 
gave up a total of 164 points, lead- 
ing the GSC in both of those de- 
partments. All of this adds up to 
give the Demons a 4-5 overall rec- 
ord, their second straight year be- 
low the .500 mark. 

In the individual statistics, 
James Aymond led all the backs 
average wise as he picked up 361 
yards on only 33 carries for a 10.9 
yards per carry average. The lead- 
ing ground gainer was Claude Pat- 
rick who picked up 406 yards in 
82 carries for an average of 4.8. 
The Demons had six backs who 
averaged over five yards per car- 
ry. 

In the passing department, Don 
Beasley proved to be the leading 
passer with 38 completions in 85 
attempts and 655 yards. This was 
good for five TD's and a .447 aver- 
age. Donnie Carroll threw the ball 
63 times and completed 29 of them 
for 453 yards and also five touch- 
downs. The leading receivers were 



James Aymond and Dick Reding. 
Aymond was on the receiving end 
of 15 passes for 260 yards and two 
TD's while Reding caught 14 pass- 
es for 281 yards and four TD's. 
The leading pass interceptor was 
Al Dodd who stole four passes for 
100 yards. Al Moreau was the only 
player to run an intercepted pass 
back for a touchdown. 

Al Dodd led the club in both 
punt and kickoff returns. Al ran 
back 12 punts for 171 yards with 
his longest return at 62 yards and 
a TD. He ran back 10 kickoffs for 
220 yards with his longest return 
at 64 yards. 

Leading scorer for the Demons 
was Jimmy Scott and his Golden 
Toe. Scott kicked 20 extra points 
and four field goals for a total of 
32 points. 



Last weeks football predictions 
turned out to be like the first of 
the year as this column ended up 
with an eight and two week. This 
was good for another .800 week. 
Those games not predicted cor- 
rectly were once again upsets. One 
of the teams was Ohio State. Not 
only did the Buckeyes spoil their 
chance for a Rose Bowl bid, but 
they also ruined my bid for a 
.900 week. The other upset was 
Florida State over Florida. Noth- 
ing needs to be said about this 
game as it brings nothing but tears 
to the forecaster. The season rec- 
ord now stands at 69-19-3. This 
is good enough to be a .758 aver- 
age, which is nothing to be a- 
shamed of. 



Intramural Schedule 1964-65 



Gymnastics 

Badminton 

Paddleball 

Basketball 

Free Throw 

Tennis 

Softball 

Track and Field 
Swimming 



ENTRY DEADLINE 
January 11 
February 8 
February 15 
March 1 
March 29 
April 26 
April 26 
May 10 
May 17 



PLAY BEGINS 
January 14 
February 11 
February 18 
March 4 
April 1 
April 29 
April 29 
May 13 
May 20 



Malts 



Frosted Drinks 
Hamburgers 
Southern Maid Do-Nuts 



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J 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Demons Take First Three Games 
In Basketball Competition Here 



Page 5 



Demons Score Win In Opener 

NSC christened the new Coli- 
seum on the right foot last Friday 
as they downed Southeastern Ok- 
lahoma by a score of 62-53. It was 
a sweet victory for the Demons as 
last years outings between the two 
clubs still hung in the air. The Sav- 
ages knocked off the Demons in 
their first two outings last year by 
scores of 89-79 and 92-70. 

It was the Demons all the way as 
the Oklahomians trailed most of 
the game, coming only within two 
points in the last part of the first 
half. From then on it was all De- 
mons as they enjoyed a 32-22 first 
half lead. 

Four of the Demon starters end- 
ed up in double figures. Leading 
scorer was big Sam Watts who end- 
ed up with 19. He was followed by 
David Clark who scored 16. Lester 
Lee and Kenny Arthur ended the 
game with 14 and 13 points respec- 
tively. Leading rebounder was Ken- 
ny Arthur with 12. 

Roundballers Make If Two 

The Southeastern Oklahoma Sav- 
ages were handed their second 



straight defeat at the hands of a 
powerful group of Demons by a 
score of 59-46. This ran the Demons 
record to 2-0. 

Scoring leader for this game was 
Billy Ray, substitute for David 
Clark who was out with an injured 
wrist. Ray hit on seven of 15 field 
goal attempts and eight of nine 
free throws for a total of 22 points. 
Also in double figures was Kenny 
Arthur who ended with 16 points. 

Leading rebounder for the De- 
mons was Tommy Stewart who end- 
ed up with 14 rebounds for the con- 
test. 

Arthur, Lee Spark Win 

The NSC Demons continued to 
roll as they downed the Nicholls 
Colonels by a score of 72-62. The 
win moved the Demons to 3-0 while 
the Colonels dropped to 1-3. 

The Demons led by as much as 
eleven points late in the second 
half until Nicholls came up with a 
full court press. They crept within 
one point until the Demons were 
able to gain their winning stride. 



"Snow Scene," with Janie Arm- 
strong, Margaret Carroll, Mary 
Gilson, Mary Lawless, Gwen Mar- 
ler, Maxine Mifflin, Betty Mor- 
gan, and Sissy Smith; "Santa's 
Helpers," by Julia Mahoney, Peg- 
gy Martin, and Ramona Reynolds; 
and "Fireworks," danced by en- 
semble. 



PE Department Holds Dance Concert 
In Fine Arts Auditorium Tonight 

The Northwestern Health and 
Physical Education Department 
will present its first dance concert 
tonight. The program will include 
original choreography by Stina 
Hellberg, graduate student from 
Finland. 

The concert will be open to the 
pubic and it will begin at 8 p.m. 
in the Fine Arts Auditorium. No 
admission will be charged. 

Since the program will be given 
before the annual Natchitoches 
Christmas Festival, a special suite 
of dances is included as a tribute 
to the occasion. 

The concert will open with 
"Movement" which will be cho- 
reographed and danced by Stina 
Hellberg. Other numbers which 
will be presented in the program 
are "Teenagers," danced by Joan 
Denham, Wavelyn Murray, Ra- 
mona Reynolds, and Judy Winn; 
"Three German Dances," by Jane 
Plum; "Circus," by Colleen Nel- 
ken, Jane Plum, and Peggy Mar- 
tin; "Forgotten Dreams," by Miss 
Hellberg; and "Sacrifice," by Hell- 
berg, Julia Mahoney, Peggy Mar- 
tin, and Ramona Reynolds. 

As a tribute to the annual Nat- 
chitoches Christmas Festival, 
these numbers will be presented; 
"Juldancer," by Carol Adkins, 
Donnie Carroll, Ricky Evans, 
Douglas Giles, Phylis Guidry, 
Stina Hellberg, Barbara Lloyd, 
Julia Mahoney, Peggy Martin, 
Wavelyn Murray, Steve Nehring, 
Paul Nicholos, Eugene Noel, Ra- 
mona Reynolds, and Walter Wall; 



Joyce Williams To Speak 
To Home Economics Classes 

Mrs. Joyce O. Williams, consum- 
er specialist with Food and Drug 
Administration, Department of 
Health, Education, and Welfare, 
headquartered in New Orleans, will 
speak to Northwestern home man- 
agement, foods and nutrition class- 
es in the Living Room of the Home 
Economics Building at 8 a. m. and 
at 9 a. m. Wednesday, Dec. 9. 

Mrs. Williams, a native of Vin- 
ton, is a 1951 home economics 
graduate of NSC and holds the 
master's degree from LSU in foods 
and nutrition. She has served as re- 
search nutritionist at Tulane Med- 
ical School and for the Department 
of Obstetrics and Gynecology at 
the John Sealy Hospital in Galves- 
ton, Texas. 

Topic of discussion for the two 
sessions will be "FDA: Its Signi- 
ficance to the Consumer." A re- 
port on the research being conduct- 
ed by FDA that will be of particu- 
lar interest to the Homemaker will 
also be given by Mrs. Williams. 

Both sessions are open to the 
public. 



Shop Early at Glovers Gift Shop 

Gifts For All Occassions 
We Gift Wrap and Mail 
phone 3142 



Students ! ! 

Why not assure that the next visit of parents or 
friends is a memorable one in all respects? 

El Camino Real Motel 



Highway 6 West 



Phone 4426 



I Northwestern led the score most of 
the way and enjoyed a slim 34-33 

1 lead at halftime. 

The Demons showed a fine bal- 
anced offense as five players scor- 
ed in double figures. Leading the 
way was Lester Lee and Kenny Ar- 
thur who each chalked up 17 points 
with Arthur hitting on 15 of his in 
the second half. Big Sam Watts 
netted 13 and Tommy Stewart and 
Billy Ray hitting 11 and 10 respec- 
tively. 

Leading rebounder for NSC was 
Tommy Stewart who hauled in 
nine. 



PASSING IN REVIEW 



Corwyn Aldredge 

Corwyn Aldredge 
Drafted By Both 
Pro Leagues 

Corwyn Aldredge, a senior end 
for the Demons from St. Francis- 
ville, was included in both the 
draft selections of the National 
Football League and the American 
Footbal League. 

Aldredge was the sixth round 
choice of the Cleveland Browns 
of the NFL and was the fifth 
choice of the AFL's Boston Pa- 
triots. 

Corwyn was injured the last 
half of the season and was held 
out of action but was very impres- 
sive in early games for the De- 
mons. 

Aldredge weighs in at 235 
pounds and was a four sports let- 
terman in high school. 





From ttie first 
ray of light, 
This one day 
is alive. 
This one day 
is so full, 
Vou should 
capture it all. 



For the photographic record of yonr 
wedding, the services of a qualified 
professional photographer are essen- 
tial. Call us today, won't you? 

John C. Guillet 

PHOTOGRAPHY 
403 Second Street 
Ph. 2381 Natchitoches 




By Ernie Harris 



The Black Knights will be mar- 
ching in the Christmas parade this 
Saturday in down-town Natchito- 
ches. The Drill Team from Sam 
Houston will be marching in this 
parade also. I am sure that the 
Black Knights will give another 
sterling performance. The "side- 
throw" will be used again, and it 
will certainly be worth the time 
to go down and see our Knights 
in action. 

The ROTC will have a float en- 
tered in this parade, and it will be 
a steamboat. Clinton Marks is in 
charge of this project, and Clinton 
is also in charge of personnel duty 
assignments to the respective com- 
panies. All of the cadets have been 
working on the float for the past 
week. The float will be second in 
the parade. 

I saw an interesting map in the 
Armory yesterday afternoon,' 
I took a closer look at it, and it 
was a map showing where all the 
graduates of the ROTC were sta- 
tioned after they received their 
commissions. Contrary to popular 
belief, not everyone is sent to Viet 



Nam after getting his commission. 

Competition seems to be getting 
tougher for CADET OF THE 
WEEK. Cadet Sgt. Paul E. Shaw 
was chosen for CADET OF THE 
WEEK for the ROTC this time 
after being in a tie with four other 
cadets. Paul was selected on his 
overall military bearing. Paul is a 
2-2, who is majoring in Wildlife 
Management, and hails from Lees- 
ville. Cadet Sgt. Shaw has already 
had a tour of duty with the U.S. 
Marine Corps. Paul is presently 
serving with Headquarters Com- 
pany as Squad Leader of the 1st 
Platoon. 



(ACP)— Perhaps the staff mem- 
bers of the TORCH, Whittenberg 
University, Springfield, Ohio were 
feeling a monetary pinch when 
they wrote: 

In 1886 the charge for board at 
Whittenberg was $1.90 per week 
for those who did not drink coffee 
or tea. The student who wished 
to enjoy the privilege of drinking 
beverages paid 10 cents more per 
week. 



PENNYLAND 

1300 Washington Across From Peoples Motor Co. 

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 
8 A.M. -12 P.M. 

Free Transportation To And From 
The College - 8 A.M. - 11 P.M. 

SIX POOL TABLES 
(Brunswick, Gold Crown) 

TWO SNOOKER TABLES 
(Brunswick, Gold Crown) 

Shuffle Board - Domino Tables 
Moon Tables - Bowling Tables 

Shooting Gallery 
Free Prize on Pin Ball Machine 



SNACK BAR -AIR CONDITIONED 

ENTERTAINMENT FOR ALL 
MEN - LADIES - CHILDREN 

All NSC Lady Students Play FREE 

For Fun - Relaxation - Pleasure 
Visit PENNYLAND 




THE CURRENT SAiJCE 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1964 



NSC Orchestra Will Present Concert 
Shell, Radford Will Be Soloists 

The Northwestern Symphony 
Orchestra, under the direction of 
Dr. Joseph Carlucci, will present 
two concerts next week, one in the 
new Winnfield High School Audi- 
torium on December 10 at 8:00 
p. m. Featured as piano soloists 
with the orchestra will be Mari- 
lyn Frances Shell and Wanda Rad- 
ford. 

Miss Shell is currently in her 



Wavelyn Murray, a physical education and dance major 
from Leesviile, will be featured as the "Snowflake" danc- 
er in the annual Christmas presentation of the Contemp- 
orary Dancers tonight in the Fine Arts Auditorium at 
8 p.m. 



Jackie Long Named 
Best Pledge By 
Sigma Kappa 

Sigma Kappa elected Jackie Long 
as best pledge for the preceeding 
week. She was presented a long 
stem red rose. 

The pledges are planning a 
party with several surprises for 
the actives. All Sigma Kappas are 
helping with the elabrate decora- 
tions which are popping up every- 
where. With all their hard work, 
they're trying to make this a 
Christmas to remember. 



(ACP)— Muses THE OPTIMIST, 
Abilene Christain College, Abi- 
lene, Tex. The only perfect weath- 
er is bed. 



Chief im Serving 
As Chairmen Ql 
Security Meeting 

James K. Lee, chief of campus 
security at Northwestern, will ser- 
ve as chairman of a meeting of 
campus security officers of the col- 
leges and universities under the 
jurisdiction of the State Board of 
Education, December 9. 

The meeting, which will be in the 
Capitol in Baton Rouge, will be for 
the purpose of discussing mutual 
problems of campus security offi- 
cers. 



Conference Held 
On Financial Aid 
For Students 

A guidance conference concern- 
ing financial aid to college students 
was conducted on the Northwestern 
State College campus Thursday. 
The conference, which was held in 
the Little Theatre of the Fine Arts 
Building, was sponsored by the 
Northwestern office of Student Re- 
lations. 

Attending the conference were 
high school principals and counse- 
lors from the northern portion of 
the state. Representatives from 
five northern Louisiana colleges 
were also in attendance. The five 
present were Louisiana Tech, Nor- 
theast State, Centenary College, 
Louisiana College, and LSU at 
Alexandria. 

The purpose of the conference 
was to provide those present with 
information concerning financial 
aid to education. 

The conference began with the 
registration at 9 a. m. and continu- 
ed throughout the day. Talks were 
given on Problems of High School 
Counselors relative to financial aid 
for graduating seniors, costs of at- 
tending college, scholarships, stu- 
dent employment, and loan pro- 
grams. 



Campus Women 
Plan Dinner 

The Campus Women's Club 
Christmas Dinner will be held 
December 10 at 7 p.m. at the Nat 
chitoches Country Club. Tickets 
are $1.75 each. If no one calls you 
about tickets, you may call Mrs. 
W. E. Timon at 4302 or Mrs. Rus 
sell Whittington at 6230 for tick 
I ets. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
SERVICES 
Old Lemee House 
Jefferson St. 
Every Sunday 11:00 A M. 
All are welcome 




For Good 
Hair Coloring 
Shaping 
Styling 



visit 

TRESSIES 
Beauty Salon 

in 

East Natchitoches 
Call 4536 

Closed Mondays 
See 

Tressie - Elsie - Irma 
Jean - Linda 

201 EAST Third Street 
Across from Warrens Mkt. 



MAKE 

YOUR 

FAMILY 

AT HOME 
Away From Home. 




SHAMROCK MOTEL 



Highway 1 South 



Phone 5566 




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Ladies and Gents Expansion Watch Bands at V2 price 

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eighth year of piano study with 
Mrs. Clarise Lohman of Winnfield 
and Shreveport. She is a sophomore 
at Winnfield High School, where 
she has been a member of the Band 
for five years, is piano and organ 
accompanist for the Junior and 
Youth Choirs of the Winnfield 
First Methodist Church, and serves 
as assistant organist for the Chan- 
cel Choir at the same church. 
For several years she has serv- 
ed as pianist for meetings of ci- 
vic organizations and for numer- 
ous school and community pro- 
grams. For her appearance with 
the Northwestern Symphony, 
Miss Shell will perform the first 
movement from the Piano Con- 
certo in D major by Joseph Hay- 
dn. 

Miss Radford is a senior piano 
major at NSC and a student of Dr. 
Paul Torgrimson. She graduated 
from Mansfield High School, where 
she was active in the Band and 
studied piano with Mrs. Shirley 
Williams. She has been a member 
of the NSC Band and Orchestra and 
served as head majorette for the 
Demon Band this fall. Miss Rad- 
ford will perform the first move- 
ment of the Piano Concerto No. 2 
by Rachmaninoff with the NSC Or- 
chestra next week. 

The orchestral portion of the 
program will include "Light Cav- 
alry Overture," by Von Suppe, 
"Symphony No. 5 in B flat," by 
Schubert, " Peasant's Song," by 
Grieg, "When Johnny Comes Mar- 
ching Home," in a special arrange- 
ment for string instruments, "Wal- 
tz from the 'Sleeping Beauty' Bal- 
let," by Tschaikowsky, "Sleigh 
Ride," and "Plink, Plank, Plunk," 
by Leroy Anderson. There is no 
charge for either program and the 
public is cordially invited to 
attend. 



Music Department 
Promoted By N ASM 

Northwestern was promoted to 
full membership in the National 
Association of Schools of Music 
November 27 at the 40th Annual 
Meeting of the Association. Dr. 
Joseph B. Carlucci, head of the 
Department of Music, represented 
the school at the meeting at the 
Statler-Hilton Hotel, St. Louis, 
Missouri. 

The curricula which have been 
approved for Northwestern lead to 
the degrees Bachelor of Music in 
Applied Music, Bachelor of Music 
Education, and Master of Music in 
Education. 

Northwestern became an associ- 
ate member of NASM at the annual 
meeting in 1961 and received the 
report of its being granted full 
membership at the opening session 
of the St. Louis meeting. 

Membership of the Association 
has included 281 universities, col- 
leges and conservatories in the 
United States. Nine new schools 
were admitted to membership at 
this meeting, and ten schools were 
promoted from associate to full 
membership. 

The NASM is designated by the 
National Commission on Accredit- 
ing as the responsible agency for 
the accrediation of music degree 
curricula and the work of the As- 
sociation has an important bearing 
on the continual development of 
music in America. 



(ACP)— THE DAILY REVILLE, 
Louisiana State University, Baton 
Rouge, took stock of crowded con- 
ditions and asked: 

Instead of taking undergraduate 
cars off campus, why not remove 
some of the undergraduates? 




St. Denis 



Phone 6390 



BURLINGTON GOLD CUP!' 

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blend of 75% Orion* Acrylic and 25% Nylon .. . 
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Coordinate them with sportswear. One size fits 
all. The cost? only $^50 



•DuPont Trademark 



HUGHES' 
Men's Dept. 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 




As a salute to the Natchitoches Christmas Festival of 
Lights, Gwen Marler as the Candy Cane and Ramona Rey- 
nolds as the Bell, will perform in the annual winter recital 
of the Northwestern Contemporary Dancers. Both are 
members of the organization, Miss Reynolds the vice- 
president. 



NSC Music Groups 
To Give Concert 

Three musical organizations from 
the Northwestern Department of 
Music will present a special con- 
cert in the sanctuary of the First 
Baptist Church of Natchitoches on 
December 8 at 8 p. m. Featured 
will be organist, Barney Tiller, in- 
structor of Music at NSC, along 
with the Northwestern String En- 
semble, String Orchestra and Chor- 
als. 

The Northwestern String En- 
semble, directed by Mr. John Mal- 
tese, assistant professor of string 
instruments, will open the program 
with a performance of the Concer- 
to Grosso in G minor, Op. 6, No.8, 
also known as the "Christmas Con- 
certo", by Arcangelo Corelli. Mr. 
Tiller, accompanied by the North- 
western String Orchestra under 
the direction of Dr. Joseph Carluc- 
ci, will then perform an organ con- 
certo by George Frederick Handel. 
The concert will conclude with Ko- 
daly's "Missa Brevis", sung by the 
Northwestern Chorale under the 
direction of Dr. Gordon Flood. Ap- 
pearing as soloist in the Kodaly 
work will be tenor Ronald Alexan- 
der, a senior music major from Sh- 
reveport. 

There will be no admission char- 
ge, and the public is cordially in- 
vited to attend. 



Andelson Speaks 
To Banquet Group 

Dr. Robert V. Andelson, assis- 
tant professor of government and 
philosophy at Northwestern, add- 
ressed the 25th anniverstry ban- 
quet of the St. Louis, Missouri, 
extension of the Henry George 
School of Social Science, Nov. 30. 

The Henry George School is a 
non-profit, non-sectarian, non-polit- 
ical educational institute, charter- 
ed by the University of the State 
of New York for the purpose of 
conducting adult education classes 
in fundamental economics and 
social philosophy. It has 23 exten- 
sions throughout the United States 
and Canada, together with sister 
schools in eight foreign countries. 
Dr. Andelson served as Executive 
Director of the San Diego, Califor- 
nia, extension from 1959-61. 

Henry George is recognized by 
many as America's most outstand- 
ing economic thinker. Author of 
eight major works, including the 
all-time best seller on economics, 
"Progress and Poverty," which has 
been translated into nearly every 
civilized language, George deeply 
influenced the thought of many 
famous statesmen and philosoph- 
ers. Basing his work on classical 
political economy, he avoided the 
ideas of socialism. 



LETTERS 

Mr. Duffy Wall 
Editor-in-Chief 
NSC Current Sauce 
Dear Editor: 

In recent years, the appearance 
of our campus has been improved 
by the erection of new and modern 
buildings. One notices and approv- 
es of the proposed facilities which 
will soon be built and which will 
be a credit to Northwestern. 

We are wondering why there 
seem to be no plans for a new 
Women's Gymnasium. The present 
structure was built in 1922. Since 
that time, the present Natchitoch- 
es High School Gym was built for 
the men, the present Men's Gym 
erected, and now there is a col- 
iseum. 

We are proud of Northwestern's 
progress and feel that we are part 
of it. As physical education maj- 
ors, our ranks have grown through 
the years so that there are now 
seventy-five of us who use the 
gym daily. 

The enrollment for women on 
campus is presently 1,300. The 
facilities of the women's gym are 
used by several hundred girls 
every day. The dressing room has 
36 lockers, 4 shower stalls, and 
often the ceiling and walls shake 
when a group plays in the upstairs 
gym. 

We feel that the sight of the 
women's gym on the outskirts of 
our campus shows lack of progress 
in comparison to the development 
of the college as a whole. 

Don't misunderstand us!!! We 
really love our chosen profession, 
our friends, and our teachers here 
at NSC. In fact, we're rather at- 
tached to the "ole gym," but we 
find that inadequate facilities 
hurt our program and limit oppor- 
tunities. 

Sincerely, 

Kate Thibodeaux, President 
Physical Education Majors 
Club for Women 



Page 7 



The Running Robe 

By Robin Butler 



Pie™ Workshop 
Being Offered By 
Mr, Walter Robert 

Mr. Walter Robert, artist teach- 
er at the Indiana University School 
of Music, is offering a special 
Piano Workshop in the Northwest- 
ern Department of Music today 
and tomorrow. Hundreds of not- 
ices were sent to piano teachers 
in the states of Louisiana and 
Arkansas, and a number attended 
when the workshop got under way 
today. 

There were two morning sess- 
ions, running from 9 a.m. to 12 
noon and two in the afternoon, 
from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Topics cov- 
ered included: Practicing the 
Piano, Piano Technique, Accom- 
panying, and Piano Literature. 
Saturday morning from 9 a.m. to 
12 noon will be devoted to a Mas- 
ter Class session with selected 



AWS Plans Reception 

The Annual AWS Christmas At 
Home Reception will be held Dec- 
ember 13 in the drawing room of 
Varnado Hall from 3 to 5 p.m. 
Each girls' dorm will dress three 
dolls in accordance with the 
theme, "Christmas at Home," and 
these dolls will be placed on dis- 
play in the drawing room. The 
dolls are to be distributed to 
needy children at the Jaycee's 
Christmas Tree. 



Natchitoches 
Laundromat 

936 College Avenue 

CONVENIENT TO 
ALL STUDENT? 

Open 24 hours a day 
7 days a week 



P re-Christmas Sale on Pictures 

1 8x10 Plus 16 Wallets 7.00 

1 5x7 Plus 8 Wallets 4.75 

3 8x10 Plus 8 Wallets 14.75 

1 8x10 3 5x7 Plus 8 Wallets 16.00 

GOOD UNTIL DECEMBER 11, 1964 



UHRBACH'S STUDIO 

(Your Potpourri Photographer) 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 

NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 
Phones — 5556 — 5557 



Amid the forests of Mount Olym- 
pus there lived a young maiden 
named Madrasus. Her chief aim in 
life was to care for her beloved — 
the teenagers of earth. Through 
her plotting and scheming such 
songs as "Who cooked Zeus' 
Goose" and books like Catcher in 
the Ambrosia came into being. 

Hers was a happy world; her 
days spent reclining by a brook, 
thinking of countless ways in 
which she could fulfill her duties 
as the teenagers' guardian. 

One day, as Madrasus sat against 
a tree conversing with the bub- 
bling waters, a young hunter ap- 
peared before her. Now, Madrasus 
had seen many hunters, for they 
roamed the forest endlessly, but 
never had she beheld the perfect 
man such as this huntsman was. 
Instantly the arrows of Cupid 
pierced her heart — love at first 
sight. Of course, little did Madra- 
sus know that this boy was actual- 
ly the ruler of the gods, the great 
Zeus in disguise. While this old 
rogue was chasing a deer through 
the forest, he had seen the Maid- 
en. Her beauty, although it was 
detracted from by her bobby sox 
and loafers with her goddess 
gown, entranced him and he de- 
cided to make his play. 

Naturally, these two began 
talking, and soon they were in 
love. Zeus told Madrasus that 
he couldn't be with her very of- 
ten, but she understood that a 
hunter must travel far and wide 
to make his living. So they be- 
gan to meet; sometimes it would 
be weeks before they saw each 
other, but the maiden was al- 
ways waiting, and Zeus never 
failed to come again. 
Meanwhile, in the palace of the 
gods, Hera began to realize there 
was something strange going on. 
Her husband would sit for hours 
on end simply staring into space, 
yet never uttering a word. When 
she spoke to him, it was a sharp 
answer she received. And then 
suddenly, Zeus would be gone, with 
never a word of his destination. 

Now, Hera had many virtues, bu + 
patience and understanding were 
not among them. Instantly she be- 
lieved there was another woman. 

The next time Zeus left the 
mount Hera one of her parrots, 
Peek-a-boo, to follow him and re- 
port what happened. 

When Peek-a-boo returned 
with the truth, Hera nearly had 



a fit. At Zeus' return she met 
him at the door with a ranting 
and raving that nearly felled the 
castle. Zeus begged her forgive- 
ness but pleaded for one last 
visit to Madrasus. Hera loved her 
husband so she agreed. 
Later that week Zeus returned 
to the forest and Madrasus. He told 
her everything: how he had met 
her, who he was, and why he could 
never see her again. 

As Madrasus began to cry, Zeus 
brought forth the most gorgeous 
robe ever to be woven. It was of 
so many fine and glorious colors 
interwoven that, at the sight of it, 
Madrasus stopped her whining. 

Zeus said that this was to be her 
memory of him and that he knew 
her heart would slowly heal. 

But, alas, although Madrasus 
wore her robe and became 
known for those gorgeous colors, 
nothing could fil the emptiness 
inside her. 

Madrasus' care for the teen- 
agers began to dwindle, and soon 
juvenile delinquency began to 
spread. Finally a group of good 
teens decided to visit Madrasus 
nnd find out what was wrong. 

But when they reached her 
home she wasn't to be found. They 
searched everywhere looking for 
their guardian. Eventually their 
search brought them to the brook, 
and there on the surface floated 
the beautiful robe Zeus had pre- 
sented Madrasus. However, instead 
of being perfectly blocked as be- 
fore, the colors had run together, 
and in her death Madrasus had 
given teenagers the best gift possi- 
ble, an object found in every teen 
wardrobe, the love of the college 
kids, the material named for Mad- 
rasus — bleeding madras. 



P E P L E S 

HARDWARE FURNITURE 
GIFTS 

Phone 2512 



students performing for Mr. Rob 
ert's criticisms. 

All interested piano teachers 
and students are invited to attend 
the remaining sessions without 
charge. For further information 
contact Dr. Joseph Carlucci, head 
of the NSC Music Department. 




The Perfect Gift For Men. . . 

MAX FACTOR'S New Line, including: 
GENTLEMEN'S COLOGNE 
GENTLEMEN'S AFTER SHAVE LOTION 
GENTLEMEN'S PRE-SHAVE LOTION 
GENTLEMEN'S DEODORANT COLOGNE 

plus the MAX FACTOR "SIGNATURE" line for men 



See these and other gifts at 



McCLUNG DRUG CO. 

Serving Natchitoches and NSC Since 1891 
Corner Front & Church Sts. Phone 2461 

FREE DELIVERY TO ALL COLLEGE DORMS 



Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1964 



Eliza And Burtonius 



By Joe Landrum 

Many centuries ago before man 
appeared in the wilds of North 
Louisiana, a region of virgin for- 
ests and creatures of quite singu- 
lar appearance and behavior, the 
gods of high Olympia deemed it 
necessary to establish law and or- 
der in this region, known as Ki- 

satchius. 

When the gods first created the 
little kingdom which was entirely 
inhabited by wild animals, peace 
and happiness prevailed. The 
creatures saw a new found freedom 
in their surroundings and all went 
along very well. Artemis saw to it 
that a temple was erected in her 
honor, which was called the Gar- 
den of the Gods and was the focal 
point of all activity of the forest. 

We must understand that at 
this time, man did not exist and 
all animals were considered 
equal. They worshipped in the 
temple and lived their lives 
much as cave men did at a later 
date. So here in the forest we 
find a civilization composed of 
many different species of ani- 
mals, the most prominent being 
swine. 

These swine ran in herds, there 
being a central hedr of which Pig- 
malion, a born leader was the head. 
Whenever there was trouble of 
any consequence in the forest, Pig- 
malion saw to it that the trouble 
makers were ousted. Peace and 
harmony reigned in the little 
"world" for many years. 

With the passing of time, the 
animals began to develop in- 
tellect and insight into their 
daily problems. They had adapt- 
ed to their environment and 
seemed to grow more culturally 
minded every day. With the 
broadening of their horizons, a 
feeling of superiority developed 
among certain groups. 

Our feathered friends organized 
the John Bird Society, which aim- 
ed to prevent the infiltration of 
outsiders. Kisatchius became a cul- 
ture center all in itself. Needless 
to say, the gods were not pleased 
by this behavior, because it meant 
that the temples were either ne- 
glected or used only for political 
caucuses. 

The animals began to lose 
their faith in the omnipotence 
of the gods and some even dared 
to speak out against them. The 
idea of survival of the fittest 
began to lose its significance 
and there was some talk of or- 
ganizing armed forces in order 
to protect the citizens. 
At first thinking that their be- 
havior was harmless, Artemis soon 
realized that things were getting 
entirely out of hand, especially 
when her own significance waned. 
Besides rejecting authority, the 
animals began to quarrel among 
themselves. In spite of the efforts 
of the John Bird Society, a few 
black sheep strayed in, and be- 
came furiously indignant when 
they were not accepted. 

Also the local pack of wolves 
began to incite riots, sit-in strikes 
and what have you, in an effort 
to gain equal rights for their 
cousins, the red foxes, who were 
also constantly discriminated 



COMMUNITY 
CLEANERS 

Specialists In Nations 
Finest Dry Cleaning 

Professional Shirt 
Laundry 

Phone 2229 
103 Second Street 



against because of their color. 
Soon, fighting on a large scale 
began to break out. Artemis 
meant to put this political strife 
to an end at once. 
For lack of a better idea, Zeus 
hurled a few thunderbolts at the 
forest and the rains began to de- 
scend. For forty days and forty 
nights it poured down rain and the 
animals ran helter-skelter in search 
of shelter. After several weeks, the 
Garden of the Gods lay in ruins. 
Some of the more practical ani- 
mals, led by the Great Bear named 
Nola, constructed an ark, which 
went down in history as Nola's 
Ark. This saved a small majority 
of the population, but they lived 
only to meet a sadder fate. 

Artemis had finally decided 
on a solution. She sent a super- 
ior creature of the species homo 
sapien to rule over the forest 
and totalitarianize it. This char- 
acter's name was Louis and he 
brought his wife, Anania, along. 
As for the animals, they were 
made to walk on all four feet and 
bow down to the demands of Louis. 
Their power of speech was taken 
away, but many of them could still 
make noises such as groans, grunts, 
and chirps, thus forever telling the 
sad tale of the ruination of their 
society. 

Pigmalion was perhaps the most 
humiliated of all because his tail 
and long trunk were chopped off, 
giving him a most ridiculous ap- 
pearance in spite of his large size. 
Today he still disgustedly mutters, 
"Oink, oink." Translated, this 
means "Treason does not pay." 

Louis and Anania, in the course 
of many years, propagated a whole 
new race of men. Their story of 
how the government of the gods 
was finally overthrown is another 
one though. 



Placement Office Interviews 

Mr. Vernon Haynes, director of 
personnel for the Jefferson Par- 
ish Schools, will be in the Place- 
ment Office Thursday to interview 
prospective teachers. 

He will be looking for teachers 
in all categories and interviews 
will be every 15 minutes. Onyone 
interested in talking to Mr. Haynes 
should stop by the Placement Of- 
fice and make an appointment. 



CANE THEATRE 

Natchitoches, La. Phone 2922 



Starts Friday 




UCKNIC010B* • lECHHISCOPE'lfe^j^ 



Wednesday — Thursday 



Bebbie 

Reynolds f 

r 



MySix 

Loves" 



TlCHmCOLOff 



Edward C. Greco 
Is Seminar Speaker 

Edward C. Greco, senior re- 
search associate of the Research 
Department of United Gas Corpor- 
ation, Shreveport will be speaker 
for a seminar sponsored by the 
Department of Microbiology at 
Northwestern Wednesday at 7 p.m. 
in Room 108 of Williamson Hall. 
Topic for the seminar will be "Cor- 
rosion of Metals by Micro-Organ- 
isms". 

Greco, an NSC graduate, is past 
president of the Second Interna- 
tional Congress on Metallic Cor- 
rosion. He is listed in American 
Men of Science, Chemical Who's 
Who, and Leaders in American 
Scinece. In 1962, Greco was ap- 
pointed head of a delegation of 
five American scientists and engi- 
neers who toured Russia under the 
sponsorship of the National Asso- 
ciation of Corrosion Engineers. 

He has published many techni- 
cal papers in the field of chemis- 
try, corrosion, and engineering and 
contributed chapters to several 
technical books. Also a registered 
engineer, Greco was awarded the 
honorary doctor of science degree 
by Centenary College for outstand- 
ing contributions to science and 
science education in Louisiana. 



Coed Kills Deer 
During Holidays 

There are reports that some of 
the men on campus were most suc- 
cessful during the Thanksgiving 
holidays in killing their quota of 
deer, but they were not the only 
ones having succcess in this cate- 
gory. Mildred McNaughton, a resi- 
dent of Kate Chopin dormitory, 
was the only person to kill a deer 
on a hunt in Winn parish. 

Mildred killed a 10 point buck 
Friday morning that was one of the 
largest ever to be taken in the 



area. 



BSU To Hold Banquet 

The BSU Missions Banquet will 
be held December 10 at 5:15 p. m. 
at the Baptist Student Union build- 
ing. 

Nan Owens, the guest speaker 
will talk on the subject, "Footsteps 
from the Cross." 

Tickets are 25 cents. 



The Pining Of Zeus 



By Warren Fraser 

Although Antigone, daughter of 
Oedipus, insisted that her sister, 
Ismene, had no part in the burial 
of their brother, Creon ordered 
that she be put to death anyway. 
As she was led to the fire, Aeolus, 
King of the Winds, had mercy on 
her tender soul and bade Fav- 
onius, the South Wind, to carry 
her to the far away northern coun- 
try of Evajegeenus. The people 
of Evagreenus fell in love with 
Ismene and made her their queen. 
She ruled well and soon fell in 
love with a very handsome youth 
named Etidorhpa. They married 
and were blessed with a blue-eyed 
baby girl, Pinephns, who soon 
proved to be the fairest girl in the 
land. Zeus natually fell in love 
with her and was soon taking her 
for a walk every day. 

One day when Zeus and Pine- 
phus were walking in the forest, 
Zeus spotted Hera coming in her 
golden chariot. In order to keep 
Pinephus from Hear's punishment, 
he changed her into a tree and 
rushed up into the clouds to meet 
Hera. Zeus did not, however, 
change Pinephus into an ordinary 
tree; he changed her into one with 
long needles instead of leaves so 
that he could easily find it when 
he returned. 

But things did not go as 
planned. A wood nymph saw what 
had happened and came directly 
to Hera with the tale. When Zeus 
discovered thae Hera had gone in 
search of the tree to seek revenge, 
he in haste commanded all the 
trees in the world to become like 
Pinephus. Hera was out-witted, 
but Zeus was heart broken because 
he would never be able to find 
his love, and he pined night and 
day. 

Many of the gods sympathized 
with Zeus and praised him for his 
cunning, but they soon became 



lonesome for their old trees — 
Athena for her olive, Apollo 
for his laurel, Artemis for her cy- 
pess, and yes, even fickle old Zeus 
for his oak. But even though Zeus 
longed for his oak, he simply 
could not bring himself to destroy 
all of the beautiful needle trees 
which were symbolic of his lost 
love; he left the ones in Evaje- 
greenus just as they were. At the 
request of Ismene grief-stricken by 
the loss of her daughter, Zeus gave 
the needle trees the gift of perpe- 
tual life throughout the four sea- 
sons so that the memory of beau- 
tiful Pinephus would never die. 

The Evajegreenians called the 
needle trees Evajagreenus Pine- 
phis (which soon simply became 
evergreen pines) in honor of their 
dear country and their beloved 
princess. Every winter, people 
came from far and wide to this 
northern country to marvel at 
these splendid trees and to enjoy 
their newest winter sport, ice 
hockey. Oh, but that's another 
story. 



INVITATIONS 

Wedding 
Fraternal 
Printed or Engraved 



Baker's Printing 
and 
Office Supply 

Phone 2935 
St. Denis St. Natchitoches 



OPEN 

24 HOURS A DAY 

MURPHY'S RESTAURANT 

1215 WASHINGTON ST. PHONE 2609 



DON 

Theatre 



BOX OFFICE OPENS 

Mon.-Fri 5:45 

Sat. & Sun 12:45 



NOW SHOWING THROUGH SATURDAY 




CHIEF DRIVE-IN 



Now Showing 



Sunday Through Wednesday 



' jgf&y You'll laugh, you'll cry, ycrtUsing, 
youtU lose your heart to... 

"■ somwm 
WHE/aer 



I l K* tot* Mat 
I to At twit ■ 



». TECHNICOLOR* ♦ •** 




COMING 
SOON ! 



Cliff Richard — Lauri Peters 
"SUMMER HOLIDAY" 



Connie Francis 
Jim Hutton 

'LOOKING FOR LOVE' 
— plus — 

James Darren 
Pamela Tiffin 

"THE LIVELY SET" 

Both in Color 



Sun — Mon — Tues 



William Holden 
'THE 7th DAWN' 
color 



Wednesday — Thursday 
"BUCK NITES" 

"WHAT'S UP FRONT" 
— plus — 
'LOVE ON THE RIVERIA' 



Coming Dec. 13 



'YOUR CHEATING HEART" 




auce 



VOL. LI— No. 13 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



NSC Christmas Pageant To Be Friday 
Mr. and Miss NSC Will Be Named 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1964 



By Kenny Baker 

Northwestern will present its 
annual Christmas Pageant next 
Friday at 1 p. m. in the Fine Arts 
Auditorium. 

The pageant this year will be a 
special one as the combined talents 
of the drama, music, and dance de- 
partments are all included in this 
production. 

The play was written in 1949 by 
Dr. Charles E. Palmer, who will 
also serve as narrator, and was 
originally produced fo the Stage 
Crafters in Baltimore, Maryland. 
It is entitled The Shepherd's Story 
and it is the traditional story of 
Christmas; however, it is told from 
a rather different point of view. 

The whole play is relived by a 
man who witnessed, as a young 
shepherd boy, the men following 
the bright star in the sky to the 
city of Bethlehem. The old shep- 
herd is reminiscing about the 
events that took place before his 
eyes many years ago. He recalls 
the shepherds on the hillside, the 
wisemen following the star over 
Bethlehem, Mary and Joseph being 
refused at the inn and the entire 
story of the nativity. All of these 
scenes will be included in the play. 

The cast included inthe pagean 
will be a large one with the NSC 
Corale, The Northwestern Sym 
phony Orchestra, The Contempor- 
ary Dance Club, and the Dramatics 
Club all taking part in the pro- 
gram. 

Directing the play will be Dr. Ed- 
na West with Dr. Palmer doing the 
narrating. Dr. Colleen Nelken will 
direct the Contemporary Dancers, 
Dr. Joseph Carlucci will conduct 
the orchestra and Dr. Gordon Flood 
will lead the choir. The staging 
will be conducted by Mr. Frank 
Magers. 

The cast of characters in the 
play are: Old Shepherd, Harvey 
Wilson; Mary, Beverly Randolph; 
Elizabeth, Chris Newsome; Joseph, 
Gordon Parker; Inn Keeper, Sam 
Shelton; Sarah, Linda Jackson; 
Wise Men, Lawrence Vickers, Ray- 
mond Rodgers, James Norrell; 



Shepherds, Doyle Williams, Bill 
Rowell, David Durr, Donnie Car- 
roll, and Butch Toland; Angels, 
Ramona Reynolds, Cynthia Milton, 
Cathy Moss, Celeste Brooks, Gloria 
Alexander, Wavelyn Murray, and 
Sandra Stevens. 

The pageant will begin with a 
series of familiar Christmas carols 
sung by the audience and the Cor- 
ale. Various solos will be sung 
throughtout the pageant as the 
story unfolds. Soloists in the pro- 
gram are Ron Alexander, Thellie 
Levee, Don O'Bier, William Bra- 
shear, and Betty Clegg. Midway 
through the play Douglas Sullivan, 
Eric Lord, and Lynn Huey, as the 
three wise men will emerge from 
the audience dressed in colorful 
robes singing "We Three Kings." 

The Contemporary Dancers tak- 
ing part in the pageant are Carol 
Adkins, Janie Armstrong, Marga- 
ret Carroll, Phyllis Guidry, Mary 
Lawless, Betty Morgan, Wavelyn 
Murray, and Ramona Reynolds. 

The pageant will begin prompt- 
ly at 1 p. m. and there are limited 
seating facilities in the auditorium, 
so all those wishing to secure a 
seat will have to arrive as early as 
possible. 

Prior to the commencement of 
the pageant, an announcement of 
the 1964-65 Mr. and Miss NSC will 
be made. 



AWS 'Christmas at Home' Reception 
Scheduled For Sunday Afternoon 




'Qu GfuociateJ QYomen. Students 
CHortkweslern Stale Golleqe 
Present 
"Ghristmas at 3~Eome" 
Gkristmas-at-3£ome Hjecepllon 
(December 13, ig6*f 

(Draw'uuj Itoom. of Varnado 



3:00-5:00 p. m. 



Charity Bowl Football 
To Be Wednesday Night 



BSU Concludes 
Special Activities 

Monday night concluded the 
YWA Lottie Moon Week of Prayer 
at the BSU center. Highlights of 
the week were a play, "Her 
Lengthening Shadow," based on 
Lottie Moon's life, a mission's din- 
ner, and a study course taught by 
Miss Marion Mclntyre, state YMA 
director. 

BSU also held a reception for 
Mr. and Mrs. James Slack, newly 
appointed missionaries to the Phil- 
lipines. 




Two young folk singers from Alabama, Richard and Jim, 
will appear at Northwestern Tuesday at 8 p.m. in the Coli- 
seum. Their appearance is being sponsored by the Student 
Council and students will be admitted on I.D. cards. 



The Annual Charity Bowl game 
will be played on the NSC campus 
Wednesday, December 16, at 6 
p.m. in Demon Stadium. This game 
will pit two rugged clubs against 
each other. It will be Sigma Tau 
Gamma-B Frame against Kappa 
Alpha-Coonies. Tickets will be 
twenty-five cents and can be pur- 
chased from the intramural office. 

Each team will be made up of 
24 men with 12 men from each 
group making up the team. The 
Sigma Tau-B Frame roster includes 
Trigger Allen, Jeff Harris, Derell 
Strother, Butch Wiggins, Eugene 
Smith, Bob Koll. 

Mike McDaniel, Kenny Gault, O.L. 
Evans, Fed Parker, Bill Schwartz, 
Rodney Elkins, Bill Murphy, 
George Robinson, Bill Holsteader, 
Barry Guillet, Jack Hollinghead, 
Johnny Smith, Jim Bosler, Jim 
Hollingsworth, Jim Beam, Dickie 
Jester, Everette Phillips, and Bob- 
by Bond. 

The KA-Coonie squad will be 
Ronnie Guillot, Fred Frazer, Jack 
Morman, Bruce Fraser, Curney 
Stokes, Ronnie Mouton, Sarge Ar- 
mond, Frank Solis, Frank Dean, 
Ralph Tyler, Buddy Cornier, Thorn 
Williams, Tom Baker, Bob Vinci- 
ent, Steve Blount, Galen Wamble, 

Graduate Student 
Has Poem Printed 

Nancy Au, a graduate student 
of the English Department at 
Northwestern, received heartiest 
congratulations from D. Hartman, 
the editor of National Poetry Press 
in Los Angeles, California. Mr. 
Hartman informed Miss Au that 
her poem entitled "Meditation" 
has been selected by the board of 
Judges to be published in the An- 
nual Anthology of College Poetry. 

The Anthology is a compilation 
of the finest poetry written by 
the college men and women of 
America, representing every state 
in the country. The selections are 
made from many thousands of 
manuscripts submitted. 

Miss Au is a foreign student 
from Hong Kong. Most of her 
poems, essays, short stories, etc., 
have been published in Hong Kong 
and Thailand, as well as in Ameri- 
ca in both the Chinese and English 
languages. She is expecting to re- 
ceive her graduate degree in the 
Spring. Her major work is Educa- 
tion in English, with a minor in 
Sociology. She hopes to study in 
Europe a year before she returns 
to Hong Kong to teach. 



Danny Davis, Tom Kathy, Lynn 
Myers, Lynn Hargrove, Kent Mc- 
Michael, Bob Cuphert, Junior Mul- 
lins, and Tim Miciotto. 

The game will also clash two 
fine coaching staffs against each 
other. Leading the KA-Coonie 
group will be Kenny Guillot, Allen 
Plummer, Al Dodd, Al Moreau, 
Donnie Carroll, and Gary Pittman 
Their opposition will be Ross 
Gwinn, Claude Patrick, Lawrence 
Nugent, and Don Beasley. The man- 
ager for the KA group will be No- 
lan Traigle. 

The entire proceeds for the 
game will be donated to the United 
Fund. 



Employment Book 
For Summer Work 
Available Now 

There are 40,000 new summer 
jobs available throughout the 
United States in 1965. 

Students can begin their sum- 
mer plans during Christmas vaca- 
tion from information contained in 
the 1965 "Summer Employment 
Directory" just off the press! 

The outlook for 1965 is bright. 
There are more jobs than last sum- 
mer. The pay is up $50 to $100 in 
many cases, particularly at sum- 
mer camps. Employers, however, 
are asking more often for workers 
who are at least 18 years of age 
and experienced. 

Summer camps, resorts, national 
parks, and business firms offer the 
greatest number of jobs. The 
greatest increase is found with 
direct selling companies offering 
products from cookware and cos- 
metics to shoes and made-to-mea- 
sure shirts; national parks, which 
are feeling the surge of more 
vacationers; and, employment 
agencies — many of which do not 
charge a fee for placement. 

Students are also needed at 
summer theaters, ranches, restaur- 
ants, government, and amusement 
parks, to mention a few. 

Name and address of employers, 
positions open and details on how 
to apply are contained in the 1965 
"Summer Employent Directory." 
Students wishing summer work 
apply directly to the employers 
who are included in the Directory 
at their own request. 

Ask for "Summer Employment 
Directory" at the bookstore or 
send $3 to National Directory Ser- 
vice, Box 32065, Cincinatti, Ohio. 



By Sharon Hillman 

The annual AWS reception will 
be held Sunday in the Drawing 
Room of Varnado Hall from 3 to 
5 p.m. Each girl's dormitory will 
dress three dolls in accordance 
with the theme: Christmas At 
Home, and these dolls will be 
placed on display in the Drawing 
Room. 

This is one of the best-loved 
traditions of the Associated 
Women Student's program, when 
students, faculty, townspeople, and 
parents are invited to come and 
enjoy a Christmas story as portray- 
ed by miniature doll scenes. 

This event is presented annually 
in the Rose Reception Room of 
Varnado Hall with the members 
of each residence hall participat- 
ing, those of the off-campus clin- 
cial areas, and the students of the 
Town Associated Women's pro- 
gram all contributing to the occas- 
ion. 

The drawing room features a 
Christmas tree along with other 
massive, ceiling-high decorated 
displays in the room with the 
Christmas theme. 

This year there will be 42 dolls 
depicting scenes and events cen- 
terde around the general theme, 
which is activities and prepara- 
tions for "Christmas at Home." 

The dolls will be dressed by the 
regularly enrolled women students 
of Northwestern, who not cjnly 
donate all materiols and accessor- 
ies for the costumes but also lend 
their talents and creative abilities 
to make their assigned motif of 
the general theme one of outstand- 
ing design, interest, and appeal. 

A doll, which has been the cyno- 
sure forall eyes and is always 
lovingly admired, is dressed in 
the traditional outfit of the Natch- 
itoches "Miss Merry Christmas" 
and is placed in a prominent place. 
She, too, has become part of 
Northwestern's Christmas tradi- 
tion, as she is brought forth each 
year in her bright and beautiful 
red velvet costume. 

The officers of the AWS, the 
TAWS, and of the residence halls 
serve as hostesses along with the 
Dean of Women, the Assistant 
Dean of women, and all the House 
Directors in the women's program. 
The dolls remain on display on 
Monday and Tuesday following the 
reception for the school children 
of Natchitoches and the vicinity 
to come to see. 

Then the dolls with all their 
extra clothes and accessories are 
later given to the Jaycees and the 
Salvation Army, who in turn then 
distribute them among the needy 
children of the area. Also, Christ- 
mas yarties are Iheld. in th\e 
women's residence halls and gifts 
and donations are solicited at this 
time for the philanthropic project 
of the AWS. 



Newman Center 
Has New Chapel 

Students of the Newman Apos- 
tolate completed the last phase of 
the renovation of their chapel this 
week with the installation of 
thirty-four solid mahogany pews 
by a small group of students head- 
ed by building committee co-chair- 
men James Sakovich and George 
Oliver. 

The pews will seat approximate- 
ly 200 people. To complete the de- 
core new altar furnishings were 
bought, a confessional was built, 
and a tile floor was laid earlier 
in the fall. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1964 



Kappa Alpha National President To Visit Campus; 
First Time In History Of Campus Organization 



Dr. John W. Nowell is scheduled 
to visit the Gamma Psi chapter of 
Kappa Alpha for the annual cele- 
bration of the Convivium on Janu- 
ary 16. Convivium is the obser- 
vance of the birthdate of Kappa 
Alpha's spiritual head and founder 
General Robert E. Lee. It has been 
the traditional custom of the Kappa 
Alpha Order throughout the nation 
to observe this occasion with a 
banquet. Actually General Lee's 
birthdate is January 19th, but Gam- 
ma Psi chapter has elected to hold 
its festivities on the former date. 
It was General Lee who founded 
the Order on December 21, 1865, 
at Washington College, now Wash- 
ington and Lee University, in Rich- 
mond, Virginia. 

The chapter is especially proud 
and honored to have this visit 
from the distinguished Knight 
Commander since we will now 
have an excellent opportunity to 
start the 100th year of our Order's 
existence in a grand way. We have 
many notable guests as well as 
members of the other chapters in 
Louisiana. 

Dr. Nowell is a man of many 
worthy achievements throughout 
his life. He received his B. S. de- 
gree from Wake Forest College and 
continued his studies for his Ph. D. 
at the University of North Caro- 
lina. He was indeed an active stu- 
dent belonging to many societies 
and receiving honorary awards in- 
cluding Phi Beta Kappa, Gamma 
Sigma Epsilon, Omicron Delta Kap- 
pa, Society of Sigma Xi, Chairman 
of the North Carolina Section of 
the American Chemical Society, 
and the Dupont Fellowship to the 
University of North Carolina. 

In the professional capacity he 
is a professor of chemistry at Wake 
Forest College and chairman of 
the Department of Chemistry. He 
is also the Director of the Summer 
Institute for high school teachers 
of science and mathematics, which 
is part of the National Science 
Foundation Grant. He has pub- 
lished "A Laboratory Manual of 
Physical Chemistry" and "Exper- 



DO YOUR CHRISTMAS 
SHOPPING EARLY! 

Gifts Any Price Range 




Broadmoor Gift 
and Furniture 

Phone 5756 




For Good 
Hair Coloring 
Shaping 
Styling 



visit 

TRESSIES 
Beauty Salon 

in 

East Natchitoches 
Call 4536 

Closed Mondays 
See 

Tressie - Elsie - Irma 
Jean - Linda 

201 EAST Third Street 
Across from Warrens Mkt. 






iments in General Chemistry." 

Or. Nowell was Commadder of 
Kappa Alpha's Smith Province, 
National Scholarship Officer, a 
member of the Kappa Alpha Scho- 
larship Fund and of the Executive 
Council when he was elected to 
the highest office, that of Knight 
Commander. 

On the interfraternity level he 
was the vice-president of the Scho- 
larship Officers Association, the 
KA delegate to the National Inter- 
fraternity Conference, and a mem- 
ber of several national committees 
for Omicron Delta Kappa. 

With these credentials our 
Knight Commander is the ideal KA 



member, living up to all the aspira- 
tions of Robert E. Lee when he 
founded the Order. He has devoted 
most of his life to educating and 
leading college men. That is why 
Gamma Psi Chapter is looking for- 
ward to meeting our leader on Jan- 
uary 16th. Thus we take this oppor- 
tunity to welcome his forthcoming 
visit to Northwestern and Gamma 
Psi Chapter. 

In the recent intramural volley- 
ball contest the KA team placed 
third. 

The KA-Coonie team is in its 

final week of preparation for the 

Charity Bowl. Kickoff time will be 
Wednesday at 6 p. m. in the Sta- 



OPEN 
24 HOURS A DAY 

MURPHY'S RESTAURANT 

1215 WASHINGTON ST. PHONE 2609 



Greek Talk 



SIGMA TAU GAMMA 

Sigma Tau Gamma announces 
that tickets to the 1964 Charity 
Bowl Game to be held December 
16 in Demon Stadium can be pur- 
chased from any active member 
of the fraternity. This traditional 
game which is sponsored by the 
Intramural Department has been 
made possible through the efforts 
of Coach Bonnette. All proceeds 
will be donated to charity. 

The annual "Rip-snorter," held 
after the fireworks at the Christ- 
mas Festival, proved to be one of 
the most successful events of the 
Sigma Tau social season. The 
crowd, estimated at over 50 
people, was entertained by the 
music of the Capris. The "Rose of 
Sigma Tau Gamma," Cecilia Shea, 
was presented with the Sweetheart 
Pin. 

Party plans for the immediate 
future include a Christmas Bar-B- 
Que Supper, where actives will ex- 
change gifts, and two parties 
which will be held in Shreveport 
during the Christmas holidays. 



dium. Tickets are 25 cents and may 
be purchased from any KA or 
Coonie member. The proceeds will 
be turned over to the United Fund. 
All are urged to come and spread 
a little Christmas Spirit for charity 
and see a great game at the same 
time. Members of both teams have 
worked hard to prepare for the 
game and deserve the support of 
the student body. 

At the last regular KA meeting 
Brother Chuck Rabalais was ap- 
pointed to the post of Number V 
(Historian) to fill the office vacat- 
ed by Brother Dave Poe who will 
be graduating this spring. 



DELTA ZETA 

Epsilon Beta Chapter of Delta 
Zeta witnessed another successful 
Christmas festival last Saturday. 
DZ wishes to thank Sam Lucero, 
DZ Man of the Year, and Sigma 
Tau Gamma fraternity for their 
help in construction of the Delta 
Zeta booth and in the selling of 
refreshments. 

DZ pledges were given a sur- 
prise Christmas party Monday 
night. The party was given by 
pledge trainer Betty Sue DeWitt 
and her assistant, Doris Scales. The 
pledges enjoyed cokes and a cake 
in the DZ colors with "Merry 
Christmas DZ pledges" written on 
it. 

The pledges are continuing to 
make plans for the Christmas 
party for the actives to be held 
next week. DZ actives are greatly 
anticipating this party where they 
will be entertained by the pledges, 
and where the identities of their 
secret little sisters will be revealed. 

The Charity Bowl to be held 
December 16 is to be one of the 
most exciting events of the Christ- 
mas season. Delta Zeta urges all 
Greeks and non-Greeks to attend 
this thrilling game. 



SIGMA KAPPA 

The Sigma Kappas elected 
Mickie Varnado pledge of the week 
for last week. Inez Zate was elect- 
ed for this week. They were each 
presented long stem red roses. 

Tuesday night Sigma Kappa will 
have their Christmas party. The 
pledges and actives will exchange 
gifts, and then they are to decorate 
their tree. Following this, all the 
sororities and fraternities shall 
meet for a Greek Sing and sing 
Christmas carols at the various 
dorms. 



NEW SERVICE AVAILABLE 

Quick service drycleaning and shirt laundering is 
now offered at Community Cleaners & Shirt Laundry 
located at 103 Second Street. 

Drycleaning in by 10 A. M. may be picked up by 
5 P. M. the same day Monday - Saturday with pressing 
while you wait. 

Shirts in one day to include Friday may be picked 
up by 5 P. M. the following day. 

COMMUNITY CLEANERS AND 
SHIRT LAUNDRY 



Phone 2229 



103 Second St. 




GIFTS GALORE! 

•for Everyone on your Christmas List 




FOR HER: 

• THE FINEST BY 

REVLON 
SHALIMAR 
CHANEL NO. 5 
MAX FACTOR 
DOROTHY GREY 

• STATIONARY BY 

EDRIDGE 
MONTAG 



Games And Gifts 
for Children 



FOR HIM: 

• TOILETRIES BY 

REVLON 
MAX FACTOR 
FABERGE' 

• BILLFOLDS & TRAVELING 

KITS 



Two Stores To Serve You 



DeBLIEUX' PHARMACY 

BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 
PHONE 4582 



NEW DRUG STORE 

SECOND AND ST. DENIS 
PHONE 2386 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



Editorials 



Student Directories Are History 

Economy is of utmost importance to an institution such as 
Northwestern, but sometimes one must realize that speed and 
efficiency can more than adequately compensate for a little addi- 
tional cost in some matters. This is precisely the situation that 
exists in the printing of the student telephone directories for 
this semester. 

We are currently completing the eleventh week of school, 
and there is still no sign of the student directories that should 
have been out soon after the semester started. We are having 
the directories prepared and printed here at the College, and 
until this is changed, the directories will continue to be history 
when they are distributed each year. 

Under the present system, the directories are just printed 
during the Fall semester. This in itself is bad because nearly half 
of the students move from one dormitory to another between 
semesters, and one is wasting his time in trying to dial the num- 
bers. 

The tardiness in the appearance of the directories also 
places a tremendous amount of extra work on the campus tele- 
phone operators. In addition to handling all of the calls coming 
in, they are continuously searching for phone numbers for 
people on campus. 

This is not one of those common problems without a prac- 
ticle solution. There are many other alternatives that could be 
worked out requiring little additional expense, if any, and could 
produce a better directory. There are private companies that 
specialize in this type work, and some of them don't even charge 
the colleges anything. They finance the book by selling adver- 
tising space to the local businesses. 

This is one problem that cannot go unattended for years 
and hope that the situation will improve or go away. That is what 
is wrong now. We have been straggling along using the same 
methods of doing things that were applicable during the "horse 
and buggy days" when the enrollment was less than 1000. We 
now have to make plans for the future and base them on some- 
thing other than the past. 



PASSING IN REVIEW 




By Ernie Harris 



Students Should Support Advertisers 

It has long been the contention of the Students at North- 
western that the merchants and people of Natchitoches do not 
fully realize the impetus of the College on the economy of this 
area. For some, this may be a justifiable criticism, but for most 
there is absolutely no basis for this statement. As a whole, the 
merchants are most keenly aware of the importance of the Col- 
lege, and support its activities wholeheartedly. 

It is not difficult to distinguish between those who believe 
in the importance of the College; and thus students should make 
every effort to frequent those places of business interested in 
you and the College. If you have ever listened to the ballgames 
over KNOC, you know that there is a Demon Boosters Club in 
town and the ballgames are sponsored by this group. 

Another most important means of determining those people 
interested in the College is through the advertisements in the 
"Current Sauce." This doesn't include all those interested be- 
cause there are some places in town that aren't directly affected 
by the student business and cannot profit through this median 
of advertising. But, there are numerous other places in town 
that do not advertise because they feel that they are going to get 
your business anyway. 

A list is now being compiled of those businesses that are fre- 
quent advertisers in the "Sauce," and will be distributed to all 
dormitory rooms. It would be a great service to the "Sauce," to 
the advertisers, and to you if you would patronize only those 
businesses truly interested in you and the College whenever 
possible. 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 




SEEN -M^fcJ^B^ 




S-iS 

''Utile /W<Je pate 



In organizations, there are mem- 
bers who perform important duties 
but remain unnoticed. Mrs. J. 
Burkhalter who performs secre- 
terial duties for the Corps is such 
a member. She does all of the typ- 
ing, paper-work, etc. At the first 
of the month, she especially en- 
dears herself to the Advanced 
Corps when she hands them their 
pay-checks for the past month. She 
is also in charge of the attendance 
records as well as the business mat- 
ters for the Corps. Needless to say, 
she has her hands full with these 
duties, and she performs them 
quite efficiently. 

Considering the time element 
as well as the construction itself, 
the float that was entered in the 
parade was one of the most origi- 
nal ones that I have ever seen. 
Congratulations to Capt. Marks 
and to all of the cadets that helped 
with this project for a job well 
done. 

Juanell Savage, Donna Pollard, 
and Sam Shelton gave the float an 
authentic air by portraying the 
various themes of the parade. Jua- 
nell Savage played the part of San- 
ta Claus, while Sam and Donna 
dressed in the style that was popu- 
lar when the steamboat was a com- 
mon form of travel. 

Because of the freezing tempera- 
tures and the essence of good grip 
on the rifles, the "side-throw" was 
not used in the parade Saturday. 
Capt.A Cooper of Headquarters Co. 
invented this particular maneuver 
and worked out the details him- 
self. Lt. C. K. Canfield, Guidon 
Bearer, also uses his own original 
manuvers in the various routines 
that the Knights perform. The 
Knights looked sharp as ever in 
the parade; too bad that the 
weather prevented the Knights 
from using their more intricate 
maneuvers. 

The Southern Invitational Drill 
Competition will be held at LSU in 
Baton Rouge in the latter part of 
March. The Knights started prac- 
tising this past week for the meet. 
The Knights placed first in this 
event last year, and I am confident 
that they will make it two in a row 
this year. 

The Companies are being rated 
now, and for this past week Head- 
quarters Co. placed first. This was 
just recently started, and there- 
suits will be increased pride in the 
Corps at NSC. 

My apologies to Cadet Sgt. Shaw 
for not having his picture in the 
Sauce last week. It was an error on 
our part and we will have it in this 
weeks' paper along with the CA- 



DET OF THE WEEK for this past 
week. 

The Mens' Rifle Team will meet 
McNeese this Saturday at Ft. Polk 
with the winner of the match going 
to Ft. Hood, Texas to compete in 
the matches that will be held there. 
Staff Sgt. Fiveash (RA) attended 
The Small Bore Rifle Coaches Cli- 
nic at Ft. Hood prior to his assign- 
ment as instructor for the Men and 
Women Rifle Teams. 

Congratulations go out to Cadet 
Pvt. Douglas Sullivan for being 
chosen CADET OF THE WEEK. 
Douglas hails from Leesville and 
is a freshman majoring in Business 
Administration. Cadet Sullivan is 
presently serving in Headquarters 
Co., third squad, second platoon. 






Sullivan 





Shaw 



Eliza and Burtonius 



Aphrodite gritted her elegant 
teeth. That sensuous mouth of 
which men have dreamed for thou- 
sands of years was drawn into a 
small tight circle. She crushed the 
creamy magnolia that she had 
been caressing a moment before 
and abruptly dropped it. 

"Upstart!" she muttered between 
grim lips. "Impudent upstart! Ah, 
but as always, I shall have my re- 
venge." 

She curtly dismissed the adoring 
messenger, who had just delivered 
a bit of startling news, and walked 
slowly and deliberately to an ex- 
quisite pink love seat. She sat 
gracefully down, and thoughtfully 
placed the tip of a lacquered nail 
into her mouth. 

The tidings which had so thor- 
oughly disrupted Aphrodite's tran- 
quil afternoon were actually of 
little surprise to the rest of the 
world. Eliza, Queen of the Cinema, 
was simply about to wed her fifth 
husband, Burtonius, a rugged he- 
man type of star. Their romance 
had developed during the filming 
of one of those multi-million dollar 
spectaculars concerned with Egyp- 
tian queens, Roman soldiers, and 



corpulent senators prancing about 
in pretty white robes. 

Aphrodite had been interested 
in Burtonius for some time; and 
the thought that she, Goddess of 
Love, had been "beaten to the 
punch," especially by a mere mor- 
tal was just too much to bear. Fin- 
ally, after much contemplation, 
she devised a suitable scheme of 
revenge. 

As the celebrated couple were 
honeymooning in Paris, Eliza 
decided to purchase a few expen- 
sive gowns. She and Burtonius im- 
mediately headed to an eminent 
couterier, seated themselves on 
two of those hard but elegant little 
chairs that one often finds in such 
establishments, and demanded to 
be shown some frocks. 

The first mannequin appeared 
wearing a monstrous creation 
which must have been made solely 
for publicity value. The ludicrous 
garment was of a garish color and 
had absolutely no shape. Another 
terribly unsuitable feature of the 
dress was its neckline which was a 
bit high for Eliza, patroness of the 
daring decolletage. 

At that moment, however, the 



Student Council 
Minutes 

December 7, 1964 
The regular meeting of the stu- 
dent council was held at 6 p.m. 
in Bullard Hall. The meeting v/as 
caled to order by President Steve 
Bount. Thomas called the roll. The 
minutes were read and approved. 
Blount announced that the Dixie- 
land Band played for the basket- 
ball game last week. The College 
Band will play for the game 
Wednesday, December 9. There 
will be a conflict between the time 
of the game and the time of the 
Wednesday dance. Betty Moore 
moved that the council dispense 
with the Wednesday dances when 
the time of the dance will conflict 
with the time of a basketball game. 
Second by Jean Walker. Motion 
passed. 

J. O. Charrier announced that 
Richard and Jim would perform 
Tuesday, December 14 at 8 p.m. 
in the coliseum. 

Calbert Marcantel asked if there 
was anything that the council 
could do to help the Black Knights 
obtain permission to go to Wash- 
ington to compete nationally. Mar- 
cantel said that it was reported to 
him that the group could not go 
i because they would be competing 
, with integrated groups, Marcantel 
will check into the situation. 

Scotty Maxwell reported that the 
present system of checking voters' 
names off at the polls was ineffec- 
tive. J. 0. Charrier called for a 
meeting of the election board fol- 
lowing the council meeting. 

Jimmy Berry suggested that at 
| least one door on each side of the 
coliseum be open when the coli- 
seum is used. People would be at 
these side doors to check I. D. 
cards, and this would keep students 
from walking around to the front 
of the building. 

Maxwell moved that something 
be done about having a light put 
up in fron tof Schieb Hall. Second 
by Milton Rhea. Maxwell as ap- 
pointed to check into this. 

Marcantel asked what had been 
done about the construction of the 
neon "N". Rhea reported that a 
new "N" had not been constructed 
because it is not definite whether 
the water tower will be moved. If 
it is not moved, the old neon "N" 
on the tower will be repaired. 

Charrier suggested that the 
fence which runs along the road 
to the coliseum be moved back so 
that students who walk to the col- 
iseum would not have to walk in 
the street. Thomas suggested that 
a walk be built from the stadium 
to the coliseum. 

J. O. Charrier suggested that a 
committe be formed to study 
school spirit at NSC. The commit- 
tee would interview students and 
student leaders to find out their 
views on how it could be improved. 
Charrier moved that the problem 
of school spirit be referred to a 
five member committee for study. 
Second by Betty Moore. Charrier 
will act as chairman. Working with 
him will be Carolyn Thomas, Roy 
Corley, Milton Rhea, and Bonnie 
Methvin. The committee will meet 
weekly. 

There being no further business 
Pat Holley moved the meeting be 
adjourned. Second by Barbara 
Wallace. Meeting adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Carolyn Thomas 

Secretary 



cunning Aphrodite took action. She 
made the unsuspecting cinema 
queen fall hopelessly in love with 
the garment! Ignoring Burtonius' 
objections, Eliza purchased the 
hideous frock and immediately put 
it on. In a frenzy of excitement, 
she ordered an additional twenty- 
five of these, all in identical fash- 
ion. 

Quite naturally, the star's first 
public appearance in one of her 
new ensembles caused a sensa- 
tion. Women of all ages began cla- 
moring at their dressmakers for 
garments of similar style. 

The Goddess of Love was thus 
avenged, for much to man's des- 
pair, she had introduced to the 
gentler sex the form-concealing 
shift. 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1964 



FfiOM THE 





BY U£R*y BZiLL 



As a topic for this week, I 
thought it would be fitting to men- 
tion a few words about the NSC 
cross-country track team. This 
years team has been one that has 
shown a will to win. In their first 
three meets, they did rather poor- 
ly, losing by lopsided scores. They 
didn't let this stop them, though. 
From then on, they didn't lose 
another meet and they ended up 
in second place in the GSC, just 
one point behind Northeast, the 
league champions. 

It should be remembered that 
cross-country is an individual 
sport. If one person looks bad, the 
rest of the team can't make up for 
his mistakes. It must be that per- 
son or no one. These men worked 
hard and not one of them let the 
team down. As Coach Howell put 
it, "these boys were never satisfied 
with their performance. They al- 
ways wanted to do better. This is 




Charles Ragus 



Raps, Aldredge 
Sign Professional 
Football Contracts 

Tackle Charles Ragus and end 
Corwyn Aldredge have signed con- 
tracts to play football in the pro- 
fessional football leagues. 

Ragus, a graduate of Fair Park 
high school in Shreveport, signed 
a contract with the Kansas City 
Chiefs of the American Football < 
League. He was signed by scout j 
James W. Beavers. Charles stands ! 
at 6'5" and weighs 260 pounds and j 
will be used as a defensive tackle, j 
Aldredge was signed by the 
Cleveland Browns of the National 
Football League. Corwyn stands 
6'4" and weighs 235 pounds and 
hails from St. Martinville. Details 
of his signing were not available. 



the mark of a true champion." 

We think this also and wish to 
congratulate Ray Hale for his job 
as coach and also to the runners 
themselves for a job well done. 

This is considered pretty good 
for a team that was suppose to 
finish near the bottom of the GSC 
standings. 

We also noted on the schedule 
for next week the annual Charity 
Bowl football game. We encourage 
everyone to see this game for the 
money colected is going to a very 
worthy cause. It should also be 
a pretty good football game. 

Here it is, that time year again 
when the weather is getting cold, 
the Christmas holidays draw near- 
er, and the list of bowl games just 
stare me in the face. These games 
usually do nothing but bring the 
average down in predicting. But, 
since it is getting so close to Christ- 
mas, I thought I would give it 
another try. 

Pecan Bowl 

Lamar Tech (10) over Iowa State 
College - - - Cardinals should be 
flying too high to be stopped by 
the team from Iowa. 

Tangerine Bowl 

Massachusetts (6) over East Caro- 
lina - - - Could also be called the 
Toss-Up Bowl. 

Bluebonnet Bowl 

Tulsa (7) over Mississippi - . - 
"The only way to go is up" could 
be the saying for both clubs. Miss- 
issippi goes up by winning after 
a disappointing season. Tulsa goes 
up via the airways. 

Liberty Bowl 

Utah (14) over West Virginia 

Utah should provide a breeze for 
this indoor bowl as they sweep by 
the Virginians. 

Sun Bowl 

Georgia (7) over Texas Tech . - - 



NSC Track Team 
Wins Second Place 

The Demons of NSC almost pul- 
led the upset of the year in Cross- 
country Track as they fell only 
one point shy of tying Conference 
winner Northeast State College. 

The Demons ended up with 49 
points, only one point behind the 
Indians who ended up with 48. 
Finishing in third place with 82 
points was McNeese while the 
Bulldogs of Southwestern ended 
fourth with 99 points. La. Tech 
finished fifth with 104 while 
Southeastern finished last with 34. 

Finishing first for the course 
was Malcoml Robinson who won 
his fourth straight title. His time 
was 18:51.4, just 37.6 seconds a- 
head of NSC's Eddie Watt, 19:29.0. 
Third place was won by another 
Demon star, Tony Ward,whose 
time was 20:12.0. Also finishing 
for the Demons was Tim Poston 
Bob Bufalo, Franz Focke, Dalton 
Phelps, and Nick Wright. 



This will be Georgias year over 
Techs. Having already stung the 
Yellow Jackets, they should ride 
the Red Raiders to defeat. 

Orange Bowl 
Alabama (7) over Texas - - - Tide 
remains undefeated, number one, 
as they steer the Steers back to the 
old corral. 

Sugar Bowl 

LSU (6) over Syracuse - - . Tigers 
have lost too many this year and 
another loss they don't want to see. 

Cotton Bowl 
Arkansas (13) over Nebraska - - - 
Razorbacks keep perfect record as 
SOUTHERN teams make clean 
sweep of their bowl bids. 

Rose Bowl 
Michigan (12) over Oregon State - 
West Coast falls to defeat at the 
hands of a club having nothing 
but victory in mind. 

Gator Bowl 
Florida State (7) over Oklahoma - 
Staters beat Florida, a team which 
beat Ole Miss and LSU. This is 
enough to make a person choose 
them. 



For The Best 
Food In Town 

Stop In 

At The 

WADDLE 'N 
GRILL 

Phone 4949 
HIGHWAY 1 SOUTH 




NSC Football, Cross-Country Teams 
Honored With Banquet Tuesday Night 



Northwestern State College held 
its annual football and cross- 
country banquet Tuesday in St. 

State Badminton 
Tourney Being Held 
On NSC Campus 

Northwestern will host the tenth 
annual Louisiana Open Badmitton 
Tournament to be held today and 
Saturday. Play in the college divi- 
sion started at 1 p. m. today and 
competition in the open division 
will begin at 6 p. m. in Prather 
Coliseum. 

The high school division of the 
tournament begins Saturday morn- 
ing at nine in the Natchitoches 
high school gym and the veterans 
divisions opens at ten in the coli- 
seum. 

This tournament is expected to 
be represented by from six to eight 
colleges. Among these attending 
will be the University of Texas, 
Memphis State, Texas State College 
for Women, and Northeast. 

Champions in last years tourna- 
ment are Dr. Charles F. Thomas of 
NSC in the mens singles and And- 
rea Farrow of NSC in the womens 
singles. Also returning will be 
Hugh Berryman and Harold Clark 
of Dallas who will be trying to de- 
fend their men's double title. The 



Denis Dining Hall. Top award win- 
ner for the year was quarterback 
Don Beasley, a senior from Natchi- 
toches. Beasley has been selected 
as the Most Valuable Player, was 
one of two permanent team cap- 
tains chosen, and he also won the 
scholastic award. 

The other permanent team cap- 
tain named was guard Grover Col- 
vin. 

For offense, the top lineman 
named was center Fred Fulton of 
Natchitoches. The top offensive 
back was James Aymond. 

Defensive honors were shared by 
two Demons. Al Dodd and Allen 
Plummer were the outstanding per- 
formers in this department. 

The Coaches Award went to cen- 
ter Carroll Long of Winnfield. 

The Jordan and Booth Award, 
given to the player with outstand- 
ing play in the La. Tech-NSC game 
and chosen by sports writers and 
radio representatives, was award- 
ed to end Dick Reding of Bossier. 

Also receiving trophies and hon- 
ored at the banquet were mem- 
bers of the cross-country team 
which finished only one point be- 
hind GSC champion Northeast. Re- 
ceiving Awards and Letters were 
Eddie Watt, Tony Ward, Bob Du- 
falo, Tim Poston, Franz Focke, 
Nick Wright, Dalton Phelps, and 
Jerry Campbell. 



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ffUDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 




Page 5 



£3 



One of the events to be presented by the NSC Gymnast 
Team on Monday, Dec. 14, will be the high scissors on the 
pommeled horse, as demonstrated by Richard Lloyd. 

Gymnast Clinic 
To Be Held Here 

Fred Martinez, assistant pro- 
fessor of health and physical 
education and head gymnasts 
coach, has announced that there 
will be a gymnastic Clinic and 
Demonstration to be held Monday 
at NSC and will be sponsored by 
the NSC health and physical 
education department. 

Martinez said the program was 
intended to provide knowledge of 
this activity for educators and 
students as to what is required in 
a gymnastics program and how to 
teach it. It is intended to promote 
proper techniques, progression 
and trainning. 

There will be no charge for the 
clinic and students are invited. 
Instructions will be at the Men's 
Gym on the NSC Campus. Regis- 
tration will take place at 9 a.m. 
with a demonstration by the NSC 
Varsity team climaxing the day at 
7:30 p.m. 

People attending should bring 
their own workout equipment and 
be prepared to participate. 




For the photographic record of your 
wedding, the services of a qualified 
professional photographer are essen- 
tial. Call us today, won't you? 

John C Guillet 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

403 Second Street 
Ph. 2381 Natchitoches 



Ladies - Mens - Childrens - Gloves $1.00 pr. 

Ladies and Mens Sweat Shirts - $1.00 

Men's Watch and Jewelry set only $10.00 

Ladies Necklace set $1.00 each 

Large Assortment of Ladies Sleep Wear 
Your Choice $2.00 each 



Our Toy Land Is Now Open So Come In Now And 
Use E-Z Lay Away Plan. A Small Down Payment 
Will Hold Till Christmas At No Extra Charge. 

You'll find these and other outstanding 
values at BILL'S this weekend 

SHOP WITH US— YOU'LL BE GLAD YOU DID 

BILL'S DOLLAR STORE 

768 Front St. Phone 9475 




Got a second? Lend an ear. Dodge's a 
new, hot new Coronet 500 has got an 
awful lot going for it (besides your girl). 
For instance: buckets and backup lights, 
full carpeting and a console, spinners 
and a padded dash— all standard equip- 
ment. More? Much I Like an engine 
lineup that would make any car squeal 
for joy: 273, 318, 361, 383 or 426 cubic 



inches. Like a lean and hungry look. And 
like a low, low price tag— Coronet costs 
less than any full-size Dodge in years. 
We can't hope to make you a believer 
with an ad, so we'd like to extend an in- 
vitation—come and see the 1965 Coronet 
500 at your nearest Dodge dealer's. 
Bring your girl along ... it makes for 
a cheap date. 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1964 



Essay Winners May Win European Trip 
Including Summer School Session 



First prize of a month-long all- 
expense paid trip to Europe, in- 
cluding a special summer-school 
session about the United Nations in 
Geneva, will be awarded to the 
winner of a college essay-writing 
contest sponsored by the Collegiate 
Council for the United Nations. 
CCUN is basing the contest on the 
first of a series of 90-minute tele- 
vision entertainment programs 
about the UN that are being deve- 
loped by Telsun Foundation. Inc. 

Undergraduate studemts enroll- 
ed in any accredited college or 
university are invited to submit 
entries. They must compose an 
essay of 3,500 words or less after 
watching "Carol for AncWier 
Christmas," the TV program which 
will be televised on the ABC net- 
work on Monday evening, Dec. 28, 
at 8:30. 

Each essay must concentrate on 
the same theme on which writer 
Rod Serling based his script for 
"Carol for Another Christmas" - - 
the idea that today, more than ever 
before, no man can live as an is- 



land. From this, each student may 
point his essay in whatever direc- 
tion his intellect and fancy may 
take him. 

The grand prize winner will be 
flown from his home anywhere in 
the U. S. to Europe. Upon comple- 
tion of the summer-school session 
at Geneva, co-sponsored by the 
World Federation of United 
Nations Associations and the In- 
ternational Student Movement for 
the UN, the student will be provid- 
ed with the necessary funds for 
several weeks' travel in Europe. 

Second prize is an expense-paid 
trip to New York to attend inten- 
sive briefings about the UN at a 
special summer session. The third 
prize winner will receive a trip to 
San Francisco in June to take part 
in the 20th anniversary celebra- 
tion of the signing of the UN Char- 
ter. Fourth and fifth prizes are 
complete 24-volume sets of the En- 
cyclopedia Brittannica, 1964 Edi- 
tion, while 12 regional winners will 
receive two-volume sets of the Bri- 



Young Republicans 
Will Meet Tonight 

The Northwestesn Young Re- 
publicans Club will b,ost top 
Friday, December 11, at 7p.m. in 
the Libriry Auditorium. 

To highlight the event, a weiner 
roast will be held in a uearby 
roadside park. Transportation to 
and from the outing will be furn- 
ished 



tannica World Language Diction- 
ary. 

Peliminary judging of all essays 
are to be conducted regionally by 
a board comprising the CCUN 
regional director, appropriate 
faculty members and representa- 
tives of the United Nations Asso- 
ciation of the U.S. The top five 
essays from each region will then 
be forwarded to CCUN headquar- 
ters for judging by the national 
blue ribbon panel. 

All students intending to enter 
the contest must notify the CCUN, 
at 345 E. 46th Street, New York 
City, no later than Jan. 15. They 
will then be mailed complete rules 
and details. 



Melinda Watkins Named Miss Potpourri 
By Staff En Election This Week 




Melinda Watkins, a senior Latin 
major from Shreveport, was elect- 
ed Miss Potpourri of 1965 by the 
members of the Potpourri staff. 
Miss Potpourri is chosen by the 
staff members on the basis of her 
contributions of leadership and 
service to Northwestern. She and 
each member of the Court is the 
most outstanding girl in her cate- 
gory. 

Those elected as members of the 
Potpourri Court were as follows: 
Bettie Moore, most ambitious; 
Jean Walker, most appropriately 
dressed; Sue Burgdorf, most con- 
genial; Carolyn Thomas, most in- 
volved in student politics; Jo Ann 
Salter, most studious; Donna Pol- 
lard, most talented; Nancy Clay- 
ton, best personality. 

Miss Potpourri and her court 
will be presented at the Annual 
Potpourri Ball to be held January 
9. 



CHRISTMAS GREETINGS FROM BROADMOOR MERCHANTS 

AND PROFESSIONAL MEN 

it 





Brasher Texaco 

Service Station 



Gunters Shoe Repair 



Garrett Business Machines 



Daisy Shoppe 



George Black Real Estate 
and Insurance 



A. N. Jackson Jr. Bookkeeping 



Broadmoor Gift and Furniture 



Ben Franklins 



Dr. L. J. Plunkett, Jr. M.D. 



United Dollar Store 



Montgomery Ward 
Catalog Store 

Broadmoor Wash a-Rama 

Uhrbach's Studios 



Halpen's Fabric Center 




Broadmoor Barber 

and Beauty Shop 



Exchange Bank & Trust Branch 



DeBlieux's Pharmacy 
Kiddie Kastle 





A & P Food Store 



Auto-Lee 



THE BROADMOOR MERCHANTS WELCOME YOU 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 



Prominent Psychologist Brought To NSC To Evaluate 
Department And Make Suggestions For Improvement 



Dr. Fillmore H. Sanford, a prom- 
inent psychologist, rendered con- 
sultant services in regard to the 
psychology program curriculum, 
facilities and equipment at North- 
western, December 6 and 7. Dr. 
Sanford was selected as the best 
qualified consultant available for 
the purpose. 

Dr. Sanford holds the A.B. de- 
gree from the University of Rich- 
mond, and the masters and Ph.D. 
degrees from Harvard University. 
Among other positions, he has ser- 
ved as a regular member of the 
faculties of psychology depart- 
ments at Harvard University, the 
University of Maryland, Haverford 
College, and the University of 
Texas. 

For several years Sanford serv- 
ed as Executive Secretary of the 
American Psychological Associat- 
ion, thus gaining wide familiarity 
with the field of pscyhology 
throughout the country. 

While on campus, Dr. Sanford 
made a brief, but intensive study 
of the psychology curriculum at 
Northwestern. He observed in- 
struction actually going on, inter- 
viewed students, discussed the 
general qualifications of psychol- 
ogy instructors, and conferred 
with President Kyser and the var- 
ious deans. 

In his oral analysis, Dr. Sanford 
stated that the psychology curric- 
ulum at NSC, including the spe- 
cific content of the general psych- 
ology courses now required of all 
students in the Schools of Applied 
Arts and Sciences and Arts and 
Sciences is typical of that found 
in most of the outstanding psych- 
ology departments throughout the 
country. 

As a warning, however, he com- 
mented that the introductory psy- 
chology course in some institu- 
tions in the past occasionally has 
been allowed to become so highly 
advanced, techincal and demand- 
ing as to be entirely inappropriate 
for freshmen students. He did not 
, indicate any opinion that this is 
true, at present, at Northwestern. 

Dr. Sanford expressed the opin- 
ion that the Psychology Depart- 
ment has not yet done an adequate 
job of making persons in other 
disciplines on the campus aware 
of what psychology does and can 
offer them. In this regard, he 
referred particularly to such dis- 
ciplines as biology, social science, 
physics, business, mathematics, 
and industrial education, although 




ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA 

Friday night Alpha Sigma Alpha 
had a party for the TKE's. We de- 
corated a Christmas tree, and then 
we had hot chocolate and pop corn. 
The TKE boys cut some wood and 
built a fire in the fireplace which 
gave the house quite a Christmas 
atmosphere. 

Saturday morning was spent 
helping the TKE's prepare for sell- 
ing their booth. Saturday night we 
all enjoyed the lighting and all of 
the festivities that were held at the 
river bank. 

Our next project is the collec- 
tion of toys and clothes for the 
patients at Pinecrest State School 
in Pineville. Any clothes or toys 
can be used so please help us help 
others. If you do have anything 
that we can use, please call Ann 
Bloch in Louisiana Hall, and she 
will arrange for someone to come 
and pick it up. 

We are all looking forward to 
the All Greek Carol Sing on De- 
cember 15 and are practicing for 
the big night. 



Dr. Filmore H. Sanford (right) and Dr. Caesar B. Moody, 
head of the department of psychology at Northwestern 
discuss the psychology curriculum. Dr. Sanford was in- 
vited to analyze the psychology department and to offer 
any suggestions for improvement within the department. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
SERVICES 
Old Lemee House 
Jefferson St. 
Every Sunday 11:00 A.M. 
All are welcome 



Greco Addresses 
Seminar Group 

Dr. Edward Greco, research 
scientist with United Gas, was the 
guest speaker at a Microbiology 
Seminar conducted Wednesday in 
Williamson Hall. Dr. Greco spoke 
to the group on the Corrosion of 
Metals by Micro-organisms. 

A graduate of Northwestern, Dr. 
Greco is past president of the Na- 
tional Association of Corrosion En- 
gineers. He has just recently re- 
turned from Russia where he con- 
ducted a group of American 
Scientists through the Soviet 
Union. 



Catering to those who 
care about the health and 
beauty of their hair 

CHARM 
BEAUTY SHOP 

One-half Block 
From The Campus 

Phone 3948 114 Lee St. 
Open Monday Noon Till 
Saturday Noon 



he indicated that the information 
should be adequately communi- 
cated to other persons, in other 
disciplines, as well. 

In conclusion he recommended 
that Northwestern sponsor, with 
the aid of a grant, a major re- 
search project to investigate the 
role of psychology in the total 
curriculum of colleges and uni- 
versities in our area. He strongly 
advised that qualified participants 
from various separate institutions 
and various different fields be 
brought into the project. 



Natchitoches 
Laundromat 

936 College Avenue 

CONVENIENT TO 
ALL STUDENT? 

Open 24 hours a day 
7 days a week 




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i 



COSMETIC GIFT SETS 
Max Factor 
Tussy 
Coty 

MEN'S GIFTS 

OLD Spice Sets 

Pipes 
CANDY by KING'S 
and ELMER'S 





McCLUNG DRUG COMPANY 




FOR THE MAN 
ON YOUR LIST 
SHOP 

NICHOLS INC. 



Slacks by 
HAGGAR 

Size 28-40 
IVY-CONTINENTAL 

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Dress Shirts by 
VAN HEUSEN 

SOLIDS & STRIPES 
Regular Collars 
Snap-Tab Collar 
Size 14-17 

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Sweaters by 
CAMPUS 

CARDIGANS & 
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by 

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Pajamas by 
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TALLS & REGULARS 

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NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 



Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1964 




Winners of second place in intramural football this year 
were the Piney Woods Rooters. The Rooters played the 
Coonies to a 0-0 tie in the first championship game before 
they were beaten in the second game. Members of the 
Rooters are: (left to right) Gary Johnson, Bill Bourn, C. D. 
Worsham, Jimmy Bowen, Mike Wells, and Jon Gibson. 
(Standing) Doug Robinson, Sam Maddox, Randy Webb, Tex 
McLain, and Eugene Noel. 




Pictured above are the winners of this years football intra- 
mural championship. The champs, who go by the name of 
the Coonies, have won the championship for three straight 
years. They are (left to right) first row; Wesley William, 
Monty Rhodes, Tom Baker, Billy Grishmon, Lynn Meyers, 
Ronnie Mouton, and Steve Blount. Second row; Floyd Noel, 
Frank Solis, Kearney Stokes, W. J. Armond, Robert Vin- 
cent, Buddy Carmien, Ralph Tyler. Not shown are Joe 
Rankin, Gary Piper, and Neal Barrymore. 

Coonies Beat Piney Wood Rooters 
To Clinch Intramural Football 



Intramural champions in foot- 
ball for 1964 are the Coonies. The 
Coonies knocked off the Piney 
Woods Rooters by a score of 12-6 
thus winning their third consecu- 
tive championship. 

It was a rough battle for both 
teams as they had to play two 
games before a champion could be 
decided. Under the intramural 
rules, any championship games 
ending in a tie must be replayed. 
This was the case in this situation 
as both clubs fought to a 0-0 tie in 
their first outing. 

Hero of the game was star 
flankerback Ronnie Mouton who 
was playing the game with a dis- 
located elbow. Mouton hauled in 



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the games winning touchdown pass 
that gave the Coonies their victory. 
The Coonies' next game will be in 
the Charity Bowl. Kappa Alpha will 
join forces with the champions to 
oppose Sigma Tau Gamma - B 
Frame. The game will be played 
Wednesday at 6 p. m. in Demon 
Stadium. 



PEOPLES 

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Demons Win Two While Losing One 
During Full Week Of Basketball 



Demons Tree Wildcats 

Northwestern's surprising De- 
mons, led by little Lester Lee, 
made it four wins in a row as they 
downed the surprised Wildcats by 
a score of 62-57. 

Lee sank a total of 18 points and 
grabbed 13 rebounds to take top 
honors in the game. Following in 
a close second was 6'-4" Billy Ray 
who bagged 15 points and brought 
down 11 rebounds. 

The game was not decided until 
the last minutes. The Demons 
trailed most of the first half but 
did manage to get hot and ended 
up trailing by only one point. The 
score was 33-32. The Wildcats 
were not able to hit in the second 
half while the Demons fired away 
at the nets to take an eleven point 
lead, 48-37. La. College began 
finding the range again and fought 
to within two points of the De- 
mons with under two mintes left 
in the game. The clinching basket 
for NSC was made by Lester Lee, 
which preserved the victory. 

Lamar Flies Over Demons 

The Demons of NSC found the 
going rough as they crossed the 
state line to do battle with the 
Lamar Tech Cardinals. A hot 
court press proved to be too much 
for the Demons as they fell bp a 
score of 101-72. 

This was the Demons first loss 
of the year and they now stand at 
4-1. The victory for the Cardinals 
was their second and they now 
stand at 2-1. 

Lamar showed fine team balance 
as eleven players figered in the 
scoring column for them. They 
were led by Jerry Wade who 
poured in 29 points. Jack Lynch 
and Don Bryson were the only 
other Cardinals to finish the night 
in double figures. 

High man for the Demons was 
once again Lester Lee. Lee drop- 
ped in 19 points to run his total 
for the year at 76. Three other 
players ended in double figures 
for the Demons. They were Kenny 
Arthur and Jerry McLaurin with 
13 and Tommy Stewart with 12. 



CHIEF DRIVE-IN 



Now Showing 



Lee Marvin 
In 

'THE KILLERS' 



— plus — 



Don Knotts 
'THE INCREDIBLE 
MR. LIMPET 
Both In Color 



Sun — Mon — Tues 



The Amazing Story of 
America's Greatest Country 
Singer, the Immortal 
Hank Williams 
"YOUR CHEATING HEART' 
George Hamilton 
Susan Oliver 
Red Buttons 



Wednesday — Thursday 
"BUCK NITES" 



'PARIS PICKUP' 



— plus 



Peter Sellers 
'PINK PANTHER' 
Color 



Demons Axe Lumberjacks 

The Demons kept their record 
going Wednesday night of never 
being beat in their own Coliseum 
by downing the SFA Lumberjacks 
by a score of 76-69. 

Northwestern, down by 39-34 at 
the end of the first half, had to 
rally from a 14 point defecit as 
they couldn't do anything hight 
at the beginning of the second 
half. It took just four minutes to 
overcome this as the regulars 
started hitting. 

Once again top men for the 
Demons were Lester Lee and 
Kenny Arthur. They both ended 
the game with 17 points and kept 
the Jacks in confusion as they 
stole the ball numerous times. 
They also proved to be big men 
on the boards as Arthur pulled, 
in eight rebounds and Lee hauled 
in seven. Billy Ray was another 
ployer in double figures as he 
bogged 16. The game aiso saw tne 
return to action of David Clark 
who had been injured with a 
sprained wrist. Clark hit on four 
of ten field goals and made two 
free throws as he also ended in 
double figures with 10. Clark 
snagged six rebounds and blocked 
numerous shots. 

The Demons now go on the road 
for two tilts as they play Nicholls 
State Saturday night and then 
travel to Delta State Monday. 
Northwestern returns home Thurs- 
day to do battle with the Car- 
dinals of Lamar Tech. The game 
will be played in Prather Coli- 
seum. 



FOR SALE 
Smith Corona Portable 
Typewriter — $40.00 
Call Loren Wiley— Ph. 5591 



CANE THEATRE 

Natchitoches, La. Phone 2922 
Friday - Saturday 



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AN AWFRICAN INTERNATIONAL PICTURE 
> • •■•>•••••••••■•••••••*••••••■•••••■ 



Season's Greetings 

From The "Current Sauce" Staff 




urrent 




auce 



VOL. LI— No. 14 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1964 



Sophomore Class President 



DeJean Dropped From Student Council 
For Excessive Number Of Absences 



Meditation 

(To a foreign professor) 
By NANCY AU 

There is a land 1 I'd love to go, 
A land of pines and sparrows in 

the spring, 
A land haunted by autumnal 

typhoon and rain. 
It is a place where the sons 2 of 

King Huang Dwell, 
A place with civilization from 

East and West, 
And a haven for ships around the 

world. 3 

Yet hear invitations from a college 
new, 4 

With eager young men thirst for 

education high. 
There is a place I'd love to teach, 
A college with students a few 

hundreds and more. 5 
A few borrowed classrooms, 

offices. . . . 
Yet with spirit ever new to 

improve 

From fields of study to works 
above, 

For glory of God, and for benefit 
of man. 

So I'll go, far across the Pacific 
With ambition high 

To help, to teach, to bring up 
A generation young, 

For man, for God and for all. 



1. Hong Kong. 2. The Chinese 
people usually consider themsel- 
ves as descendants of their first 
king, Huang, who established his 
kingdom about five thousand years 
ago. 3. Hong Kong is a free port. 

4. Hong Kong Baptist College. 

5. It was a newly established col- 
lege. 



Gantt "Nick" DeJean, sophomore 
class president, was expelled from 
the Northwestern Student Council 
this week for incurring an exces- 
sive number of unexcused absen- 
ces during the semester from the 
council meetings. 

It was brought to the attention 
of the Council by President Steve 
Blount that DeJean had incurred 
four absences thus far this semes- 
ter and that according to the Con- 
stitution of the Student Body As- 
sociation, any member of the Coun- 
cil who accumulates three unex- 
cused absences will automatically 
be dropped from the Council. 

Grounds for this action is found 
in Article 5, Section 3 of the Con- 
stitution. It states "Any member 
of the Council who accumulates 
three unexcused absences from the 
Student Council meetings during 
any one semester shall forfeit his 
seat on the Council; it shall be the 
duty of the president of the As- 
sociation and the Adviser to deter- 
mine whether an absence-excuse is 
valid." 

DeJean had submitted excuses 
for two of his absences, but in the 
opinion of Blount and Dean Dud- 
ley Fulton, faculty adviser to the 
Council, these excuses were not 
valid and therefore they could not 
be accepted. 

Earlier in the semester DeJean 
had been warned about his exces- 
sive absences at a Council meeting. 
At this time he was told that if he 
incurred more than the alloted 
number, he would be dropped from 
the Council. 

In announcing DeJeans expul- 
sion from the Council, Blount said 
that Mike Miller, vice president of 
the sophomore class, will assume 
the duties of class president for 
the remainder of the school year. 



Examination Schedule For Fall, 1964 

Wednesday, January 20, 1965 

8:00-10:30 10 MWF 

12-2:30 2 TT 

3:30-6 LIZ All Sections of English 101 

Thursday, January 21, 1965 

8-10:30 1 MWF 

12-2:30 „ - 12 MWF 

3:30-6 11 MWF 

Friday, January 22, 1965 

8-10:30 8 TTS 

12-2:30 8 MWF 

3:30-8 All Sections of English 100 

and Journalism 202 

Saturday, January 23, 1965 

8-10:30 2 MWF 

12-2:30 9 TTS 

3:30-6 12 TT and 1 TT 

Monday, January 25, 1965 

8-10:30 10 TTS 

12-2:30 9 MWF 

3:30-6 - - 3 TT 

Tuesday, January 26, 1965 

8-10:30 11 TTS 

12-2:30 _ 3 MWF 

(1) Any change from this schedule of examinations must 
have the approval of the appropriate dean. College policy is to 
exempt no student from a final examination. 

(2) Special Study Week begins at 8 a. m., January 13, 
1965. 



NSC Debaters Capture Sweepstake 
At Louisiana Speech Tournament 



Bobby Waldron Receives Fellowship 
For Doctoral Study At Texas A & M 



Assistant Professor Bobby R. 
Waldron of the Northwestern 
Mathematics Department has re- 
ceived notice of his selection as a 
Science Faculty Fellow for a 15 
month period beginning in Sept- 
ember, 1965. 

The Science Faculty Fellowship 
Program was established by the 
National Science Foundation to 
provide an opportunity for college 
and university teachers with three 
or more years of teaching exper- 
ience to increase their competence 
as teachers. 

Awards are made with the ex- 
pectation that the increased com- 
petence gained by the Fellow 
through his fellowship program 
will enable him to contribute more 
effectively to the training and 
motivation of science students and 
thus promote the progress of sci- 
ence and the national welfare. 

Mr. Waldron, in accepting the 
award, agrees to devote his full 
time to the completion of a Doctor 
of Philosophy Degree program in 
Statistics and Numerical Analysis 
at Texas A and M University as 
outlined in his fellowship applicat- 
ion. The fellowship award will pay 
his regular salary for 15 months, 
his tuition, and also provide a 
travel allowance for him to move 
to Texas. 

Waldron received a B.S. degree 
in Mathematics in 1958 from Lou- 
is : ana College, where he graduated 
with distinction and received the 
Kees Mathematics Award. He re- 
ceived a MS degree in mathemat- 
ics from Northwestern in 1961, at 
which time he joined the faculty 
here as an instructor 

Mr. Waldron taught at Bolton 
High School and Louisiana College 
before coming to Northwestern. 
He has received three other Na- 
tional Science Foundation grants. 





Bobby R. Waldron 

The first of these awards enabled 
him to attend a nine week Statis- 
tics Institute at Oklahoma State 
University in 1962, the second was 
to attend a 4 week Conference in 
Computer Programming at the 
University of Southwestern Louis- 
iana in 1963, and the other was to 
attend a 6 week Institute in Com- 
puter Programming and Numerical 
Analysis at Texas A&M University 
in 1964. 



Voice Of Northwestern 

VON, the voice of Northwestern, 
is being broadcast every Friday 
over KNOC radio at 6:45 p.m. This 
fifteen minute program is con- 
ducted by the radio students of 
NSC. VON is concerned with cur- 
rent activities occurring at North- 
western, and it features a different 
campus event each week. 



A tired but happy group of 
Northwestern debators returned to 
the campus Sunday after winning 
the college division sweepstakes 
trophy at the end of the three-day 
festival of the Louisiana Speech 
Association held at the University 
of Southwestern Louisiana in La- 
fayette. 

The festival was attended by 
sixty-three high schools through- 
out the state in addition to the 
various colleges all over Louisi- 
ana. The festival, which ran from 
Dec. 10-12, was divided into three 
different categories of competi- 
tion. They were debate, oratory, 
and oral interpretation. The high 
school division also participated 
in a series of one-act plays. 

Eight students earned points to- 
ward the top sweepstakes honor 
in debates and individual speech 
competition. They were accompan- 
ied to Lafayette by Miss Jayne 
Makar, graduate assistant in the 
speech division of the language 
department. 

Individual results: 

Men's debate — Excellent, Henry 
Mayfield of Covington and Sam 
Shelton of Natchitoches; Good, 
Margaret Montgomery of New Or- 
leans and Milton Tarver of Florien. 

Women's debate — Superior, Lin- 
da Jackson of Shreveport and 
Claire Baeder of Maplewood; Good, 
Paula D. (Cindy) Smith of Natch- 
itoches and Sue Well of Logans- 
port. 

Men's interpretation — Superior, 
Tarver; Excellent, Shelton. 

Women's interpretation — Super- 
ior, Miss Smith; Good, Miss Mont- 
gomery. 

Men's oratory— Excellent, Shel- 
ton; Good, Mayfield. 

Women's oratory — Superior, 
Miss Jackson. 

The NSC debate team and their 
instructors are to be commended 
for their excellent display of tal- 
ent at the festival. They add hon- 
or and prestige to the college and 
the students of Northwestern can 
be proud of them. 




Fullback Claude Patrick, guard Lawrence Nugent, and end Corwyn Aldredge, pictured 
above, have been chosen as members of the All-Gulf States Conference team chosen by the 
coaches of the GSC. These players were members of a 30 player squad named without a 
first or second team being designated. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1964 





Sue Breedlove 

Breedlove, Talbert 
Announce Wedding 

The engagement and approach- 
ing marriage of Eddie Sue Breed- 
love to Glen Talbert was announc- 
ed last week by her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Breedlove of 
Natchitoches. A wedding in the 
First Methodist Church of Natch- 
itoches at seven o'clock in the 
evening Friday, January 29 is be- 
ing planned. 

Eddie Sue is a junior majoring 
in primary education and Glen is 
a graduate student in education 
from Lake Charles. 



Gymnasts To Attend Clinic 

Coach Fred Martinez has an- 
nounced that he will take a six man 
team of gymnasts to the National 
Gymnasts Clinic in Sarasoto, Flori- 
da. The clinic will start on Decem- 
ber 26 and end Dec. 31. 

Members of the Demon team are 
Richard Loyd, Wes McVay, Jack 
Crawford, Joe Williamson, Tom 
Boone, and David Bedard. All are 
top all-around gymnasts except for 
Bedard who specializes in tumb- 
ling. 



SIGMA TAU GAMMA 



Monday night the Sigma Tau 
Gamma Actives had their annual 
active Christmas party. Mr. John- 
son, Sigma Tau adviser, was 
awarded the fraternity advisor pin. 

Sigma Tau has completed plans 
for its New Year's Eve party to 
be held in Shreveport on Decem- 
ber 31. 

New Tau officers have also been 
elected. They are : Eric Stein- 
houser, president; Stuart Graham, 
vice president; Billy Finnicle, sec- 
retary; Jack Hollingshead, trea- 
surer; Jim Hollingsworth, sergeant 
at arms; John Cooper, chaplin; 
and Trigger Allen, pledge trainer. 

The actives and pledges of 
Sigma Tau Gamma extend seasons 
greetings and wishes for a safe 
holiday to the students of North- 
western. 



KAPPA ALPHA 

The actives and pledges of Gam- 
ma Psi Chapter of Kappa Alpha 
held an informal meeting at the El 
Camino Real Restaurant Thursday 
evening to honor Mrs. Vernon C. 
Cloutier. ' 

President Joe Traigle and Sandy 
Corkern, current Rose, presented 
Mrs. Cloutier with the Rose pin, a 
bouquet of roses, the title of Hon- 
orary-Lifetime KA Rose, and a do- 
nation for Pinecrest Institution, 
which her son attends. Mrs. Clou- 
tier not only gave the KA's use of 
her plantation home for the Old 
South Lawn Party, but she has also 
helped and befriended them in 
every possible way. In this way 
the members of Kappa Alpha tried 
to show their appreciation and 
fondness for this great lady. 

The Kappa Alphas had the Child- 
ren's Christmas party Tuesday at 
the East Natchitoches Elementary 
School. It was attended by parents 
of the participating children, 
friends and members of the chap- 
ter, and Mr. Noel of the Special 
Education Department. Presiding 



DELTA ZETA 

Last Monday night, amidst an 
array of stockings, presents, toys, 
and other Christmas decorations, 
Delta Zetas had their annual 
Christmas party. 

The theme for the party was "All 
I Want For Christmas Is A DZ 
House." Toy presents were ex- 
changed between DZ sisters and 
will be sent to needy children for 
Christmas. 

The pledges performed a skit 
for the actives and later served re- 
freshments of cokes and cake. Del- 
ta Zetas ended the seasonal occa- 
sion by singing Christmas carols. 

On Wednesday, Dec. 16, under 
the supervision of Mr. Lee Tarver, 
Epsilon Beta Chapter of Delta Zeta 
visited the Natchitoches Geriatrics 
Home. Christmas carols were sung 
by the group accompanied by uku- 
leles. Delta Zetas enjoyed this visit 
with the senior citizens of Natchi- 
toches. 

Delta Zeta furnished the refresh- 
ments for the party which the Eu- 
thenics Club had for Mrs. Jimmy 
Scruggs children's class. The party 
was held in Campti on Dec. 11. 

Thanks is extended to the Pan- 
hellanic Council by Delta Zeta 
sorority for treating Greeks and 
their dates to a dance last Friday 
night. 

Delta Zetas are anticipating a 
great year in '65 and are looking 
forward to the building of the DZ 
lodge in the near future. 



as Santa Claus was John "Otto" 
Thompson who had as helpers the 
various members of the pledge 
class. 

Tim Miciotto and the social com- 
mittee have completed plans for 
the KA Alumni-Sponsored New 
Year's Eve Dance to be held De- 
cember 31 at 9 p. m. in the Arts 
and Hobbies Building of the State 
Fair Grounds in Shreveport. Music 
will be supplied by "Slim Harpo 
and His Band." 



Student Council 
Minutes 

The regular meeting of the NSC 
Student Council was held at 6 p.m. 
in Bullard Hall. The meeting was 
called to order by President Steve 
Blount. The minutes of the pre- 
vious meeting were read and ap- 
proved. 

Parliamentarian Roy Corley 
read Article V, Section 3 of the 
Constitution of the Student Body 
Association. "Any member of the 
Council who accumulates three un- 
excused absences from the Student 
Council meetings during any one 
semester shall forfeit his seat on 
the Council; it shall be the duty of 
the President of the Association 
and the Adviser to determine 
whether an absence-excuse is va- 
lid." Under Article 5, Section 3, 
Nick DeJean forfeits his seat on 
the council because of an excessive 
number of unexcused absences. 
Blount also pointed out that seve- 
ral of the freshman associates had 
an excessive number of absences. 
Stan Branton moved that Doug 
Giles be a tentative member of the 
Council the remainder of this se- 
mester due to his inability to at- 
tend meetings because of a class. 
Second by Pat Holley. Motion pass- 
ed. 

J. O. Charrier reported that the 
elections board had met. The board 
decided to follow the policy of 
having students show their I. D. 
cards when they vote. This will 
eliminate the possibility of anyone 
voting for another person. 

Calbert Marcantel reported that 
The Checkmates will play for a 
free dance given by the Council 



Wilkinson, Lipsey 
To Attend Meeting 

The Northwestern Chapter of Pi 
Omega Pi, national honorary busi- 
ness fraternity, will send two dele- 
gates to the Nineteenth Biennial 
Delegate Convention in Chicago, 
Dec. 28-30. 

Attending from Northwestern 
will be Coletta Wilkinson and Wil- 
bur Ellis Lipsey, both junior busi- 
ness education majors. 

Members of the fraternity must 
be majoring in business, have at 
east a "B" average in business sub- 
jects, an overall "C" average, and 
must have completed at least 15 
semester hours in business and al- 
lied subjects. Sponsor of the NSC 
chapter is Mr. H. N. Towry. 

Officers include Jeffery Austin, 
president; Jesse McWilliams, vice 
president; Mary Beth McGee, sec- 
retary; R. J. Ardoin, treasurer; 
Rita Bernard, chaplin; and Wilbur 
Lipsey, reporter. 



from 4:30-6:30 Thursday, Decem- 
ber 17. 

J. O. Charrier reminded the 
Council of the appearance of Rich- 
ard & Jim Tuesday, December 15. 
Wayne Meachum will sell tickets 
from 7-8 p. m. at the coliseum. 

The AWS will have a Valentine 
Dance February 12. Carolyn Thom- 
as moved that the Council furnish 
a band for the dance. Second by 
Calbert Marcantel. Motion passed. 

There being no further business, 
Betty Moore moved the meeting be 
adjourned. Second by Stan Bran- 
ton. Meeting adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Carolyn Thomas 



Euthenics Club Initiates, Has Party 



The Euthenics Club held their 
annual departmental Christmas 
party and initiation in the living 
room of the Home Ec. building 
December 10. Thirteen new mem- 
bers were welcomed into the club 
by Miss Roberson, club sponsor, 
and by the officers with an im- 
pressive candle light ritual. Betty 
DeWitt, first vice-president, then 



presented a program which show- 
ed different views of Christmas. 

Several members of the club 
helped give a Christmas party to 
the children of Mrs. Jimmy 
Scruggs' class in Campti on De- 
cember 11. Stockings containing 
gifts were presented to the child- 
ren, and records were given to aid 
in better classroom instruction. 



From the Bonks 
of 

Natchitoches 




The 



PEOPLES BANK 

and Trust Company 



CITY BANK 

and Trust Company 



EXCHANGE BANK 

and Trust Company 

Broadmoor Drive-In Branch 




FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1964 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



Northwestern Dance Group Performs Throughout State 




Shown in a lecture demonstration on Dance in Education, given by the 
Contemporary Dancers of Northwestern for the Louisiana Teachers Associa- 
tion convention held in Shreveport this fall are members of the club and its 
advisers. Pictured in "Juldancer," a Swedish Christmas dance, are (left to 
right) Eugene Noel, Carol Adkins, Eugene Cox, Stina Hellberg, Ricky Evans, 



Peggy Martin, Bob Foster, and Julia Mahoney. Demonstrating another type 
of movement n the same dance are Eugene Noel, Julia Mahoney, Stina 
Hellberg, and Ricky Evans. The picture on the right shows Mary Lawless 
and Eugene Cox, dancers of a modern tap routine to "How You Gonna Keep 
'Em Down on the Farm." 



Contemporary Dancers Present Shows; 
Are Planning Two More This Year 



The Contemporary Dancers, 
directed by Dr. Colleen Nelken of 
the health and physical education 
department and her assistant 
Peggy Martin, have completed two 
of their annual projects and are 
preparing two more projects for 
the future. 

The first public performance of 
the year was a lecture demonstra- 
tion on dance in education for the 
Louisiana Association of Health, 
Physical Education and Recrea- 



tion on November 23 at the LTA 
convention in Shreveport. 
group techniques were illustrated 
by the ensemble. The square 
dance was demonstrated by the 
dances "Catch All Eight" and 
"Sides Divide;" the tap dance by 
"How You Gonna Keep 'em Down 
on the Farm." Swedish Christmas 
dances were representative of the 
folk dances. A modern dance was 
coreographed by Stina Hellburg to 
the music of Castor and Pollux. 



Miss Hellburg, a graduate stu- 
dent in physical education from 
Finland, presented a concert De- 
cember 4 as a partial requirement 
for the Masters degree. She is a 
graduate of Gamlakarleby Svenska 
Samlyceum (high school), Gym- 
nastics Institution at Helsingfors 
University (teacher's college), 
Sevenska Flicklyceeti Helsingfors 
(student teaching), Approbatur in 
Pedagogy and Education at Turku 
University for one year, and was 
employed as a regular teacher at 
Svenska Flicklyceeti Helsingfors 
for a year. 

For the concert she choreo- 
graphed "Movement," "Teeln- 




Portraying the mountain folk of America at the "Saturday Nite Hoedown" are members 
of the club, (left to right) Eugene Noel, Carol Adkins, Eugene Cox, Stina Hellberg, Ricky 
Evans, Peggy Martin, Bob Foster, and Julia Mahoney. This was one of two square 
dances given at the LTA demonstration. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
SERVICES 
Old Lemee House 
Jefferson St. 
Every Sunday 1 1 :00 A.M. 
All are welcome 



Catering to those who 
care about the health and 
beauty of their hair 

CHARM 
BEAUTY SHOP 

One-half Block 
From The Campus 

Phone 3948 114 Lee St. 
Open Monday Noon Till 
Saturday Noon 



NEW SERVICE AVAILABLE 

Quick service drycleaning and shirt laundering is 
now offered at Community Cleaners & Shirt Laundry 
located at 103 Second Street. 

Drycleaning in by 10 A. M. may be picked up by 
5 P. M. the same day Monday - Saturday with pressing 
while you watt. 

Shirts in one day to include Friday may be picked 
up by 5 P. M. the following day. 



COMMUNITY CLEANERS AND 
SHIRT LAUNDRY 



Phone 2229 



103 Second St. 



agers," and "Sacrifice." Miss Hell- 
burg also danced in some of the 
presentations. 

As a tribute to the annual Nat- 
chitoches Christmas Festival, a 
suite of dances was presented.* 
These 'included "Juldancer," 
"Snow Scene," " Santa's Helpers," 
and "Fireworks." 

Combined with groups in drama, 
music and speech, the Contempor- 
ary Dancers will present a Christ- 
mas Assembly. 

In February, the group will par- 
ticipate in the Louisiana College 
Dance Symposium to be held at 
Southeastern Louisiana College in 
Hammond. Highlights of the Sym- 
posium will be the visit of Erick 
Hawkins, a prominent dancer, and 



Blanch Duff Packer, dance educa- 
tor and Michigan Dance Chairman. 

The Symposium is held annually 
at one of the six member colleges. 

Members of the Contemporary 
Dancers are Carol Adkins, costume 
director; Janie Armstrong, Mar- 
garet Carroll, Joan Denham, Mary 
Gilson, Phyllis Guidry, secretary- 
treasurer; Stina Hellberg and Ced- 
ric Hudgens. 

Mary Lawless; Barbara Lloyd; 
Julia Mahoney; Gwen Marler; Max- 
ine Mifflin; Betty Morgan, costume 
coordinator; Wavelyn Murray; 
Margaret Montgomery; Jane Plum; 
Betsy Pugh; Ramona Reynolds, 
vice-president; Faye Rivers; Linda 
Smith; and Judy Winn, president. 



P & C Drug 
Store 



CANOE 




a man's aftershave, after bath cologne 
made, bottled, sealed In France.„*5,*8.50, *14. 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1964 



PASSING IN REVIEW 




By Ernie Harris 



The Men's Rifle Team placed 
fourth in the meet at Ft. Polk this 
past Saturday. Cadet John Sills 
was high man for the team with 
345x400 possible. Considering the 
conditions, the team made a good 
showing . Some of the schools re- 
presented were: LSU, Loyola 
and Southern University. The 
Rifle Team will start practicing 
next semester Monday thru Friday 
from 4 to 5:30 p.m. With the 
additionial practice unde the co- 
aching of Sgt. Fiveash(RA) I am 
sure our team will show a marked 
improvement. The members of the 
Rifle Team are designated by the 
yellow cord that they wear on 
their uniforms. Any members of 
the ROTC interested in firing may 
come down and try out for the 
team. 

The Association of United States 
Army(AUSA) held a meeting this 
past Wednesday night. The main 
purpose of the meeting was to dis- 
cuss the manuvers that will be 
held in the spring semester. The 
manuver last year was lovingly 
called "Operation Mud-hole". I 
wonder if the weather had any- 
thing to do with this title? The 
members of the AUSA are desig- 
nated by blue and gold cords on 
their uniforms. 

The Black Knights have offici- 
ally received and accepted an in- 
vitation to the Southern Invitat- 
ional Drill Team Meet. This event 
will be March 20th at LSU in 
Baton Rouge. The Knights have 
been working on some new rout- 
ines to use at LSU. I haven't had 
a chance to see the routines yet, 
but I have heard that they are 
more intricate than the routines 
being used presently. 

Cadet Sgt. William Drapper 



PEOPLES 

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Hair Coloring 
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visit 

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Call 4536 

Closed Mondays 
See 

Tressie - Elsie - Irma 
Jean - Linda 

201 EAST Third Street 
Across from Warrens Mkt. 



from Shreveport was chosen 
CADET OF THE WEEK. William 
is a sophomore, majoring in Bus. 
Admin. Cadet Drapper is now serv- 
ing as squad leader with Head- 
quarters Company. These cadets 
are graded on headdress, shoe- 
shines, general orders, overall 
military bearing and appearance, 
etc. Cadet Sgt. Drapper made a 
perfect score in all categories. 
Congratulation Cadet Sgt. Drapper 



Thomas Captures 
Badminton Title 

Dr. Charles (Red) Thomas won 
his third consecutive title in the 
men's singles in badmitton by 
defeating Dr. Duane Slaughter in 
the tenth annual Louisiana Open 
Badmitton Tournament held in the 
Men's Gym Friday and Saturday. 
Both of these men have been com- 
peting for the title for several 
years. 

Dr. Thomas also won the veter- 
ans men's doubles as he teamed up 
with Harold Clark of Dallas. 

Virginia Hicks of Denton, Texas 
won the women's singles as she de- 
feated last years champion Andrea 
Farrow of NSC. Both of the ladies 
combined to take the women's 
double title. 

In the college division, Robert 
Crew of NSC won the men's 
singles and teamed with Larry 
Fisher to take the doubles. 



NSC Demons Split 
Pair During Week 

Demons Dump Nichols 

The Demons of NSC, led by big 
Sam Watts, scored their sixth vic- 
tory of the year as they downed 
Nichols State by a score of 63-53. 
Watts was the game's high scorer 
as he poured in 19 points. He also 
proved to be a big man on the 
boards as he hauled in 16 re- 
bounds. 

NSC had trouble geting started 
in the first half but was able to 
stay within one point of the Col- 
onels at the end of the half. They 
trailed by a 29-28 score. 

Billy Ray and Lester Lee also 
ended in double figures for the 
Demons. Ray ended the game with 
16 points while Lee finished with 
10. 

Delta Rolls By Demons 

Delta State handed the Demons 
their second defeat of the year 
Monday night as they breezed to 
a 78-59 victory. The height of the 
Mississippi club proved to be too 
much for the Demons as the score 
was 6-0 before Northwestern was 
able to register a score on the 
scoreboard. The Demons were 
down at the end of the half by a 
score of 35-24. 

Once again the Demons had 
three players in double figures. 
They were Sam Watts, Lester Lee, 
and Kenny Arthur. Lee and Watts 
tied for top honors for the Demons 
with 14 points apiece. Arthur fin- 
ished with 12. The loss brought 
the Demons record to 6-2. 



Watt Sets Record In AAU Track Meet; 
Receives Invitation To Run In New York 



Eddie Watt, NSC's fabulous 
cross country track runner, was 
winner in the Southern AAU cross 
country championship held in New 
Orleans last Saturday. 

Watt completed the four mile 
course in a record breaking 19:29. 
This time was good enough to 
break the old record of 19:53 held 
by Malcolm Robinson of USL. 

Another NSC runner, Tony 



CHIEF DRIVE-IN 



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Typewriter — $40.00 
Call Loren Wiley— Ph. 5591 



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'THE NIGHT OF 
THE IGUANA" 
Richard Burton 



Ward of Ireland, finished third in 
the meet with a time of 21:09. 

Watt has received offers to com- 
pete in the Sugar Bowl meet to be 
held in New Orleans and has also 
been invited to participate in a 
major meet in New York City. 



DON 
Theatre 

BOX OFFICE OPENS 

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Sat. & Sun. 12:45 



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auce 



VOL. LI— No 15 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Nominations For Who's Who Returned 
31 NSC Seniors Have Been Accepted 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 1965 



Dean Dudley Fulton announced 
that the nominations of thirty-one 
Northwestern seniors have been 
accepted by the national committee 
for selection of the names to be 
published in the "Who's Who 
Among Students in American Uni- 
versities and Colleges. Theese stu- 
dents will have their names pub- 
lished in the national directory, 
one of the highest honors accorded 
to American college students. 

When nominating students for 
Mr. and Miss NSC, the various or- 
ganizations and dormitories were 
advised that from these nomina- 
tions the basic list of nominees for 
"Who's Who" would be formed. 
Then a student committee com- 
posed of juniors and representa- 
tives from the Student Personnel 



Office reviewed the nominees. The 
list was then sent to a faculty com- 
mittee for a final review before 
submitting the names to the na- 
tional committee for approval. 

Those nominated and approved 
are: Ron Alexander, Becky Alphin, 
Carolyn Bellue, Jimmy Berry, 
Georgia Blair, Steve Blount, Nancy 
Clayton, Patricia Cooper, W. O. 
Crain, Jr., Patsy Gaspard, Lucy 
Hart, Gary Johnson, John Lewis, 
Sam Lucero, and Irby McCan. 

Jeanie Marler, Barbara Martin, 
James Maxwell, Chris Newsome, 
J. W. Phillips, Tommy Putnam, 
Charles Ragus, Ray Robicheaux, 
Joanne Salter, Kate Thibodeaux, 
Joe Traigle, Jean Walker, Duffy 
Wall, Melinda Watkins, Randy 
Webb, and John Weffenstette. 



Berry, Martin Named Mr., Miss NSC 



Annual Lady Of the Bracelet Pageant 
Scheduled To Be Held Friday Night 



The Lady of the Bracelet Pa- 
geant, sponsored by the North- 
western Potpourri, will be held 
Friday night at 8 in the Fine Arts 
Auditorium. The thirty coeds to 
be featured in the pageant were 
selected on December 17 by a group 
of judges composed of townspeople 
and faculty members. The judges 
choose from nominations by each 
dormitory. 

The thirty finalists are Glenda 
Abney, Jeanie Behm, Georgia 
Blair, Vida Broussard, Nina Bur- 
lile, Nancy Clayton, Ann Cleve- 
land, Suzanne Dalme, Shirley Kay 
Dalme, Mary Elias, Janice Fonte- 
not, Gloria Hough, Barbara House. 
Ann Lambre, and Thelee Levee. 

Suzanne Maynard, Margie Mur- 
phy, Pat Pace, Wanda Radford, 
Cynthia Reneau, Una Roach, Pam 
Slack,, Betty Thomas, Carolyn 
Thomas, Patricia Unrath, Jean 
Walker, Rae Bell Warner, and 
Jeannie Watson. 

These will be judged on person- 



ality, poise, facial and figure 
beauty as they appear in evening 
gowns by six outstanding judges: 
Mrs. Lou Freeman, Mrs. Mary Jo 
Webb, Mr. George Lewis, Miss Lois 
Bartlett, and Mr. and Mrs. C. Drew 
Willingham. 

Mrs. Freeman is a member of 
the executive committee for the 
Miss Louisiana Pageant and serves 
on the national advisory committee 
for the Miss America contest. 

Mrs. Webb is the wardrobe co- 
ordinator for the Miss Louisiana 
entry in the Miss America pageant 
and the wardrobe consultant for 
the Miss Louisiana Pageant. 

Mr. Lewis is a member of the 
business department and Miss 
Bartlett is an instructor of voice in 
the speech department at NSC. 

Mrs. Willingham is the manag- 
ing direotor of the Willingham 
Finishing and Modeling School of 
Shreveport. Mr. Willingham is 
vice-president of the E. L. Burns 
Company in Shreveport. 




SLTA Will Have 
Guest Speaker At 
Meeting Thursday 

Mr. James DeLee, supervisor of 
teacher education in the State De- 
partment of Education, will speak 
on "The Responsibilities of the 
Louisiana State Department of 
Education in Regard to Teacher 
Education and Certification," at 
the January meeting of the SLTA, 
Thursday. 

Mr. DeLee is from Jackson, Lou- 
isiana. He has a B. S. and M.Ed, 
from the Louisiana State Univer- 
sity. He has taught in the parishes 
of Plaquemines, East Baton Rouge 
and Calcasieu; and at McNeese 
State and Louisiana College. 




The Royal Family Of The Guitar 
To Perform Here Monday Night 



The fabulous Romeos, "the Roy- 
al Family of the Guitar," will ap- 
pear in the Fine Arts Auritorium, 
Monday, Jan. 11 at 8 p.m. as the 
third attraction of the Northwest- 
ern-Natchitoches Concert Associa- 
tion. 

Practically a national institution 
in their native Spain, the Romeos 
left there in 1957 and eventually 
settled in Los Angeles, Calif. Their 
first American tour included two 
New York recitals, a performance 
for the New York Philharmonic 
Society, a concert at the Seattle 
World's Fair, three network tele- 
vision appearances and recordings 
for Mercury Records. 

This season they will play 70 



concerts with a late January app- 
earance on NBC's Tonight show and 
on Feb. 7 will be the first guitarists 
to play in Philharmonic Hall, Lin- 
coln Center. 

The Romeros family which in- 
cludes the father Celedonia and 
his sons Celin, Pepe, and Angel, 
perform a wide range of the guitar 
literature from the 16th century 
Spanish Baroque to Albeniz, as well 
as the art of Flamenco. Celedonia 
Romero has been the only teacher 
of his sons. 

Individual concert tickets are 
$4.40 for adults and $2.20 for child- 
ren. Students will be admitted on 
I.D. cards. 



Math Instructor 
To Speak At NSC 

Dr. James R. Garrett, manager 
of mathematical services for the 
RCA Service Company at Cape 
Kennedy, Florida, will be on the 
Northwestern campus January 14 
and 15. 

Dr. Garrett will deliver a lee- 
ture at 1 p. m. Thursday in Room 
108 of Williamson Hall. The title 
of this lecture will be "Large-Scale 
Computers and Range Instru- 
ments." He will also give a lecture 
on "The Role of Mathematicians in 
portunities" at 11 a. m. Friday in 
Room 20 of Caldwell Hall. All in- 
terested persons are invited to at- 
tend those lectures. They will not 
be of a highly technical nature. 

Dr. Garrett's visit is at the in- 
vitation of the mathematics de- 
partment under the Visiting 
Scientists Lectureship Program 
conducted by the Society for In- 
dustrial and Applied Mathema- 
tics. This program is supported by 
the National Science Foundation. 



Government Jobs 
Open To Seniors 

Students interested in a career 
in the government service who will 
receive their bachelor's degree in 
June are offered an opportunity 
to apply for fellowships to study at 
three different universities. Each 
fellowship has a total value of 
$3000. The stipend is $2500 and the 
remainder of the grant consists of 
fees and tuition at the three co- 
operating universities. 

For information and applica- 
tions, students should write to 
Coleman B. Ransone, educational 
director, Southern Regional Train- 
ing Program in Public Administra- 
tion, Drawer I, University, Ala- 
bama. The deadline for submittfcig 
applications is March 1, 1965. 



Northwestern Coed 
Holiday Fatality 

Northwestern suffered its fourth 
fatality this semester recently when 
Nina Bell Atchison, a freshman at 
Northwestern, was killed in an auto 
collision near her home in Lees- 
ville. Also killed in the accident 
was Mrs. E. H. Atchison, the 
mother of the Northwestern coed. 

Miss Atchison was traveling in 
the car along with her mother and 
two brothers who were injured 
and taken to the Army hospital at 
Fort Polk. The two brothers are 
not reported to be in serious condi- 
tion. 

The family was returning from 
New Orleans where they had gone 
to meet one of the brothers who 
was returning home from Germany 
for the Christmas holidays. They 
had made the entire trip and were 
just seventeen miles from their 
home when the accident occurred. 
The accident happened on Dec. 23 
and the funeral was conducted on 
Christmas day. 



Dean Dudley Fulton, at the 
annual college Christmas assembly 
December 18, announced the se- 
lection of Jimmy Berry and Bar- 
bara Martin as Mr. and Miss NSC 
for 1965. 

The announcement was made 
prior to commencement of the 
Christmas pageant and brought a 
thunderous ovation from the en- 
tire student body. 

The pair was elected from a 
field of ten candidates in an all- 
college election Tuesday Nov. 24. 
The candidates were nominated by 
the dormitories on the basis of 
scholarship, leadership, character, 
integrity, loyalty, participation in 
activities, and service to North- 
western. 

Martin Honored 

Miss Martin is truly worthy of 
the honor as is evidenced by the 
many offices and positions held by 
her. A primary education major 
from Minden, Barbara is serving 
as Purple Jacket president, senior 
class secretary, senior counselor, 
BSU Hostess, a member of SLTA, 
Neptune Club, and Kappa Delta 
Pi. She was elected as both out- 
standing freshman as well as up- 
perclassman by the AWS, and 
chosen as a sophomore counselor. 
She served as president of the or- 
ganization for the year 1963-64 
and as recording secretary the pre- 
vious year. Barbara was freshman 
class secretary and Student Coun- 
cil associate. 

Berry Holds Positon 

Mr. NSC, Jimmy Berry also had 
his hands full as he proudly serves 
the senior class as their president. 
Jimmy is an upper elementary edu- 
cation major from Winnfield. His 
senior presidential position is not 
exactly new to him as he also serv- 
ed as president of his freshman 
class. He is an officer in the Blue 
Key, a local and state officer of 
SLTA, and a member of the Stu- 
dent Council. 





Pictured above is part of the charred remains of Fournet 
Hall which was damaged by fire during the holidays. The 
fire was discovered by the Campus Security and estimates 
of the damage or when it will be ready for use again are 
not available. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 1965 



Sigma Tau Officers 




Recently elected officers of the Sigma Tau Gamma social 
fraternity for the coming year are from left to right Eric 
Steinhauser, president; Stuart Graham, vice-president; 
Bill Finical, secretary; Jack Hollingshead, treasurer; Jim 
Hollingsworth, sergeant-at arms; and John Cooper, chap- 
lain. 



KA Honors Mrs. Cloutier 



Joe Traigle, Kappa Alpha president, presents Mrs. Beth 
Cloutier with a bouquet of roses, a rose pin and a check 
for Pinecrest Institution. 



Greek Talk 



SIGMA TAU GAMMA 

Sigma Tau Gamma outscored 
Kappa Alpha 12-0 in the Charity 
Bowl Foootball game, December 
16, in a hard fought contest. The 
Tau's had their New Year's Eve 
dance at the North Highland's 
V.F.W. club house. 

Upcoming on the Tau calendar 
is its annual White Rose Ball. At 
this spring formal, Sigma Tau's 
new Rose will be presented for 
the first time as the present Rose, 
Miss Cecilia Shea, steps down after 
her year's reign. It is customary 
for the Tau's to present their dates 
with favors. 




KAPPA ALPHA 

Mrs. Beth Cloutier was made 
permanent Kappa Alpha Rose by 
the Gamma Psi Chapter at a recent 
celebration in the El Camino Rest- 
aurant. Mrs. Cloutier was present- 
ed with a dozen red roses, a Kappa 
Alpha rose pin, and a check for the 
Pinecrest Institution which her 
son attends. 

A long-standing friend of this 
chapter, Mrs. Cloutier has given 
much of her time in helping Kappa 
Alpha. The chapter has been given 
much of her time in helping Kappa 
Alpha. The chapter has been given 
the use of her plantation for par- 
ties, bar-b-ques, and the Old South 
Ball. The Order would like to pub- 
licly thank Mrs. Cloutier for all 
her help in the past year. 

Kappa Alpha's alumni advisor, 
Mr. Joe Lewis, sponsored a shrimp 
boil at the El Camino Restaurant 
Tuesday for the actives and pledges 
of the chapter. 

In attendance at the dinner was 
Brother James Ryberg, regional ad- 
viser of the order. Brother Ryberg 
met with the officers and then at- 
tended the regular meeting earlier 
in the evening. He reported that 
he was pleased with the progress 
of the chapter. 

Gammi Psi will observe Convi- 
vum, celebration in honor of Robert 
E. Lee and the founding of the or- 
der, on January 16 at the El Cami- 
no. Brother John W. Nowell, 
Knight Commander of Kappa Al- 
pha, will visit the chapter for this 
Centennial celebration. 

During the Christmas Holidays 
j the brothers enjoyed two parties, 
the biggest being the New Year's 
Eve dance featuring Slim Harpo. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
SERVICES 
Old Lemee House 
Jefferson St. 
Every Sunday 11:00 A.M. 
All are welcome 



Patronize 

Our 
Advertisers 




For Good 
Hair Coloring 
Shaping 
Styling 

<cisit 



TRESS1ES 
Beauty Salon 

in 

East Natchitoches 
Call 4536 

Closed Mondays 
See 

Tressie - Elsie - Irma 
Jean - Linda 

201 EAST Third Street 
Across from Warrens Mkt. 



Malts 



Frosted Drinks 
Hamburgers 
Southern Maid Do-Nuts 



Visit 



ZESTO 



For Free Delivery To Dorm Call — 2385 



NEW SERVICE AVAILABLE 

Quick service drycleaning and shirt laundering is 
now offered at Community Cleaners & Shirt Laundry 
located at 103 Second Street. 

Drycleaning in by 10 A. M. may be picked up by 
5 P. M. the same day Monday - Saturday with pressing 
while you wait. 

Shirts in one day to include Friday may be picked 
up by 5 P. M. the following day. 



COMMUNITY CLEANERS AND 
SHIRT LAUNDRY 



SIGMA KAPPA 

The Christmas holidays started 
started off for the Sigma Kappa 
girls with a big party. Here they 
exchanged gifts and had refresh- 
ments. 

In the near future the initiation 
of this semester pledges will take 
place. The date will be announced 
later. 

The girls would like to wish the 
students a Happy New Year and 
hope that everyone had a most 
enjoyable Christmas. 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 

The local Teke chapter elected 
permanent officers Tuesday night 
at their weekly meeting. Officers 
elected were: President, Walter 
Pilcher; Vice-president, Tom Row- 
an; Secretary, Mike Beer; Treasu- 
rer, Jeff Murphy. These officers 
will serve throughout the remain- 
der of the fall semester, and also 
during the spring semester. 

Miss Julie Frazier, 4-1, was pre- 
sented with the traditional bouquet 
of flowers, honoring her as Teke 
Sweetheart for the month of De- 
cember. Julie is a member of Alpha 
Sigma Alpha, a sorority which has 
devoted a great deal of time to 
helping TKE in its various activ- 
ities. 

Ted Fowler, a very capable or- 
ganizer, was appointed rush chair- 
man for the spring semester rush. 
Under his leadership Teke looks 
forward to a very successful rush. 



PI KAPPA PHI 

We closed the old year, 1964, 
very pleased with our progress. 
Happiness reigned throughout the 
fraternity. Our Rose Ball was suc- 
cessful and was highlighted by 
having Miss Judy Winn remain as 
our sweetheart for 1965. 

Miss Virginia Stephens has run 
away with Larry Bucknum's heart 
and his pin. Pleased are the broth- 
ers that he is so lucky. 

Officers have been installed 
with Shelton Eubanks, president; 
Larry Bucknum, treasurer; Teddy 
Barter, secretary; Chris Docolas, 



SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA 

Tri Sigmas are proud to report 
a considerable profit from sales 
made at the booth during the 
Christmas Festival. Also in the 
Christmas spirit, the annual 
Christmas party was held on De- 
pledges presenting a gift to faculty 
sponsor, Miss Eve Mouton. A large 
braided rug was also given to the 
house as a Christmas gift from 
members and pledges. 

Pledges were surprised with 
special gifts from their big sisters- 
drop letters! A special thanks to 
everyone who helped make the 
Christmas Festival and annual 
Christmas party a success. 

During the holidays a tea for 
Tri Sigmas and their mothers was 
held in Shreveport at the home of 
the national vice-president, Mrs. 
Erin Orton. Sigmas from Shreve- 
port, Alexandria, Natchitoches, 
and Bossier City shared in this 
holiday get-together. Sigmas sp- 
read cheer in Natchitoches by giv- 
ing a basket of food and clothes to 
a needy family. 

Hats off to Melinda Watkins, 
Tri Sigma's president, who was re- 
cently elected Miss Potpourri. She 
and her court will be presented at 
the Potpourri Ball on January 9. 

Congratulations also to Judy 
Gowland, who has been elected 
Honorary Captain in the ROTC, 
and special recognition to Georgia 
Blair, Shirley Kay Dalme, Bunny 
Unrath, and Margie Murphy, who 
are all finalists in the Lady of the 
Bracelet pageant to be held Jan- 
uary 8. 

Five Sigma Seniors will be leav- 
ing this semester and they will be 
honored at Senior Send-On on Jan- 
uary 17. Seniors leaving are Geor- 
gia Blair, Jackie McLamore, Pat 
Cooper, Lynelle Ford, and Mary 
Stuart. 

All Sigmas are making a new 
year's resolution to see that their 
little sisters do well on pledge 
tests and make good grades so 
that all will be initiated next se- 
mester. 



pledge master; and Bill Thompson, 
historian and senior member ad- 
visor. The pledges have been very 
active under pledge president 
Charlie Brown with a charity drive. 
They collected old clothes and toys 
for the needy. The actives are very 
proud of them. 



Phone 2229 



1 03 Second St. 



Chicken DINNERS 

PREPARED WITH ROCK CORNISH FRYERS 

All Dinners Served With HOT ROLLS, HONEY, 
PICKLE SLICE, Choice of FRENCH FRIES or 
SNOWFLAKE POTATOES with CREAM GRAVY 



No. 1 — Regular Order, Three Pieces $1.00 

No. 2— All White Order, Four Pieces 1.40 

No. 3— Half Chicken, Four Pieces 1.25 

No. 4— One Half All White, Two Pieces .90 

No. 5 — One-Half Regular, Two Pieces, All Dark .80 

No. 6 — Giblet, Assorted 90 

No. 7 — Livers, Six 1.15 

No. 8 — Gizzards, Eight 75 

No. 9— All Thighs, Three 1.10 

No. 10 — All Drumsticks, Four 1.05 

No. 11 — Kiddies' Order, Two Drumsticks 70 

No. 12 — One Chicken To Take Out, No Giblets 2.40, 

EL CAMINO RESTAURANT 

1000 College Avenue 
Across from Northwestern State College 
Phone 4083 Natchitoches, La. 

BOXES TO TAKE OUT 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 1965 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



Demon Football Award Winners 




NSC-SFA Football Game Is Cancelled; 
State Law Prohibits Integrated Play 



Recipients of the honors given at the Annual Football Banquet are from left to right 
(Row 1): Grover Colvin, Permanent Team Captain; Al Dodd, Outstanding Defensive 
Back; and James Aymond, Outstanding Offensive Back. (Row 2) Allen Plummer, Out- 
standing Defensive Lineman; Dick Reding, Jordan and Booth Award; Gerald Long, 
Coaches Award; Fred Fulton, Outstanding Offensive Lineman; and Don Beasley, 
Most Valuable Player and Permanent Team Captain. 



Officials of Northwestern and 
Stephen F. Austin College of Na- 
cogdoches, Texas, announced re- 
cently in a joint statement that the 
annual football series between the 
Demons and the Lumberjacks, 
scheduled for the past six years in 
Shreveport's State Fair Stadium, 
will be discontinued effective im- 
mediately. 

Sylvan Nelken, Dean of Admin- 
istration at Northwestern at North- 
western, said that he had received 
word from Stephen F. Austin auth- 
orities that it would "not be to our 
best interests to go ahead and ne- 
gotiate a future contract." 

Nelken added: "We had a two- 
year contract with Stephen F. Aus- 
tin. It expired in 1964 so it is not 
a question of cancellation." 

The reason for the termination 
of the series was brought out in a 
statement by Dr. Ralph W. Steen, 
president of Stephen F. Austin, 
who sent a telegram to President 
John S. Kyser of Northwestern 
State regarding that matter. "We 
intend to use colored boys next 
year and Northwestern doesn't, 
and we don't intend to leave these 
players at home. It has been a long 
and pleasant relationship but we 
think it is the best thing to do." 
Northwestern's Athletic Director 



38 Football And Eight Cross Country 
Letters Awarded At Athletic Banquet 



Athletic director Jack Clayton 
has announced that there were 38 
players receiving letters for this 
years Demon football squad. There 
were also letters for four student 
managers and trainers and eight 
cross-country track team letters. 

Football lettermen were: Donnie 
Carroll, Mike Creel, Kenny Guil- 
ot, Gary Pittman, and Charles Ra- 
gus of Shreveport; Richard Ber- 
litz, Dick Reding, and Wayne Walk- 
er of Bossier; Robert Foster, Eddie 
Mittelbronn, and Harold Petrie of 
New Orleans. 

Melvin Johnston, Al Moreau, and 
Jimmy Scott of Baton Rouge; Gro- 
ver Colvin and Jimmie Woods of 
Minden; Don Beasley, Joe Beasley, 
Fred Fulton, Ross Gwinn, Ed Hor- 
ton, and Bobby Parker of Natchi- 
toches. 



SPECIAL 
Monday - Tuesday 
Body Wave 
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Mon. 8a.m. — 12 Noon Sat. 
Daisy Rachal or Mrs. Scott 

DELTA 
Beauty Salon 



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Ph. 2951 



For The Best 
Food In Town 

Stop In 

At The 

WADDLE 'N 
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Phone 4949 
HIGHWAY 1 SOUTH 



Hubert Adams of Zachary; Cor- 
wyn Aldredge of St. Francisville; 
James Aymond, Pineville; George 
Cognevich, Venice; Phillip Creel, 
Franklinton; Arthur Floyd, El Do- 
rado, Ark.; Dave Gleason, Port 
Sulphur; Monte Ledbetter, Roa- 
noke. 

Gerald Malley, Cotton Valley; 
Lawrence Nugent, Bastrop; Claude 
Patrick, Holly Ridge; Allen Plum- 
mer, Mansfield; Benny Richard, 
Opelousas; Gary Schouest, Harvey; 
and Ted Wimberly, Houston. 

Managers and trainers were Ted 
Fowler, Don McCardle, Gerald 
Long, and Gordon Reynolds. 

Cross country lettermen are: 
Jerry Campbell, Robert Dufalo, 
Franz Focke, Dalton Phelps, Tim 
Poston, Tony Ward, Nick Wright, 
and Eddie Watt. 



Taus, B Frame Win 
Charity Bowl Game 

Sigma Tau Gamma combined 
their talents with B Frame to hand 
Kappa Alpha and the Coonies a 
12-0 loss in the annual Charity 
Bowl football game. This game was 
played at Demon Stadium and the 
entire benefits made from the game 
were donated to the United Fund. 

This was a regulation tackle 
game and both teams surprised the 
spectators by showing some fine 
moves and displaying aggressive 
tackling. 

Jeff Harris provided the scoring 
punch for the Sigma Taus B 
Frame as he scored both touch- 
downs for his team. The first T.D. 
came on a 37 yard pass from quar- 
terback Gerald Strother. The other 
score came from a one yard run by 
Harris. 

Gerald Strother was elected the 
games outstanding player. 



MAKE 

YOUR 

FAMILY 

AT HOME 
Away From Home. 




SHAMROCK MOTEL 



Highway 1 South 



Phone 5566 



TODD'S 



750 
FRONT ST. 



"A FRIENDLY Store" 

Your Favorite Brands 



FOR HER 



FOR 



'Vicky-Vaughn and Marty" Dresses 
'Paddle & Saddle" Sportswear 
'Happy Hiker" Shoes 
"Phil-Maid" Lingerie and Sleepwear 
'Best-Form" Bras and Foundations 

HIM 

'Lee Rider" Jeans 
'Sports-Fan" Ivy Pants 
'Wesboro" Shoes 
'E&W" Shirts 
"B.V.D." Underwear 

Charge Accounts Invited 



Jack Clayton is making an attempt 
to arrange for a substitute oppo- 
nent for the previously scheduled 
Sept. 18, 1965 date at State Fair 
Stadium. 

The NSC-SFA game had shown 
increasing attendance over the past 
several years as the gate receipts 
for 1964 almost doubled those of 
the previous year. 

Stephen F. Austin is a member 
of the Lone Star Conference and 
practically all of the Lone Star 
teams already contain Negro play- 
ers. 

There has been some talk that a 
possible meeting with Delta State 
of Cleveland, Miss, at State Fair 
Stadium will replace the regular 
game with Stephen F. Austin. 



Natchitoches 
Laundromat 

936 College Avenue 

CONVENIENT TO 
ALL STUDENT? 

Open 24 hours a day 
7 days a week 



PENNYLAND 

1300 Washington Across From Peoples Motor Co. 

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 
8 A.M. -12 P.M. 

Free Transportation To And From 
The College - 8 A.M. - 11 P.M. 

SIX POOL TABLES 

(Brunswick, Gold Crown) 

TWO SNOOKER TABLES 
(Brunswick, Gold Crown) 

Shuffle Board - Domino Tables 
Moon Tables - Bowling Tables 
Shooting Gallery 



SNACK BAR -AIR CONDITIONED 

ENTERTAINMENT FOR ALL 
MEN - LADIES - CHILDREN 

For Fun - Relaxation - Pleasure 
Visit PENNYLAND 

Ask details and particulars about contest on $25 
2-jointed snooker cue-tip. Starts Jan. 11 THIS WEEK 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 1965 



PASSING IN REVIEW 




By Ernie Harris 



This past Monday was pay-day 
for the advanced corps. I under- 
stand the checks came in Saturday 
afternoon after everyone had left 
for the Christmas holidays. In a 
way it may have been for the best, 
some of those Christmas bills may 
be coming due any day now. I 
know that some of mine are already 
due. 

The Men's Rifle Team started a 
more intensive training program 
this past week. The members of 
the team are now practicing from 
4 to 5:30 p. m. I am certain that 
this increased practice will pay 
off in their next match. 

My apologies to Cadet Sgt. Drap- 



per for not having his picture in 
the December 18th edition. 



Student Council 
Minutes 

January 4, 1965 

The regular meeting of the NSC 
Student Council was held at 6 p.m. 
in Bullard Hall. The meeting was 
caled to order by President Steve 
Blount. The minutes of the prev- 
ious meeting were read and ap- 
proved. 

Blount reported that there will 
not be a band at the basketball 
game January 5, due to band re- 
hersal. The College Band will play 
for the game January 6. 

Betty Moore raised the question 
as to whether juniors would be 
required to purchase a meal ticket. 
It was reported that a meeting will 
be held with Dean Nelken to dis- 
cuss this. 

Jim Leabo suggested that a mail 
box be placed in the area near the 
Campus Security building. It was 
suggested that this box have a 
later mail pickup in the afternoon 
than the post office. Jim Leabo 
was appointed to check into this. 

It was suggested that the Coun- 
cil give a coffee for the depart- 
ment heads prior to the perfor- 
mance of the Artist Series. Betty 
Moore moved that such a coffee 
be given after the Council checks 
with the Artist Series. Second by 
Scotty Maxwell. Motion passed. 

Joe Traigle announced that the 
budget committee would meet 
Wednesday, January 5. 

Dean Fulton reported that on 
December 18, the State Board of 
Education met and a new architect 
was selected for the proposed stud- 
ent center here at NSC. It was re- 
ported that the architect is now 
drawing up plans for the student 
center. 

Since it is now definite that the 
water tower will have to be moved. 
Carolyn Thomas suggested that 
the Council contact the mainten- 
ance department and ask them to 
begin construction of the neon 
"N" to go on top of the Fine Arts 
Auditorium. 

Stan Branton raised the quest- 
ion as to when the Chemistry 
Building would be ready for use 
again. It was reported that this 
would not be known until an arch- 
itect was named to investigate the 
damage. 

There being no further business. 
Thomas moved that the meeting 
be adjourned. Second by Marcan- 
tel. Meeting adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Carolyn Thomas 

Secretary 





William Draper 

Cadet Sgt. Jim Head of the Black 
Knights out-did his comrades on 
Christmas presents I think. Jim 
was married during the holidays. 
He and his wife are living off 
campus at the present time. Con- 
gratulations and best wishes Jim. 

There are some personnel at the 
Armory who deserve credit. I 
would like to thank Col. Gilder- 
sleeve, Maj. Hopkins, Maj. Burns, 
Sgt. Brown, Sgt. Fiveash, and es- 
pecially Sgt. Perry Lyman. Cadet 
Sgt. Perry Angle certainly deserves 
a word of praise for the fine job 
that he did keeping me informed 
of the activities at the Armory. 
There were other members who 
helped me a great deal, but due to 
my limited space, I can't name all 
of them. The help and co-operation 
that each of you gave me is deeply 
appreciated. Without it, this col- 
umn could never have been. 



Non-citizens Must 
Report Addresses 

All non-citizens in the United 
States must report their addresses 
to the government each January. 
Forms for this purpose are avail- 
able at any Post Office or Office 
of the U.S. Immigration & Natural- 
ization Service. They should be 
filled out in those offices and re- 
turned to the deck from whom 
received. The alien should not 
attempt to mail them himself. 
Keep in mind that the time for 
reporting is the month of January. 
Severe penalties are provided for 
those who fail to comply with this 
law. 



Catering to those who 
care about the health and 
• beauty of their hair 

CHARM 
BEAUTY SHOP 

One-half Block 
From The Campus 

Phone 3948 114 Lee St. 
Open Monday Noon Till 
Saturday Noon 



OPEN 
24 HOURS A DAY 

MURPHY'S RESTAURANT 

1215 WASHINGTON ST. PHONE 2609 



CHIEF DRIVE-IN 



Closed Monday 
Through Thursday 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 



Peter Sellers 

"A SHOT IN 
THE DARK" 

— PLUS— 

John Wayne 
THE 

"COMMANCHEROS' 
Both In Color 



Sunday Only 



Robert Walker 
Burl Ives 
In 

"ENSIGN PULVER" 
Color 

— Also — 

FOOTBALL HIGHLIGHTS 
OF 1964 ! 



CANE THEATRE 

Natchitoches, La. Phone 2922 
Friday - Saturday 




• Kmo 

« VmVU&UHHMUKHU PCTK 



plus 



'TARZAN'S FIGHT 
FOR LIFE" 
Gordon Scott 
In Color 



Sunday - Tuesday 



Mt)M _ ASwKrawrtaerai 

*lheMusic,TheBeat.. 
fJteetThe Go-go Giris 
in 



Yourself 

a COLLEGE 



InM™ 
COLOR 



It- 



Wednesday — Thursday 




RENE 



Cuiers 



jot House 



-Fran scope 




DOUBTING THOMAS? 
HOPEFUL AGNOSTIC? 



Christianity has more to offer than hope, it has posMw 
] proof in the form of a MIRACLE which was foretold, 
; described and is intensely personal. Ask the Religions 
Leaders or send me a card marked ESP- 17. My reply is 
free, non-Denominational, Christian. Martyn W. Hart, 
Box 53, Glen Ridge, N. J. 07028 (USA). 




STUDENTS 

Let us pamper your 
parents when they come 
to visit you. 

For Room Reservations 
dial 6401 

"Wake-up Coffee and Papers' 




LOOK YOUR BEST 
ON CAMPUS . . • 

Well conditioned shoes ore on im- 
portant part of your oppearance. 



SHOE REPAIRS 
OF 

ALL KINDS 

Special 
RANDY PEDIC 
Basketball Shoes 



Orthopedic Corrections 
Western Style Belts & Wallets 
Moccasins 
Polishes — Laces — Dyes 

GUNTER'S SHOE SERVICE 

BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 



DON 

Theatre 

BOX OFFICE OPENS 

Mon.-Fri 5:45 

Sat. & Sun 12:45 



NOW SHOWING 

with DANGER or a 
DAME . ..they go 
where the action is 
HOTTEST! 

1^ 




STEWART GRANGER 

COMMAHDO 




Saturday 
Double Feature 



Rock 


Howard Hawks 

production 


Hudson 

Paula 

Prentiss 


Marts 
Favorite 
Sporty^ 



( vv,'":n Wins . TECWHCO! or 



—Plus— 




STARRING " 

sal aiwEO-:-iii:<p. f o:oH-tuA>:Ar;iT^ 

»;ik EDWARD C. PIATT • FAY WRAY 

A UNIVERSAL RE RELEASE 



Sun-Mon-Tues 




PAUL MAN, 
UUIREKGE HARVEY, 
CLAIRE BLOOM, 
EDWARD B.BDBIMSOW * 

Coming Soon ! 

"SEX AND THE 
SINGLE GIRL" 




u r r e n t 



VOL. LI— No. 16 



S 



auce 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches La. Friday, Feb. 12, 1965 



Ann Cleveland Is Lady Of Bracelet 
Selected From Field Of 30 Finalists 

Pageant Sponsored 



By NSC Yearbook 
Staff Annually 

Ann Cleveland, a freshman from 
Shreveport, was chosen as the 
Northwestern beauty in the annual 
Lady of the Bracelet Contest spon- 
sored by the Potpourri on Janu- 
ary 8. 

She was among thirty semi- 
finalists judged on the basis of 
personality, poise, facial and fig- 
ure beauty. From the thirty, nine 
finalists were picked — Ann Cleve- 
land, Glenda Abney, Jeannie 
Behm, Georgia Blair, Shirley Kay 
Dalme, Thellie Levee, Cecelia 
Shea, Betty Thomas, and Jean 
Walker. 

Judging the contest were Mr. 
George M. Lewis, Mrs. Lou Flee- 
man, Mrs. Mary Jo Webb, Miss 
Lois Bartlett, and Mr. and Mrs. C. 
Drew Willingham. 

Editor of the Potpourri, John 
Weffenstette, presented Ann with 
the bracelet and roses that mark- 
ed her the judges' choice. 

Runners-up were Cecelia Shea, 
Georgia Blair, and Jeannie Behm. 




Talent Auditions 
Set For Tonight 

An auditioning team from LSU 
will be on campus Friday evening 
to judge auditions for the Inter- 
collegite Talent Show to be held 
at LSU in March. 

Any type act which does not 
consist of more than five persons 
and which does not last over five 
minutes is eligible to audition. 

The auditions will be held at 
7 p.m. in the Music department. 
Those interested may call Wayne 
Meachum, extension 207. 




Ann Cleveland 



Valentine Dance 
To Be Tonight 

The A.W.S. Valentine Dance will 
be held in the Student Center to- 
night. The Valentine Court, con- 
sisting of five couples will be pre- 
sented at the dance. Couples were 
nominated by the women's dorm- 
itories earlier and the vote will 
be tallied by Mrs. Lucille Hen- 
dricks, dean of women and Dud- 
ley Fulton, dean of student rela- 
tions. "The Uniques" will be on 
hand to furnish the music. 

Visiting Lecturer 
Slated To Address 
Science Groups 

Dr. W. L. Hall, associate pro- 
fessor of statistics at the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, will be on 
the Northwestern campus on Feb- 
ruary 7 and 18. 

He will give a lecture on "The 
Role of the Poison Probality Law" 
at 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb- 
ruary 17 in Room 20 of Caldwell 
Hall. He will aso be the speaker 
at the Bioogical Sciences Seminar 
at 1:00 on Thursday, February 18 
in Room 108 of Williamson Hall. 
The topic of this lecture will be 
"Pitfalls in Comparing Rayes— 
Some Edidemiological Case Stud- 
ies." 

Neither lecture is of a highly 
technical nature, and all interested 
persona are invited to attend. 

Dr. Hall's visit is at the invita- 
tion of the Mathematics Depart- 
ment under the Visiting Lecturers 
in Statistical Programs conducted 
by the American Statistical Asso- 
ciation, the Biometric Society, and 
the Institute of Mathematical Sta- 
tistics. This program is supported 
with the aid of funds appropriated 
by the National Science Founda- 
tion. 



College Theater To Present 

"The Torch Bearers 



The College Theater will pre- 
sent a three-act play, "The Torch- 
Bearers," at Northwestern Tues- 
day, Wednesday, and Thursday 
evenings. 

An innovation is that the audi- 
ence will be seated in the Little 
Theater for the first act, will move 
to the large auditorium for the 
second, and return to the Little 
Theater for the third and final 
act. 

But the play in its own right is 
unique. Its premiere was staged 
by author George Kelly himself 
at the Savoy Theater in Asbury, 
New Jersey, August 22, 1922. Kelly 
wasn't considered a playwright but 
a writer of "Sketches" which he 
directed and in which he acted. 

"The Torch-Bearers" is a satire 
on the little theater movement 
prevalent during the '20s. It was 
socially right to belong and partic- 
ipate in the movement. 

The play has no plot and is a 
"play within a play." It portrays 



the problems of staging a play, 
a benefit for the "Seaman's Insti- 
tute," with "local talent." Prom- 
inent in the play is Mrs. Pampi- 
nelli, the director and leader of 
the movement. Impossible situa- 
tions make for hilarity. 

Members of the cast are: Pat 
Delano, Jenny; Jim Hawthorne. 
Mr. Ritter; Jayne Makar, Mrs. 
Paula Ritter; Frances Councill, 
Mrs. Betty Pampinelli; Loren Wil- 
son, Mrs. Spindler; Anne Weaver, 
Mrs. Nelly Fell; Billy Toland, Mr. 
Huxey Houssefrosse; Doyle Wil- 
liams, Teddy Spearing; Dolores 
Russel, Miss Florence McCrick- 
ett; Gordon Parker, Mr. Ralph 
Twiller; Gary Piper, Stage Mana- 
ger, and Michael Caldwell and 
Charlotte Ellis, double cast as Mrs. 
Cara Sheppard. 

Dr. Edna West, director of the 
College Theater, is directing the 
play. Frank Magers is technical 
director. 



Placement interviews Scheduled 



Representatives from three com- 
panies will be in the placement 
office in Caldwell Hall Feb. 15, 16, 
and 18 to interview those inte- 
rested in employment with their 
companies. 

The three companies which will 
send representatives to the place- 
ment office are The Firestone Tire 
and Rubber Company of Akron, 
Ohio; Bakersfield City School 
District of Bakersfield, California; 
and Southern Bell Telephone. 

D. K. Lewis, the Firestone 
representative, will hold inter- 
views from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
Feb. 16 for men with a B.S. in 
Business Administration or a B.A. 
in Liberal Arts for sales manage- 
ment, retread shop management, 
and credit. Preferred are inter- 
views with majors in marketing, 
general business, or liberal arts 
for sales management; a major in 
finance or general business for 
credit. They are interested only in 
men who rank in the upper half 
of their class scholastically. 
Approximately 80% of Firestone's 
opportunities are in sales manage- 
ment and the remaining 20% are 
divided into retread shop manage- 
ment and credit. 

Dorothy May Gibson andMar- 
guerite Holcombe will hold inter- 



views from 11 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. 
Feb. 15 for those interested in 
teaching positions in the Bakers- 
field city school district and will 
be authorized to offer positions to 
those qualified and recommended. 
They are prepared to interview 
candidates for elementary posi- 
tions, kindergarten through eighth 
grade, and are paticulaly interest- 
ed in interviewing those for kin- 
dergerten through sixth grade. 

Arepresentative of Southern 
Bell Telephone will be on campus 
in the Placement office on Thurs- 
day, Feb. 18, to interviewsopho- 
more, junior, and senior girls who 
do not live on campus for part- 
time telephone operators for the 
Natchitoches office. 

Applicants must be willing to 
work four hours a day four days a 
week from 5:30 to 9:30 or 6:00 to 
10 p.m. The salary will average 
approximately $100 a month. Full 
time summer work will also be 
available for the girls accepting 
part-time work now. The average 
monthly salary for the summer 
will be approximately $230 per 
month. Any girls interested in the 
above work may make applications 
prior to the above date in the 
placement office and return for 
an interview. 




(Above) — Lines, lines and more lines. It is no wonder that everyone seems to get lost 
occasionally. In fact, if you just know where you have been, then you are usually better 
off than the person beside you. 



Registration 
NSC 

Style 



(Above right) — Just as you think that the worse is over, 
you must pass that rigid inspection at the checking desks. 



(Below right) — When you have filled out forms and more 
forms until there seems to be no end, you can stop and 
pray for a minute and hope that it will all go away. 



■ 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1965 



Kappa Alpha President Visits 
Campus For Initiai Convivium 



Members of Gamma Psi Chapter 
took part in an historic weekend 
for their fraternity. It was the first 
visit to this chapter from the 
Knight Commander, Dr. John W. 
Nowell.for initial celebration of 
Convivium, the birthdate of Gen- 
eral Robert Edward Lee, spiritual 
founder of the Order. 

Dr. Nowell and Joe Traigle, KA. 
president, visited with college offi- 
cials and toured Northwestern's 
campus soon after Nowell's arrival. 
Following this was a luncheon at 
the Town House with the Natch- 
itoches Alumni of KA. 

A reception in Dr. Nowell's 
honor was held at the KA House 
on campus to give everyone an 
opportunity to meet the Knight 
Commander. The reception was 
followed with a tour of Melrose 
Plantation, which is owned by Mr. 
J. H. Henry, KA Alumni. The re- 
mainder of the afternoon was 
spent seeing the sights of Natch- 
itoches. 

The Chapter, its alumni, and 
guests met at the El Camino that 
night for the traditional conviv- 
ium banquet which was opened 
with an invocation by Reverend 
Percy Hagan of the Broadmoor 
Presbyterian Church. President 
Joe Traigle then gave the welcome 
which was followed by a brief ad- 
dress by Mayor Ray Scott who 
awarded Dr. Nowell with an honor- 
ary citizenship of Natchitoches. 
The traditional toast for General 



Lee was given by Leroy Scott, KA 
White Province Commander. 

The principle speaker was Dr. 
Nowell who spoke on the qualities 
and attributes General Lee ex- 
acted of students while he was 
president of Washington and Lee. 
The chapter presented the Knight 



Commander with a handmade rep- 
lica of his jewell of office. Danny 
Davis, vice-president for the pledge 
class, presented Pledge Trainer 
George Mullins with a trophy for 
a jop well done followed by a 
class president, Kent McMichael 
to No. 1 Joe Traigle. 




Delta Zeta Honors 
Senior Members 

Epsilon Beta Chapter of Delta 
Zeta entertained the graduating 
seniors with a Senior-sendoff Par- 
ty. Honored seniors were Patsy 
Gaspard and Sam Lucero, DZ Man 
of the Year. Also honored was 
Suzanne Maynard who will leave 
in February to study in Vienna, 
Austria. 

Delta Zetas are proud of their 
members who were recently chos- 
en to have their names published 
in the "Who's Who Among Stu- 
dents in American Universities and 
Colleges." Being chosen for this 
honor were Patsy Gaspard, Chris 
Newsome, Jean Walker, and Sam 
Lucero, DZ Man of the Year. 

Hats off to Ann Cleveland who 
was chosen Lady of the Bracelet 
Delta Zetas are very proud of Ann 
who is also president of the pledge 
class. Other sisters appearing in 
the pageant were Nina Burlile, 
Suzanne Maynard, Carolyn Thom- 
as, Cecelia Shea, and Jean Walker. 

Delta Zeta actives and pledges 
alike are looking forward to init- 
iation which will be held this 
spring. 



Mayor Ray Scott presents Kappa Alpha President, Dr. 
John W. Newell, with a fountain pen set and an honorary 
citizenship certificate from the city of Natchitoches. 




Pictured with some of the College dignitaries is Dr. John W. Nowell, Kappa Alpha na- 
tional president. Left to right are: Mrs. Lucille Hendrick, dean of women, Dr. Nowell, 
Mr. Dudley Fulton, director of student relations, Mr. L. 0. Nichols, dean of men, and 
Joseph Traigle, local KA president. 



Dean Townsend 
Participates In 
Utilities Seminar 

Dr. David Townsend, professor 
of business and Dean of School of 
Applied Arts and Sciences at 
Northwestern, participated in 
Southern Bell Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company's Fourth Louisiana 
Seminar on Public Utilities Eco- 
nomics, in New Orleans, Jan. 24-27. 

Study of the seminar which fea- 
tured several other professors from 
colleges and universities through- 
out the state, was centered on regu- 
lation, its changing characteristics 
and its net effect on our free enter- 
prise system. 



Life in a Laundry Room 

(ACP)— The 23 girls who have 



Nu Sigma Chi Will 
Be Initiated Into 
National Chapter 

Nu Sigma Chi, the Northwestern 
chapter of Alpha Lambda Delta, 
national women's honor sorority, 
is currently arranging the sche- 
dule for its national initiation 
which will occur in March. 

Activities during the fall semes- 
ter included skits in the freshmen 
womens dormitories to acquaint 
them with the organization, a 
Christmas reception honoring the 
women who had attained a 3.0 
average, and caroling at the homes 
of retired faculty members. 

Dr. Tom Wells of the social 
sciences department delivered a 
talk entitled "How to Write a 
Novel" at the last meeting. At a 
previous program Catherine Win- 
ters, a retired faculty member, 
spoke on "The Importance of a 
College Education for Women." 

This spring, in addition to the 
initiation, the sorority plans to 
install new members and attend a 
play in Shreveport. A Banquet is 
also being tenatively planned. 

Officers are Pam Pepperman, 
president; Lelone James, vice- 
president; Katherine Miller, sec- 
retary; Jessie Sneed, treasurer; 
Sharon Hillman, historian; Karen 
Bennett, social chairman; Mary 
Beth Henderson, keeper of the 
grades; Carolyn Everett and Betty 
Sue Dewitt, junior advisers. 

Special recognition is being 
given Lola Braley, Martha Kay 
Emmons, Shirley Shaffer, Marie 
Medica, and Nikki Towry who are 
now in the clinical part of their 
schooling. 

Mrs. John Kyser, Dean Lucille 
Hendricks, and Assistant Dean 
Addie Huckaby are honorary mem- 
bers of the organization sponsored 
by Mary McEniry of the English 
department. 



UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN, 
University of Kansas, Lawrence. 
But one of them, Bonnie Ward, 



their living quarters in laundry a senior, has this complaint: "The 
rooms because of temporary over- girls keep coming into my room to 
crowding are adjusting, reports wash their feet in my big sink." 



NEW SERVICE AVAILABLE 

Quick service drycleaning and shirt laundering is 
now offered at Community Cleaners & Shirt Laundry 
located at 103 Second Street. 

Drycleaning in by 10 A. M. may be picked up by 
5 P. M. the same day Monday • Saturday with pressing 
while you wait. 

Shirts in one day to include Friday may be picked 
up by 5 P. M. the following day. 

COMMUNITY CLEANERS AND 
SHIRT LAUNDRY 



Phone 2229 



103 Second St. 




For Good 
Hair Coloring 
Shaping 
Styling 

visit 



TRESSIES 
Beauty Salon 

in 

East Natchitoches 
Call 4536 

Closed Mondays 
See 

Tressie - Elsie - Irma 
Jean - Linda 

201 EAST Third Street 
Across from Warrens Mkt. 




LOOK YOUR BEST 
ON CAMPUS . . . 

Well conditioned shoe* ore on im- 
portant port of your appearance. 



SHOE REPAIRS 
OF 

ALL KINDS 

Special 
RANDY PEDIC 

Basketball Shoes 



Orthopedic Corrections 
Western Style Belts & Wallets 
Moccasins 
Polishes — Laces — Dyes 

GUNTER'S SHOE SERVICE 

BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 



TODD'S 



750 
FRONT ST. 



'A FRIENDLY Store' 



Your Favorite Brands 

FOR HER 

• "Vicky-Vaughn and Marty" Dresses 

• "Paddle & Saddle" Sportswear 

• "Happy Hiker" Shoes 

• "Phil-Maid" Lingerie and Sleepwear 

• "Best-Form" Bras and Foundations 

FOR HIM 

• "Lee Rider" Jeans 
'Sports-Fan" Ivy Pants 
'Wesboro" Shoes 
'E&W" Shirts 
'B.V.D." Underwear 

Charge Accounts Invited 



I 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1965 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



I 

L 



Editorials 



Students Congratulated On Conduct 
During Recent Integration Crisis 

It is truly a rare occasion when an entire student body, 
without exception, can be congratulated on its conduct. Prob- 
ably never before this week has a group of ths size accepted a 
change of the magnitude of the integration of Northwestern 
State College without a single incident. 

This would be an accomplishment anywhere, much less, at 
a college that is as instilled with the ideas of separation as 
strongly as are present at Northwestern. This fact makes the 
accomplishment even more noteworthy. 

One could never be further from the truth to think that 
this was purely accidental and that there was no preparation 
for the change. The administration, as well as the students, 
was most instrumental in insuring that nothing rash would 
happen. But, primarily the students were responsible for the 
success. 

This action, or inaction, further goes to prove that the 
students of Northwestern are as mature and responsible as 
any group of college students assembled anywhere. Realizing 
that the "Law of the Land" in this country is never changed 
by demonstrations or by force, but by the will of the people 
was a primary factor in the acceptance of the change. 

This period of crisis is certainly not over, and although 
the vast majority of the student body was completely opposed 
to the integrating of the College, you must continue to remem- 
ber that you are responsible for maintaining your own reputa- 
tion and the reputation of the College and do your part to 
assure the continued superb conduct. 

Again, CONGRATULATIONS NSC STUDENTS, you have 
performed admirably and as long as you continue to do so, 
you will never have to be ashamed of yourself or your 
College. 



Parking Problems Created 

There are many things around Northwestern that could 
be criticized, some justifiably, but the most absurd of absurd- 
ities may be found leaning against the side of the campus 
security building. It is a sign that reads, "Reserved For Reg- 
istration Of Vehicles Only." 

This area along the side of the campus security building 
just happens to be in the area of North, West and South halls 
and already the parking problem is acute. Granted, there 
should be an area such as this during the day, but the Security 
office close as 4:30 each dayand there is no reason for having 
this parking place empty all night. 

If they are really trying to solve the parking problem, 
then it would be wise to start at their own doorsteps. 



LI TTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 




T7M£ OFTH Y^AI? ON TH|3 CAH\M4." 



PASSING IN REVIEW 




By PERRY ANGLE 



In any organization there are a 
number of people who have a great 
deal of work to do and rarely get 
the recognition they deserve. One 
such person in the armory is Staff 
Sergeant Fiveash, a 13 year vete- 
ran of the army. Sgt. Fiveash is 
the supply sergeant for all ROTC 
trainees and, as such, must cater 
to students with both real and ima- 
gined equipment problems. Having 
already outfitted a little over 200 
men with 3 uniforms, socks, weap- 
pon, etc. each, he stands ready to 
fix-up another 200 with just the 
goods in stock. 

You might well imagine, with 13 
years in the army that the Sgt. and 
his family have seen a good bit of 
the world. Sgt. Fiveash has been 
from Korea to Germany, with sev- 
eral stateside stops in between. 

All the cadets know Sgt. Five- 
ash, a man who, under often try- 



LETTERS 
To The 
EDITOR 



Dear Staff, Members of the 
Entertainment Committee, and 
Student Council: 

There are many people on this 
campus (only a few are listed be- 
low) who feel that something 
should be done about the way our 
entertainment money is being 
spent. 

Since the committee was formed 
they have brought to our campus 
two "folk" singing groups (one 
was actually hillbilly-which is no 
disgrace-but the group was hired 
as a folk group) and one rock and 
roll group. Two of the shows were 
"spiced" with distasteful and down 
right filthy jokes. Only one group 
fulfilled the mandatory require- 
ment of having a "big name." 

We concede that there are those 
on our campus who have been com- 
pletely satisfied with the enter- 
tainment thus far. But what about 
those of us who appreciate a high- 
er quality of popular entertain- 
ment? We are required to pay $1.00 
per semester for entertainment 
and so far have received nothing 
for our mandatory investment. 
Many of us have discussed this 
with out Student Council repre- 
sentatives and members of the En- 
tertainment Committee but it ap- 
pears that the only students repre- 
sented on the council are those 
with whom the council members 
personally agree. So far we have 
found only one committee member 
and one council member who will 
voice our desires. 

We are not trying to infringe 
upon the rights of those who enjoy 
rock and roll, low class folk music, 
and dirty jokes, but we do feel that 
we have as many rights as they do. 
Those in office should bend an ear 
to everyone and try to please as 
many as possible. 

Why can't we have a variety of 
entertainment so everyone, includ- 
ing those of us who appreciate big- 
ger and better popular entertain- 
ment, will reap dividends from our 
$1.00 per semester. 
Signed : 

Terrell D. Banks, Cheryl Bess 
Barrett, Lynn E. Huey, Jamie Ellen 
Clark, Douglass A. Sullivan, Bill 
Philips, Robert Bollar. 

Don O'Bier, Randy Nix, Bonnie 
McCandlish, Dickie Scarborough, 
Carol Adkins, Robert E. Graham, 
Conette Lindsey. 

Sue Gaskin, Cathy Cook, Herbie 
Smith, W. T. Collier, Wanda Rad- 
ford, Sandra Guidry, Joyce De- 
Fatta, Carol Rigdon, Carola Honey- 
cutt. 

Thellie Levee, Anita Nadrichal, 
Linda Barnes, Martha McEIwee, 
Linda Lawless, Gary Stahlbuth, 



ing conditions, will invariably give 
"service with a smile." 

You may notice a new name on 
the top of this column. We were 
indeed sorry for Ernie Harris to 
have to stop writing it. It was his 
creation and all in the armory will 
miss Ernie, who was constantly 
poking his head into the lounge, 




Robert Turk 



questioning cadets, and "nosing 
out news" in general. We only hope 
we can do half as well. 

Cadet Robert Turk, a sophomore 
member of the Black Knights and 
a squad leader, won Best Cadet 
nearly a month ago, but didn't get 
a mention for his outstanding 
efforts. 



Betty Scott, Linda Kniepp. 

Mary Norris, Ginger Risley, Mar- 
garet Bookter, Linda Smith, Enid 
Sawyer, Jim Bosler, Eugene Fitz- 
gerald, Patty Shelton. 

Gayle Stecha, Mary Hutton, 
Prissy Dorgan, Mardel Williams, 
Sandra Ackerman, Gloria Berlia, 
Bill Brasher, Lynna Huble. 

John Otwell, Rosemary Marshall, 
James Gentry, Z. D. Meachum, Cora 
Jacobs, Joy Mannzen, Wanda Val- 
entine, Barbara Russell. 



Editor, Current Sauce 
Northwestern State College 
Natchitoches, La. 
Dear Sir: 

Being one the older students, 
as we are called here at NSC, I 
generally try not to voice my opin- 
ion on matters unless called upon 
since they so often seem to be dif- 
ferent or "Old-fashioned" to my 
younger fellow students. However, 
there is one thing which is never 
dated and that is respect for one's 
country. 

For quite some time now, I have 
passed the square in front of Cald- 
well and felt rather badly about 
what I've seen each day. Atop the 
flagpole blowing in the wind is a 
very much torn and tattered Amer- 
ican flag. Judging by its present 
condition it should have been re- 
placed long ago. 

While here I've seen money 
spent for a sun dial, fish pond, 
shrubs and even a large sum of 
money spent recently for a few 
short hours of questionable "top" 
entertainment by the student coun- 
cil. Yet, our ever observant and 
diligent council seems not to be 
able to consider seeing that action 
is taken to replace an American 
flag which has served its purpose 
well and should be retired from 
service. 

I hope this gentle prod jars 
our student council into action if 
they don't have more pressing bus- 
iness, and if they see fit to see that 
a few dolars are spent wisely for 
a change. 

Yours truly, 

John T. Hearn 



Student Council 
Minutes 

January 11, 1965 
The regular meeting of the Nor- 
th western Student Council was 
called to order at 6 p.m. by Presi- 
dent Steve Blount. The minutes of 
the previous meeting were read 
and approved after the roll was 
called. 

Calbert Marcantel raised the 
question as to when the peg board, 
which will list campus phone num- 
bers, would be ready to put up in 
the student center. It was reported 
that it should be up soon. 

Milton Rhea reported that the 
maintenance department has ord- 
ered a light for Schieb Hall. 

Barbara Wallace asked when 
Religious Emphasis Week will be- 
gin. It was reported that the week 
will begin March 1. 

J. O. Charrier reported that the 
Student Union of LSU is sponsor- 
ing a state wide talent contest. 
Anyone who is now attending col- 
lege in Louisiana is eligible to try 
out to be on the show which will 
be held at LSU on March 26. 
Charrier stated that LSU will send 
representatives to NSC to listen 
to any students who would like to 
audition for the show. Patsy Gas- 
pard moved that the Council pub- 
licize the tryouts and that a date 
be set for an audition. Second by 
R. J. Ardoin. Motion passed. LSU 
will be contacted and a date for 
the audition arranged. Betty Mo- 
ore and Wayne Meachum are in 
charge of this. 

Mike Miller moved that the 
council recommend to the admin- 
istration that the neon "N" which 
is to be constructed to go on the 
Fine Arts Auditorium be changed 
from an "N"to "NSC". Second by 
Calbert Marcantel. Motion passed. 

Jim Leabo reported that a mail 
box is to be placed in the triangle 
between Caspari, Natchitoches 
Hall, and the Fine Arts Auditor- 
ium. The last pickup will be be- 
tween 5:30 and 6:00 p.m. every 
evening. It has been suggested that 
the mail box in front of Varnado 
be moved to the south side of 
Louisiana Hall, so that it will 
serve more students. 

Joe Traigle reported that the 
food committee had met with mem- 
bers of the administration. Traigle 
reported that at the present time 
juniors would be required to pur- 
chase a meal ticket. This will be 
in effect until a study has been 
made of the fall statistics to find 
out how many seniors did purchase 
a meal ticket and how many did 
not. After this study is conducted, 
the food committee will meet a- 
gain with members of the admin- 
istration. 

Patsy Gaspard suggested that 
plugs be placed in each room of 
the proposed new dorms for tele- 
phones. If the student occupying 
the room wanted a phone, the tele- 
phone company could install one, 
and the student would pay a 
monthly charge. A discussion fol- 
lowed. 

There being no further business, 
Stan Branton moved that the meet- 
ing be adjourned. Second by Bar- 
bara Wallace. Meeting adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Secretary 

Carolyn Thomas 



c r^urrent Sauce 

ESTABLISHED 1914 

Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State CoUege of Louisiana. Sub- 
scription $3 the year payable in advance. 

Member of the Associated Collegiate Press 

Duffy Wall Editor-in-Chief 

Sharon Hillman Associate Editor 

Kenny Baker News Editor 

.Jerry Brill Sports Editor 

Joy Brewton Society Editor 

.John Lewis Business Manager 

Linda Broughton .... Advertising Manager 

Jon Gibson Staff Artist 

Roy G. Clark Faculty Adviser 

Editorial Staff: Mary Ellen Davis, Walley 
Hebert, Carolyn Brown, Perry Angle, 
Ann Massey, and Patsy Watkins. 

Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not reflect 
the opinions of the student body or the 
administration and faculty of the college. 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1965 



McPherson Article 
Published Recently 

An article entitled "Conduct Em- 
ployee Attitude Surveys Your- 
self," by C. R. McPherson, assist- 
tant professor of business admin- 
istration at Northwestern, appear- 
ed in the January issue of "Busi- 
ness Management." 

The article gives detailed in- 
formation on how to conduct an 
employee attitude survey, what 
type of questions should be asked, 
suggestions on distribution of the 
questionnaire, and why manage- 
ment should bother with such sur- 
veys. Also included in the article 
is a questionnaire that has been de- 
vised by the author and is being 
used by several industrial compan- 
ies. 

McPherson, a member of the 
NSC faculty for six years, received 
both the B.S. and M.B.A. from 
East Texas State College. 



Norwegian Teacher 
Visits Library 

Per E. Seysersted, a native of 
Norway and a teacher of American 
literature at the University of Oslo, 
spent two days recently in the 
Louisiana Room of Russell Library 
in order to make use of its exten- 
sive Kate Chopin material. 

Seyersted was formerly a Nor- 
wegian businessman. His interest 
in intellectual and cultural matters 
brought him to the United States 
where he studied first at Boston 
University. After he received his 
B.A. degree there, he studied 
American literature at Harvard. 
His interest in Kate Chopin grew 
out of a paper he prepared on her 
literary works. After he received 
his SI.A. degree from Harvard, he 
returned to Norway to teach Amer- 
ican literature. 

Among the manuscript material 
consulted here by Seyersted were 
documents concerning the Chopin 
family. These were given to the 
Library by the late Dr. Eugene 
Watson and his brother, Mr. Ar- 
thur Watson, of Natchitoches. 
Other documents given by Miss 
Carmen Breazeale were also very 
helpful to Seyersted. 

Mr. Seyersted had high praise 
for the completeness of the Kate 
Chopin collection in Russell Lib- 
rary. In addition to manuscript 
material concerning her, many 
critical studies in microform and 
letterpress are on file in the Louis- 
iana Room. Mr. Seyersted was very 
pleased to be able to consult here 
the very rare copy of Daniel B. Cor- 
ley's "A Visit to Uncle Tom's 
Cabin" since Kate Chopin's first 
novel "At Fault" deals with some 
of the same material included in 
Corley'i book. 

The Louisiana Room has copies 
of all of Kate Chopin's books. A 
copy of her first novel, "At Fault" 
was only recently acquired from 
Yale University on microfilm. 

Mr. Seyersted's study of Kate 
Chopin is to be published by the 
Twayne Publishing Company, Inc., 
of New York, and should add a 
great deal to the growing interest 
in this early American realist, who 
is of peculiar interest in this area 
because of her residence in Clou- 
tierville and her use of local ma- 
terial in her works. 



Federal aid is exactly like a 
blood transfusion; you draw blood 
from jour right arm and inject 
it into your left arm, and spill 
most of it on the way across. 



SPECIAL 

Monday - Tuesday 
Body Wave 
Style Most Becoming 
To You 
Open 

Mon. 8a.m. — 12 Noon Sat. 
Daisy Rachal or Mrs. Scott 

DELTA 
Beauty Salon 

108 Amulet Ph. 2951 



Speech Tournament 
Being Held Today 
On Campus 

Donald L. Graham, assistant pro- 
fessor of speech and director of 
forensics at Northwestern, announ- 
ced that thirty-four Louisiana high 
schools sent 540 students to the 
29th annual Demon Forensic 
speech tournament which began 
Thursday morning. 

One hundred and four students 
are competing in debate. Other 
entries are in the individual speech 
events consisting of poetry reading, 
oratory, story telling, extempora- 
neous speaking, television, radio, 
after dinner speaking, humorous 
interpretation, and dramatic inter 
pretation. 

Top awards will be sweepstakes 
trophies which will go to schools 
amassing the greatest number of 
points in the Senior division and 
the Junior division. Plaques will 
be awarded to schools with the 
greatest total of points in the four 
divisions of the tournament. 

Schools entering students are: 
Cor Jesu, St. James Major, St. Al- 
oysius. Academy of the Holy An- 
gels, and Holy Cross, all of New- 
Orleans; and Natchitoches and St. 
Mary's of Natchitoches. 

Bolton and Menard of Alexand- 
ria; Fair Park, Jesuit, St. Vin- 
cent's Academy, Byrd, and Wood- 
lawn of Shreveport; Mt. Carmel 
Academy and Catholic of New 
Iberia; Opelousas and Academy of 
the Immaculate Conception of 
Opelousas. 

Cathedral and Mt. Carmel Aca- 
demy of Lafayette; Abbeville and 
Mt. Carmel Academy of Abbeville; 
Judice of Duson, Huston, St. Jo- 
seph of Rayne, East Jefferson of 
Metarie, St. Francisville, St. Fred- 
erick's of Monroe, Winnfleld, Boga- 
lusa, Archbishop Bljnk of Gretna, 
Istrouma of Baton Rouge, Con- 
verse, and Leesvi'l';. 

Cora Jesu was winner of the 
senior division in the 1964 tour- 
nament and Byrd was second. Aca- 
demy of the Holy Angels was se 
cond in the Junior division. 



Football Squad 
Starts Spring 
Practic Session 

Spring training for the NSC 
Demons got under way last Friday 
with 39 squadsmen, including 30 
lettermen, returning to action. 
Spring drills are held on Mondays. 
Wednesdays, and Fridays at 3:30 
and on Saturday at two o clock. 
The practice sessions will be cli- 
maxed by the annual spring game 
to be held on March 10. 

Coach Jack Clayton hopes to 
have a rebuilding program to help 
the Demon grid fortunes and to 
find replacements for losses from 
the 1964 squad. 

A look at the roster shows that 
there are seven ends, eight tackles, 
six guards, two centers, three 
quarterbacks, eight halfbacks, and 
five fullbacks. 

Primary task of the Demons this 
year will be to improve defense 
and to develop replacements at 
each position. Last year's club lost 
five and won four. 



A Vote for the Late Guy 

(ACP) — Mike Palmer, columnist 
for UH CALLBOARD, University 
of Hartford, Hartford, Conn., wants 
it known that not always being on 
time is a virtue, not a vice. 

Here's his experienced rea- 
soning: 

If a person is always punctual, 
or early, he obviously must have 
some time on his hands in order to 
make sure that he is on time. 

If a person has extra time, and 
uses it only to get somewhere 
punctually, he must be wasting 
some time, whereas the person 
who is habitually late must have 
things to do or he wouldn't be 
late in the first place. 

If the person has things to do 
that take up all his time, he 
obviously can't be accused of 
wasting time. 




STUDENTS 

Let us pamper your 
parents when they come 
to visit you. 

For Room Reservations 
dial 6401 

'Wake-up Coffee and Papers' 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 




*loo* at n me w, ^htrm. —M&wz in' &mv qon't 



CLASSICAL 



JAZZ 



POPULAR 



BACK TO SCHOOL 

RECORD SALE 
Baker's Town and Campus Bookstore 

Feb. 12 thru Feb. 26 

Your Favorite Artists On These Labels 
CAPITOL — MERCURY — MGM — DOT — RCA 
UNITED ARTISTS — VERVE 

• Ferrante & Teicher * Kingston Trio * George Shearing 

* Billy Vaughn * Josh White * Leslie Gore 

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• Charlie Byrd * Four Preps * Clebanoff 

SAVE $2 or $3 on Every Album 

Former List $3.98 and $4.98 Reduced To $1.98 
Former List $4.98 and $5.98 Reduced To $2.98 

"NSC's Favorite Bookstore" 




Cupid's Choice 




Valentine Cards 

Hallmark 



Valentine Candies 

Pangburn 
Hollingsworth 



Stationery by 



• EATON 

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Two Stores To Serve You 



DeBLIEUX' PHARMACY 

BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 
PHONE 4582 



NEW DRUG STORE 

SECOND AND ST. DENIS 
PHONE 2386 



FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 12, 1965 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 




Page I 



Demons Encounter 

Losing Streak 

Northwestern's Demons have 
constantly been on the downfall | 
since their Jan. 16 win over Ogle- 
thorpe University and have drop- 
ped their last six decisions. 

Since our last publication the 
Demons have come out on the 
short end of eight of their last 
nine games. Many of the contests 
were very close decisions but when 
the final whistle blew, NSC unfor- 
tunately possessed the lower score. 

The most recent losses that the 
Demons have suffered have been 
twice to Centenary College and 
once to McNeese, Northeast, Louis- 
iana Tech, Southwestern. Southern 

NSC's David Clark has been the 
leading point producer for the De- 
mons as he has been consistently 
scoring around 20 points per game 
and currently sports a 17.1 point 
scoring average. David has stood 
out in conference competition as 
is evidenced by his 23.4 point con- 
ference average. His 29 point ef- 
fort against Louisiana Tech was 
his highest of the season for a 
single game. 

Northwestern lost out to both of I 
its pine cone competitors this sea- 
son as the Demons were outpoint- 
ed by Louisiana Tech on Jan. 28 
by a score of 83-68 and Centenary 
on Jan. 23 in a close 89-84 deci- 
sion. Tuesday night they were again 
snowed under by the Centenary 
Gents 112-80. 



FROM TH£ 





BY UERW BRILL 



A matter was brought up to our 
attention the other day of which 
something should be said. It con- 
cerns the scheduling of the NSC 
basketball games. A quick look at 
the schedule shows that there were 
eight games scheduled at home 
that would take place on a Saturday 
or while school was not in session. 
This included four on Saturday 
and four during vacations or 
breaks. 

The Demons opened their season 
against Southeastern Oklahoma on 
Nov. 27-28. The opening game of 
the season is a game people like to 
go to so they may see what to ex- 
pect for the remainder of the year. 
From what we hear, the crowd 
that night was small since the NSC 
student body was home on Thanks- 
giving vacation. The other two 
games held during a break was 
against two top GSC rivals, La. 
Tech and USL. 

Concerning Saturday games, this 
might prove to be a very fine idea 
for schools where there are a great 
number of students who are staying 
for the weekends, but this is not 
the case for NSC. Whether we like 
to admit it or not, we have been 
tagged as a "suitcase college." If 
you were to look around on a Sat- 
urday afternoon, you might have 
thought a mass evacuation had 
taken place. Since a schools team 
is for its students, then why sche- 
dule a game when its students will 
not be able to attend. Due to this 
fact, the games against La. Col- 
lege, Oglethorpe, Centenary, and 
probably McNeese tomorrow night, 
have shown a considerable lack of 



attendance. We would also like to 
add that the game with Centenary, 
a long time foe of the Demons, was 
held during final week. 

We think a good idea would be 



to have two nights a week devoted 
to conference games for each team 
in the GSC. It has proven to be a 
good idea in other conferences. Not 
only would it be for better crowds, 
it would also increase interest. Con- 
ference games could be played each 
Monday and Thursday night. These 
games could be scheduled first and 
then build the rest of your schedule 
around that. The final schedule 
was checked by the athletic coun- 
cil, but as we understand it all 
they check for is to be sure that a 
team has not scheduled any games 
over the limit. 

To have an effective schedule, 
you should not wait to the last 
minute. Work should be done ahead 
of time so that you will have some 
decent choices. 




OPEN 
24 HOURS A DAY 

MURPHY'S RESTAURANT 

1215 WASHINGTON ST. 



PHONE 2609 



Catering to those who 
cere about the health and 
beauty of their hair 

CHARM 
BEAUTY SHOP 

One-half Block 
From The Campus 

Phone 2948 114 Lee St. 
Open Monday Noon Till 
Saturday Noon 



Men's, Ladies and Chifdrens 
all plastic raincoats 2 for $1.00 

Waste basket — Plastic or metal 
Your Choice 2 for $1.00 

Large selection of Ladies Spring Dresses 
and suits — priced $3.00 - $6.00 

Men's large suit cases — Only $5.00 each 

Ladies dacron and cotton blouses all colors 
and sizes — Only $1.00 each 

You'll find these and other outstanding 
values at BILL'S this weekend 

SHOP WITH US— YOU'LL BE GLAD YOU DID 

BILL'S DOLLAR STORE 

768 Front St Phcne 9475 



One of NSC's most promising track stars this year is 
Eddie Watt. He is currently training to run the two mile 
event and has already been the biggest surprise of the 
year in cross country track. 



PEN NYLAND 

1300 Washington Across From Peoples Motor Co. 

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 
8 A.M.-12 P.M. 

Free Transportation To And From 
The College - 8 A.M. - 11 P.M. 

SIX POOL TABLES 

(Brunswick, Gold Crown) 

TWO SNOOKER TABLES 
(Brunswick, Gold Crown) 

Shuffle Board - Domino Tables 
Moon Tables — Bowling Tables 
Shooting Gallery 

SNACK BAR -AIR CONDITIONED 

ENTERTAINMENT FOR ALL 
MEN - LADIES - CHILDREN 



BE SURE TO VISIT PENNYLAND THURSDAY FEB. 

18. Free 12 OZ. COLD CAN DRINKS AND ANY 

5c CANDY OF THEIR CHOICE TO EVERY CUS- 
TOMER ALL DAY. 



For F^rn - 

Visit PENNYLAND 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1965 




Sam wans, one of two seniors on the Demon Basketball 
team, has been one of the regular starters for the Demons 
and will be playing his last collegiate basketball during 
the next couple of weeks. 

Indoor Invitational Track Meet 
Scheduled For Prather Coliseum 



Prather Coliseum will be the 
site for the first scheduled invita- 
tional track meet to be held in- 
doors. The meet will be sponsored 
by the N Club Feb. 26 and 27 with 
high schools participating on the 
first night and colleges the next. 

Work is being done on construc- 
tion of wooden banked turns to 
turn the coliseum into a 10 lap 
track, one of four such facilities 
in the United States. 

The track will be four feet wide 



and will be 176 yards. A 10 lane 
area will be marked off in the 
center for sprints and hurdles. 
Sixty yard sprints and 60 and65 
yard hurdle events wil be run on 
the 90 yard straightway in the 
center. 

Eleven high schools have al- 
ready submitted entries. They are 
West Monroe, Bordelonville, Gold- 
onna, Crowley, North Caddo, 
S i k e s , Winnsboro, Raceland, 
Amite, Buckeye, and Port Allen. 



DOUBTING THOMAS? 
HOPEFUL AGNOSTIC? 



CMiifflmity h*» more to offer this hope, it h*t position 
proof in the form of a MIRACLE which was foretold, 
described and is intensely personal. Ask the R e ligions 
Leaders or send me a card marked ESP- 17. My reply is 
free, non-Denominational, Christian. Martyn W. Hart, 
Box 53, Glen Ridge, N.J. 07028 (USA). 



Future Demon Football Hopes Boosted 
By Signing Of 18 New Prep Standouts 



The NSC Demons football squad 
will be looking forward to ntxt fall 
as they welcome 18 new recruits. 
These players represent some of 
the finest talent ever recruited in 
a year's time. Coach Jack Clayton 
says he is pleased with the results 
of the recruiting efforts and be- 
lives he'll have the finest group of 
freshmen since he became head 
coach in 1957. 

Leading the list of players is 
Kenny Ferro of Warren Easton of 
New Orleans. Ferro is a 6-1, 210 
pounder who plays guard and also 
saw action as a linebacker. He was 
sought by such schools as Notre 
Dame, Auburn, and Southern Miss- 
issippi, and all-state lineman. 

Also from New Orleans will be 
Tommy Morales and Hylton Petit, 
both of East Jefferson. Petit is a 
5-10, 196 pound end who was an 
all-district selection, all-prep, and 
honorable mention all-state. Mor- 
ales is a 6-0, 185 pound all-district 
cornerback. 

Holly Ridge also donated two 
playes to the Demons cause. They 
are Henry (Bo) Miller and Eddie 
Sistrunk. Miller is a 6-2, 195 pound 
end and was highly sought after. 
He was a four letter man at Holly 
Ridge and was a high scorer in 
football and basketball. He is also 
a fine placekicker. Miller was all- 
district for three years and all- 
state for two years. Sistrunk is a 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
SERVICES 
Old Lemee House 
Jefferson St. 
Every Sunday 11:00 A.M. 
All are welcome 



5-7, 187 pound back. He also par- 
ticipated in basketball and track. 

From Pineville comes Steve 
Farrar, an all-district and all-state 
Lineman. The 5-11, 187 pound 
prepster was elected most valuable 
player for Pineville. 

From the Shreveport-Bossier 
Area will come Ronald Cox and 
Alvin Walker. Cox is a 6-2, 205 
pound lineman who attends Boss- 
ier High School. He was a member 
of the all-city team. Walker, who 
preps at Fair Park, was an all-city 
and all-district linebacker. He was 
also honorable mention all-state. 
He stands 5-9 and weighs 205 
pounds. 

Istrouma and Glen Oaks of 
Baton Rouge also contribute two 
players. From Istrouma come line- 
man Neal Simmons and half back 
Mike Herrington. From Glen Ooks 
are tackle John Tom Smith and 
guard Joseph Kimble. All are top 
performers. 

Three players will come from 
North Caddo of Vivian. They are 
W. B. Rowe, Jr., a guard; John 
Hall, III, a halfback; and Johnny 
Ray Alexander, a linebacker. 

Meyer Irby, Delhi fullback and 



Basketball Team 
Gets New Member 

Coach Huey W. Cranford wel- 
comed basketball newcomer to the 
campus. He is Frank Bamer of Park 
Forest, 111. Bamer enrolled at the 
college recently after his release 
from the service. He is a freshman 
in business administration. Bamer 
stands 6-5 and weighs in at 190 
pounds. He played prep ball under 
Brayley player who paced his team 
to and NIT championship. Bamer 
was named to the All-Third Army 
cage team after averaging 27 
points a game. 



linebacker, is another NSC recruit. 
He was an unanimous all-district 
selection in 1963. 

The Demons will also have an 
out-of-stater in the person of 
Randy Tate, a top full back from 
El Dorado, Ark. 



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FAST MATH QUIZ; 
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Don't Forget February 14 — 
VALENTINE'S DAY 

SEE OUR LARGE SELECTION OF 

Valentine Cards by AMBASSADOR 

AND 

Valentine Candy by 
KING'S and ELMER'S 

McCLUNG DRUG CO. 

Serving Natchitoches and NSC Since 1891 
Corner Front & Church Sts. Phone 2461 

FREE DELIVERY TO ALL COLLEGE DORMS 



Method of solution: Count the number of different Mustang models at 
your Ford Dealer's. He's added a racy Mustang 2+2 Fastback to his 
two other Valedictorial Performers-the Mustang Hardtop and Con- 
vertible ... for a total of 3 new Mustangs for 1965. Another bit of 
basic math can show how easy it is to fit Mustang's low monthly pay- 
ments into your budget (or 
dad's). Just matriculate in 
our free Mustang Educa- 
tion Course. There's only 
one other assignment: 
Test-drive a Mustang. 
What a field trip! 



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are extra cost. See your Ford Dealer for his selling price. 



Test-drive a Mustang at your Ferd Dealer's Free Ride Festival! 

NATCHITOCHES MOTOR CO., LTD. 
P.O. Box 1 780 Front Street 

Phone 3677 



FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 12, 1965 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 




Three New Graduate Degrees To Be 
Offered By NSC Music Department 



Dr. Gordon Flood 

Flood Receives 
Doctoral Degree 

Gordon A. Flood, assistant pro- 
fessor of music and voice and 
choral direction at Northwestern 
State College, has completed all 
requirements for ,i doctoral degree 
in music. 

The degree was conferred on Dr. 
Flood at Michigan State Univer- 
sity, in East Lansing, at the mid- 
year commencement. Topic of his 
dissertation was "Musi: and the 
Academically Talented College 
Student." 

Dr. Flood received his bachelor 
of music education and master of 
music degrees from the University 
of Nebraska and was instructor of 
music and director of the Men's 
Glee Club at Michigan State Uni 
versity before joining the NSC 
faculty in 1962. He is a member 
of Phi Delta Kappa, Phi Mu Alpha 
Sinfornia, Music Educators Nation- 
al Conference, and the Intercolleg 
iate Music Council. 



The Graduate Council at North 
western recently approved three 
new graduate programs in music, 
it was announced last week by Dr. 
Joseph B. Carlucci, head of the 
Music Department. 

Beginning with the current 
spring semester. Northwestern will 
offer a Master of Music degree in 
applied music (performance), mu- 
sic theory, or musical composition. 
Approval to offer this degree was 
granted by the State Board of Edu- 
cation in April 1963. 

The new offerings will consider- 
ably broaden the ever-expanding 
graduate program of the college 
and its service to the State of Lou- 
isiana. The Master of Music Educa- 



The Two-Party System 

(ACP)— The possibility of a 
Prohibition Party at the University 
of Kansas, Lawrence, appears dim, 
according to Dave Pomeroy, senior. 

THE UNIVERSITY DAILY 
KANSAN* says that Pomeroy was 
instrumental in getting an ad plac- 
ed in the college newspaper, seek- 
ing students who were interested 
inhaving such a party on campus. 
Only one person who responded 
was definitely interested. 



Natchitoches 
Laundromat 

936 College Avenue 

CONVENIENT TO 
ALL STUDENT? 

Open 24 hours a day 
7 days a week 



For The Best 
Food In Town 

Stop In 

At The 

WADDLE 'N 
GRILL 

Phone 4949 
HIGHWAY 1 SOUTH 



Faculty Member 
Has Composition 
Performed 

A Duo for flute and cello, com- 
posed by Dr. Abram M. Plum of 
the Northwestern music faculty, 
was performed at a meeting of 
the Music Forum in Sheveport, 
February 1. Performers were Don- 
ald Smith, flutist, and Eugene 
Rosheger, cellist, both members 
of the Sheveport Symphony Or- 
chestra. 

The meeting, which was devoted 
to the works of Louisiana com- 
posers, was held in the home of 
Mrs. Lalia Hurst White, 402 Colum- 
bia Street, Shreveport. Mrs. White 
is prominent in musical and drama- 
tic circles in the Sheveport area. 
The program chairman of the Mu- 
sic Forum, a Sheveport music club, 
is Mrs. Joyce Hobbs. 

Dr. Plum's Duo was written in 
July 1964. It is in two movements, 
entitled "Misterioso" and"Scher- 
zando". Other compositions by Dr. 
Plum will be performed at pro- 
grams in Natchitoches on Marchl8 
and May 13. The composer is pres- 
ently in his third year as Assist- 
ant Professor of Music at North- 
wester. 



tion degree in vocal music educa- 
tion, instrumental music educa- 
tion or piano has been offered 
since the inception of the College's 
Graduate School in 1955. 

Other recent innovations in the 
Music Department include: an ex- 
perimental program for high school 
seniors, who may earn college cred- 
it in music; a music minor for stu- 
dents in the Schools of Arts and 
Sciences and Applied Arts and 
Sciences; offerings in Sacred Mu- 
sic and Organ. 

All of these developments are 
in keeping with Music Department's 
aim to give every music student a 
sound education in music in pre- 
paration for careers as teachers 
and performers. Further informa- 
tion may be obtained from Dr. Car- 
lucci. 



Guidance Meeting 
To Be Held Here 

The sixth anual Guidance Con 
ference sponsored by Northwest 
ern and the State Board of Educa 
tion for the purpose of directing 
thinking toward counseling and 
guidance in the elementary school, 
will be held in Prather Coliseum, 
Feb. 16r 

The conference will deal with 
the subject of the elementary 
school counselor, his functions and 
image, and the need for counseling 
in the elementary school. 

Dr. John Ferguson, professor of 
education at the University of 
Missouri and adviser to candidates 
majoring in elementary school 
guidance, will deliver the opening 
address at 9 a.m. Dr. Ferguson has 
been a key figure in the develop- 
ment of counseling and guidance 
in elementary schools in the State 
of Missouri. He is a member of the 
American Personnel and Guidance 
Association and the Association 
for Counselor Education and Sup- 



Phi Alpha Theta 
Initiates Four 

Phi Alpha Theta, honorary aca- 
demic history fraternity, held in- 
itiation for four new members 
late last semester at the home of 
Dr. and Mrs. Tom Wells. Mrs. 
Jane Nahm, Jimmy Teague. John 
Slate and Patricia Unrath are the 
new initiates. 

Pi chapter of Phi Alpha Theta 
was first initiated on this campus 
in 1934. In the spring of 1964. it 
was reactivated. Requirements for 
membership are at least twelve 
hours in history with an average 
of B or above. Phi Alpha Theta is 
a member of the Association of 
College Honor Societies. 

Officers for the coming year are 
Jeannie Marler, president; John 
Slade, vice-president; Patricia Un- 
rath, secretary-treasurer. Members 
include Dr. Kyser, Dean George 
Stokes, Drs. Eversull, Phillips. 
Rawson, Simmons, Wells, and Hen- 
lien, Mr. Quintin, Mr. Gallien. and 
Mr. Senn. Faculty sponsor is Miss 
Marietta LeBreton. 

The 22 parishes expected to par- 
ticipate in the conference include 
Allen, Avoyelles, Beauregard, Bi- 
enville, Bossier, Caddo, Catahoula, 
Claiborne, Concordia, DeSoto, E- 
vangeline Grant Jackson, LaSalle, 
Lincoln, Natchitoches. Rapides, 
Red River, Sabine, Vernon. Web- 
ster, and Winn. 




by Sargent 
Shriver 

16 pages of illustrations 

At all bookstores. 
Cloth, $4.95. Paper, $1.45 



A stirring book 
by the Director 
of the 
Peace Corps 
and the War 
on Poverty 

"This book combines the 
vision and hardheaded, 
practical touch of its author, 
one of the ablest new figures 
in public life of our genera- 
tion. It is a book to give 
courage and hope to the 
anxious and fearful, and to 
confirm the faith of those 
who see what a great future 
lies before mankind. If 
Sargent Shriver's ringing 
words could be read by mil- 
lions — as I hope it will be — 
it would advance the cause 
of peace and tell Americans 
more about their true selves 
than any book I have seen 
in many a year. It is a dis- 
tinguished and thoughtful 
book by a shining person- 
ality." 

— David E. Lilbenthal 
"An extremely valuable re- 
source and contribution in 
the War on Poverty around 
the world and in our own 
backyard." — Professor 
Patricia Sexton, New York 
University 



(M, New York, N. Y. 10016 





Dianne McBride 

Graduate Finishes 
WAC Basic Course 

Second Lieutenant Diane C. Mc- 
Bride graduated from the WAC 
Officer Basic Course at exercises 
held at WAC Chapel in Fort Mc- 
lellan, Alabama. 

Lieutenant McBride, a graduate 
of Northwestern State College, 
has been assigned as executive of- 
ficer, WAC Detachment, Fort Sher- 
idan, Illinois. 



MAKE 

YOUR 

FAMILY 

AT HOME 
Away From Home. 




SHAMROCK MOTEL 



Highway 1 South 



Phone 5566 




Singing goes better refreshed. 
And Coca-Cola — with that special zing 
but never too sweet — 
refreshes best. 



things gO 

^with 

Coke 




Bottled under the autnority of Ike Coca-Cola Company by: 



tcki?oshss Cora-Cola Bottiing Company 



Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1965 



LETTERS 

To the Editor and the Student 
Body of Northwestern: 

As usual our NSC students have 
done it again! It's bad enough to 
walk out on the Brandywine Sing- 
ers and the Four Seasons, but for 
us to walk out on an international 
star like Al Hirt is unforgivable. 

Mr. Hirt out did himself in try- 
ing to make up for the unavoid- 
able delay caused by bad weather. 
Se we thank him by our actions 
Monday night. The least we could 
have done if we felt we had to, 
was to have left during the inter- 
mission, which was undeniably 
short for a performance like that. 

If the students aren't careful 
the word will get around, and the 
next time the Artist Series at- 
tempts to bring big name enter- 
tiners to us we may just find our- 
selves out of luck. 

We suggest that the Student 
Council send Mr. Hirt an official 
apology for the actions of the stu- 
dents they represent. 
Sincerely, 

Richard Bhoussard, James Bourg. 
John Anais, Stan Parkan, Johnny 
Mulina. 

Dorothy Melcher, Kenneth Klin- 
hard, Charles Samuel, Brian Brew- 
ton, Ron Whitmore. 

Kathleen Bishop, Wanda Rad- 
ford, Mary Stovall, Sherry Barrett, 
Buddy Famores. 

Bill Finical, Jan Callaway, James 
Campbell, Eric Steinhauser, Den- 
nis Moulard. 




NSC, Tech Hold Dual Tests 



Representatives of Northwestern i tests to determine recipients of 
State College and Louisiana Tech 1 15 academic scholarships to be a- 
will be at Bolton High School, j warded by each if the institutions. 
Alexandria, and Fair Park High | The scholarship pay stipends of 
School, Shreveport, Saturday to j S600 a year for four year's study al 
conduct the second in a series of | the respective colleges, 
cooperative testing sessions. 

Representatives of Tech and 
Northwestern are cooperating in 
the administration of a battery of 



Steve Blount, student body president, gets a brief music 
lesson from Al Hirt following his performance in the 
NSC Coliseum Monday night. Hirt was brought to NSC 
by the Artist Series and the Student Council. 



Louisiana Studies Institute 
Announces Publication 



Happiness At NSC 

By Jack O'Neal 

Happiness is an empty mailbox, 
and it has been that way since 
September. 

Happiness is hot tamales for the 
Sunday night meal, and you're 
not a Mexican. 

Happiness is just missing the next 
highest grade by one point, 
and you're already on probat- 
ion. 

Happiness is a boring instructor, 
and you sit on the front row. 

Happiness is receiving a phone 
call on the third floor, and you 
live on the first floor. 

Happiness is a stalled car on Chap- 
lin's Lake at 7:55, and your 
date is a freshman. 

Happiness is having a eight o'clock 
classes, six days a week. 

Happiness is being next in line to 
enter the bookstore, and they 
close for lunch. 

Happiness is waiting a half hour 
in line in the cafeteria, and 
you forget your ID card. 

Happiness is having a class at the 
Women's Gym followed by 
one at the Colesium, and you 
don't have a car. 

Happiness is a filled parking lot, 
and you're late for class. 

Happiness is finding a newspaper 
in the field house, and the 
sports page and comics are 
missing. 

Happiness is your advisor, and he 
doesn't even know who you 
are. 

Happiness is having three required 
courses all taught at the same 
time, and you were a 4-2 grad- 
uating senior. 
Happiness is a visit to Maggio's. 

and they're out of popcorn. 
Happiness is a relaxing shower 
after a hard day, and there 
isn't any hot water. 
Happiness is having only three 
final exams, and they're all 
on the same day. 
Happiness is a valid excuse for a 
class, and it's rejected by the 
attendance officer. 
Happiness is living in an air con- 
ditioned dorm when it's 90 
degrees, and the air condition- 
ing isn't working. 
Happiness is a smiling professor, 
and he's still smiling when he 
gives you an "F". 
Happiness is a new umbrella on 
a rainy day, and someone 
"borrows" it from you while 
you're eating. 
Happiness is eating in St. Denis 
-ONCE! 



Announcement of publication of 
the Winter issue of Louisiana 
Studies has been made by the Lou- 
isiana Studies Institute at North- 
western. 

Louisiana Studies is a quarterly 
journal which began publication 
in 1962 and is devoted to publica- 
tion of articles about Louisiana 
or of interest to Louisianians. Fea- 
tured in the winter issue is an 
article entitled "Faulkner and the 
Great White Father," by M. E. 
Bradford, assistant professor of 
English at NSC whose field of 
special interest is Southern liter- 
ature. 

Other articles appearing in the 
issue are "The Story of Fort Beau- 
regard, Part One," by Edwin C. 
Bearss, regional research histor- 
ian for the National Parks Ser- 
vice at Vicksburg, Miss.; "North- 
west Louisiana as Seen by Timo- 
thy Flint," the NSC Phi Kappa 
Phi prize-winning essay for 1964 
on a Louisiana subject by a col- 
lege undergraduate, by Georgia 
Johnson Cavanaugh, a student at 

caneTheatrT^ 

Natchitoches, La. Phone 2922 



LSU; "Selected Characterises of 
Louisiana Population Migration," 
by William W. Hannaman, of Bat- 
on oRuge; "Basket Making," by- 
George V. Massoth, instructor of 
anthropology at NSC; and "The 1* 
House," by Dr. George A. Stokes, 



PEACE CORPS 
VISITS NSC 

A Peace Corps representative 
was on campus yesterday and to- 
day interviewing prospective Peace 
Corps members. Representing the 
Corps was Robert L. Wrin, who 
recently returned from a two-year 
assignment in Nigeria. 

Wren, who has been visiting 
collegese and universities as part 
of a recruiting program for the 
Corps since his return from Ni- 
geria, conducted interviews on the 
Campus for the purpose ol ex- 
plaining the volunteer program to 
interested students. 



DON 

Theatre 



BOX OFFICE OPENS 

Mon. Fri 5:45 

Sat. & Sun 12:45 



dean of the School of Arts and 
Sciences at Northwestern. 

Single copies of ?he Snidiefs are 
priced at $1. Copies of ail past is- 
sues are available at $1 except the 
issue commemorating the 250th 
anniversary of Natchitoches which 
is $2. Present and past issues may 
be obtained by subscription at the 
rate of $3.50 for any four consecu- 
tive issues. Subscriptions or single 
copies may be ordered from Louis- 
iana Studies Institute North- 
western. 



NOW SHOWING 



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Saturday 
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TONIGHT AND SATURDAY 



Friday - Saturday 
TRIPLE FEATURE 



X, Man 
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— Plus — 

Teenage Zombies 

— Plus — 

Monster From 
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Sunday - Tuesday 



'FROM THE TERRACE" 
Paul Newman 
Joanne Woodward 
In Color 



"CALIFORNIA" 

Ray Milland 
Barbara Stanwyck 
In Color 



SieeisjS Shewing Sun.-Thurs. 



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STEVE 
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Featuring 

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Produced By GIORGIO VENTURINI 
Directed By ALBERT BAND 
A MEDALLION PICTURES RELEASE IN COLOR 



Wednesday - Thursday 



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FOOTBALL HIGHLIGHTS 



OF 1964 




A UNIVERSAL 
RELEASE 



Northwestern Sets Record Spring Enrollment 




urrent S 



auce 



VOL. LI — No. 17 Northwestern State College, Natchitoches La. Friday, Feb. 19, 1965 




M. C. Lindsey. (left) manager of Chrevrolet's New Orleans zone office of General 
Motors Corporation, presented several automotive components to be used as training 
aids to the Industrial Education Department at Northwestern last week. Presentation 
was made to Dr. Walter J. Robinson, (center), professor and head of the Department 
of Industrial Education. Also on hand for the presentation was Basil Cobb, Natchtoches 
Chrevrolet dealer. 



Special Speech Clinic Being Held On 
NSC Campus Every Saturday Morning 



Spring semester Saturdays at addition to traditional speech cor- 
Northwestern will provide 26 area ' 
youths with an excellent oppor- 



tunity to correct their speech de 
fects as the Special Education De 
partment launches a weekly clinic 
from 9 to 11:30 a.m. in Warren 
East on. 

Dr. Charles Palmer and Mr. John 
Bernthal, speech and hearing con- 
sultants, organized and now ad- 
minister the speech correction 
clinic which aids young people 
from the ages of five to 17. 

Graduate students, Mrs. Patricia 
Kennedy and Mrs. Patricia Smith, 
with the assistance of undergradu- 
ates conduct the actual sessions. 

Initial interviews were held Feb. 
6, and the clinic began full scale 
operation one week later. Though 
the students who come from as far 
as 70 miles away, occasionally ex- 
press themselves with finger 
paints, clay and the plastic media, 
the clinic is not an art class. 

Dr. Palmer stated that, "The 
clinic provides the student clini- 
cian the opportunity to observe 
and participate in a variety of 
therapeutic techniques." The pro- 
gram includes speech stimulation 
and anxiety reduction activities in 



lection procedures. Therapy is of- 
fered on both large group and 



Purple Jackets 
Plan Spring Trip 

Northwestern Purple Jackets 
met Wednesday to discuss plans 
for the annual Purple Jacket Trip. 
The honor group has chosen to 
visit the Gulf Hills Dude Ranch, 
Ocean Springs, Miss., but plans 
have not been completed. 

Money-making schemes to raise 
funds for the annual trip and the 
amount of money earned by the 
organization during registration 
were other topics of discussion. 



small group basis, as well as in- 
dividually. 

Evidence of the clinic's immedi- 
ate accpetance and of the generous 
attitude of everyone connected 
with its conception and operation 
is amply displayed in the number 
of students on the waiting list 
already. 



Education Dept. 
Makes New Gains 

By Ann Massey 

Until this past fall, the depart- 
ments of education and psycholo- 
gy at Northwestern had been com- 
bined into one single department. 
It was then the Department of 
Education and Psychology. But a 
change has been made — a very 
good and purposeful change. 

NSC now has a distinct Depart- 
ment of Education and a distinct 
Department of Psychology. This 
inflection was due primarily to 
the purpose of presenting a pro- 
fessional education course of teach- 
ers. 

The Department of Education is 
headed by Dr. L. S. Simmons. 
There are eight full-time and four 
part-time faculty members. The 
staff members have received their 
educations in a variety of institu- 
tions. 

The teachings education pro- 
gram at NSC has to be approved 
by the State Department of Educa- 
tion. The program is accredited by 
the National Council for Accredi- 
dation of Teachers (NCATE). A 
team of educational experts repre- 
senting NCATE will be on the 
NSC campus next week, February 
22-24. A voluminous report of over 



Blue Key Group 
To Present Nine 
Movies This Year 

The Blue Key Honor Fraternity 
will present this semester nine out- 
standing motion pictures for the 
entertainment of the student body. 
"Barabbas," starring Anthony 
Quinn, was shown in Prather Coli- 
sium on February 6. 

Future attractions include on 
March 6, "If a Man Answers;" 
March 20, "Walk on the Wild Side;" 
March27, "Bell, Book and Candle;" 
April 3, "Pal Joey;" April 10, "Di- 
amondhead," May 1, "Forty Pounds 
of Trouble; "May 8, "Suddenly 
Last Summer;" and May 15, "Best 
of Enemies." 

Efforts are being made to secure 
use of the Fine Arts Auditorium 
for these dates. If necessary, future 
showings in Prather Colesium will 
be scheduled with the use of a 
larger screen and better sound 
equipment. 

The 25 cent admission fee is used 
solely to defray the costs of rent- 
ing the feature films and cartoon. 



150 pages will be presented. 

During this present spring sem- 
ester, 200 students are engaged in 
student teaching here at NSC. 
These student teachers are placed 
in four schools in Natchitoches, 
three schools in Sheveport, one 
school in Winnfield, and one 
school in Alexandria. All of these 
students have no trouble in find- 
ing teaching jobs. Two very out- 
standing student teachers last fall 
were Mr. NSC, Jimmy Berry, and 
Miss NSC, Barbara Martin. 

The quest to produce better and 
more informed teachers has always 
been one of prime and essential im- 
portance to NSC. The program 
keeps going forward. Better teach- 
ers for the future from NSC are in 
sight. 



3965 Register For 
Spring Semester 

Final enrollment figures for the 
1965 spring semester at North- 
western were released this week 
by Otis R. Crew, registrar. Accord- 
j ing to Mr. Crew's records there are 
3965 students currently enrolled 
in NSC. 

Although this is a drop of 313 
students below the level of the fall 
semester, it is an increase of 667 
students or 20.2 percent over the 
comparable 1964 figure. This is 
also an increase of 150 percent 
during the last five years and an 
increase of 230 percent for the 
same period in 1955. 

A breakdown by schools finds 
the School of Education ahead 
with 1501 students followed by Ap- 
plied Arts and Sciences with 899, 
Arts and Sciences with 746, the 
Graduate School with 554, and the 



School of Nursing trails with 265 
students. 

Arts and Sciences leads the un- 
dergraduate schools in gains with 
a total increase of 19 percent, but 
it is well behind the gains made 
by the Graduate School. Graduate 
enrollment jumped from 288 stu- 
dents last spring to 554 this sem- 
ester for a gain of 92.4 percent. 
This is the largest enrollment ever 
recorded in a regular semester and 
emphasizes the fact that the Grad- 
uate School has enjoyed a steady 
growth since it was established in 
1954. 

Again this semester the men out- 
number the women students en- 
rolled in Northwestern. There are 
2035 men students as compared to 
1930 women students. A break- 
down of men and women by 
schools reveals: Applied Arts and 
Sciences, 739 men to 160 women; 
Arts and Sciences, 536 men to 210 
women; Education, 535 men to 966 
women; Nursing, 7 men to 258 
women; and the Graduate School 
has 218 men to 336 women. 



Former Cuban Ambassador To Speak At 
First Assembly Of Spring Semester 



Sergio Rojas, exiled Cuban am 
bassador, will speak on "The Com- 
ing Explosion in Latin America" 
at the first assembly of the spring 
semester. The lecture will be held 
in the Fine Arts auditorium, Wed- 
nesday at 10 a.m. 

Former Ambassador Sergio Ro- 
jas served as Cuban Ambassador 
to Great Britain from January, 195S 
until June, 1960, when he broke 

Local Bird Artist 
Displays Her Work 

Birds and Wild Flowers, a water 
color exhibit by Mrs. Edna B. 
Prudhomme of Campti, were shown 
in the art gallery of the Fine Arts 
Building at Northwestern Wednes- 
day afternoon from 2 until 4 p.m. 
A total of 56 paintings, 39 of birds 
and 17 of wild flowers were shown. 

The wild flowers were picked on 
hunting trips with her husband 
and son, and painted at home, Mrs. 
Prud'homme said. Birds were ob- 
served while feeding on seed placed 
in the yard. 

Mrs. Prud'homme's very detailed 
work was done with a crow quill 
pen and ink. Her most detailed 
work shown was a picture of a 
large hawk in flight. Mrs. Prud'- 
homme spent from four to six 
hours a day for nine days on a 
large picture of a pair of blue jays. 

To add to the atmosphere, a re- 
cording of bird calls was played 
on the phonograph. Small leafless 
trees were paced around the gal- 
lery. 

Coffee and cookies were served 
to departing guests. 



with the Castro government. Re- 
signing after a violent meeting 
with the President, Minister of 
Foreign Affairs, and Undersecre- 
tary, Rojas stated that he would 
not serve a Communist govern- 
ment. 

Rojas now lives in Spain, and 
from there is active in the move- 
meet to see Castro ousted from 
his Communist dictatorship in 
Cuba. 

He participated in the Bay of 
Pigs invasion and has spent a good 
deal of time in Germany during 
the past year studying the pros- 
perous economic revival that has 
taken place there. 

Rojas returned to the country 
and in the face of arrest and pos- 
sible death submitted his resig- 
nation. Before the government 
acted on his request he sought 
asylum in the Argentine Embassy 
and 65 days later fled the country. 

During the past two years he has 
brought his stirring tale to over 
500 colleges and high-level busi- 
ness groups in the United States. 

A coffee will be held for Am- 
bassador Rojas after the assembly. 
The head of each organization on 
campus has an invitation to lunch 
with the Ambassador in one of the 
campus dining halls. 

The Sigma Tau Gamma Fratern- 
ity will act as ushers, and the 
ROTC Black Knight Drill Team 
will present the colors and lead 
the assemby in the Pledge of Al- 
legiance. 

All students are urged to attend 
this assembly. Classes will be dis- 
missed in order that those who 
wish to attend may do so. 



Campus Calendar 

MONDAY (Feb. 22) 

Stage Band Rehearsal, Fine Arts Auditorium, 8 a.m-11 p.m. 
TUESDAY (Feb. 23) 

Stage Band Concert, Fine Arts Auditorium, 8 p.m. 
Basketball Game, La. Tech, Ruston 

WEDNESDAY (Feb. 24) 

Regional Health Institute, Coliseum, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. 
Assembly, Ambassador Rojas, Fine Arts Aud., 10 a.m. 
Election of AWS Officers, Fne Arts Auditorium, 8 p.m. 
THURSDAY (Feb. 25) 

Music Festival, solo & small ensemble, Fine Arts Auditor- 
ium, Fine Arts Building, 8 a.m.-ll p.m. 
Naval Flight Program Information Team, Campus 

FRIDAY (Feb. 26) 

Music Festival, solo & small ensemble, Fine Arts Auditor- 
ium, Fine Arts Building, 8 a.m-11 p.m. 
Naval Flight Program Information Team, Campus 

SATURDAY (Feb. 27) 

Music Festival, solo & small ensemble, Fine Arts Auditor- 
ium, Fine Arts Building, 8 a.m-11 p.m. 
Delta Zeta Spring Formal, Student Center, 8-12 p.m. 
SUNDAY (Feb. 28) 

Band Rehearsal, Fine Arts Auditorium, 8 a.m.-ll p.m. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1965 




In Play, "The Torch Bearers" 
Students Praised For Performance 

By Danny Gayer 

"The Torchbearers", a boisterous comedy written by 
George Kelly and presented at the Little Theatre and the Fine 
Arts Auditorium of Northwestern Tuesday, Wednesday, and 
Thursday nights, rocked its respective audiences with laughter 
as they responded with well-deserved applause. 

Jim Hawthorne's presentation 
the only sane character, "Mr. 
Ritter", can only be topped by 
his wonderfully contagious laugh- 
ter. His poor stage-struck wife was 
played by Jayne Makar, who over- 
comes a color-crazy sewing basket 
and two swirling green dresses to 
portray the change in "Mrs. Rit- 
ter" from just a housewife to only 
an actress. 

Then a lovely old chatter-box by 
the name of "Mrs. Pampinelli" 
flies into the scene on the wings of 
her ever present gestures. She bub- 
bles and bores with enough breath 
to last each sentence a year or kill 
each listener in hopes of the end. 
One can't help smiling at the ser- 
ious thoughts she gives her "thea- 
tre", for Frances Councill has got- 
ten something into this role worth 
talking about. 

"Nelly Fell" (that's Mrs. P.'s 
sidekick) played by Anne Weaver 
is just vhe thing to complete the 
round of community players. One 
of her loveliest moments comes as 
she executes a refreshing double 
take near the beginning of the 
show. 

Butch Toland with a sound, 
strong delivery and a vague act- 
or's misconception of reality as 
the rediculous "Huxley Hosse- 
frosse is terrific. Ask anyone who 
saw the show. His golden oppor- 
tunity to play the ham with a legit- 
imate excuse finally arrived and 
he does it elegantly with a bit of 
"savoiz-faire". Every movement 
dictates comedy from the hat on 
the cane, to the defeated, no-ciga- 
rettes-look, to the roar of a "no" 
followed by a polite "thank you," 
this actor really rolls them in the 
aisles. 

"Mr. Spindler", Harvey Wilson's 
creation, is just the fumbling fro- 
lic Harvey makes him as he adds 
a sour note to more than one ff 
"Mrs. P.'s" famous speeches. Doyle 
Williams, as the reserved "Teddy 
Spearing", along with Gordon Par- 
ker who played a character named 
"Twiller", but could easily have 
been mistaken for Charlie Chap- 
Iain, were to be commended for 
fine performances also. 

Pat Delano brought an accent 
trace with a good idea where the 
gin was kept, into the role of Jen- 
ny. Delores Russel created the role 
of Florence, the star of the play 
within the play, who rattled lines 
during "rehearsal" regardless of 
all extraneous noise. 

Michael Caldwell and Charlotte 
Ellis shared the role of Cara Shep- 
pard, adding a ridiculous note of 
sadness to the "disastrous produc- 
tion of the play inside the play." 
Gary Piper as the stage manager 
of the flop tagged the second act 
with one of the most exasperated 
yes's I've ever heard. 

Hysteria was upon the audience 
before they knew it, as the crazy 
spirit of backstage pervaded the 
second act atmosphere, while a 
mustache crumbled and fell, a 
hand go». jammmed in the left door 
and eveu the door itself got stuck. 
What could be worse? The set 
might collaspe — it did, or the cur- 
tain could refuse to operate and, 
to be certain, it did. 

Here's where the play really 
moved at lightning pace. The act- 
ors were in need of strong direc- 
tion and they got it from Dr. Edna 
West. They used costumes, lights, 
scenery and props to the greatest 
advantage — a large hand of grati- 
tude to Mr. Frank Magers. You just 
couldn't believe it all unless you 
saw it. It was that funny. 



KAPPA ALPHA 

At their last regular meeting, 
Gamma Psi Chapter of Kappa Al- 
pha Order was visited by two rep- 
resentatives of a Sheveport archi- 
tectual firm who were there to 
consult with the chapter about 
some possiblities of design and 
services of a new dormitory type 
house for the Chapter. The repre- 
sentatives, Mr. Jack Huddleston, 
and Mr. Charles Frith, were from 
the firm of Huddleston, Emerson, 
Stiller, & Associates. 

The schedule of events during 
the past week also included the 
initation of twelve new members. 
Tommy Nichols, Sheveport; Dickie 
Robertson, Sheveport; Jere Daye, 
Sheveport; Don Snell, Sheveport; 
Roy DeBleiux, Natchitoches; De- 
laine Durham, Shreveport. 

Steven Gregg, Natchitoches; 
Tommy Lewis, N a t c h it oches; 
Charles Smith, Hodge; Warren 
Fraser, Many; and Dillion Mat- 
lock, Sheveport. 

Wednesday night, the chapter 
had one of it's annual spring rush 
parties at the KA House. Barbe- 
cued hamburgers were served, and 
films of the 1964 Old South Cele- 
bration were shown to the rushees, 
after a short by the No. 1 Joe 
Traigle. 

During the past few weeks sev- 
eral of Gamma Psi entered in mat- 
rimony: Junior Mullins, No. 2, 
married our 1964 Kappa Alpha 
Rose, Sandy Corken, Dick Clark, 
No. 3, married Chris Newsom. The 
members of the chapter would like 
to congratulate these couples, and 
wish them much happiness. 

A few new beards are being 
noticed around the campus this 
week as some of the members be- 
gin to prepare for the biggest 
event of the social year, the Old 
South Weekend. This year the 
chapter looks forward to an even 
bigger and better time than last 
year, with John Fred and the Play- 
boys playing at the ball. 



AWS Makes Plans 
For Spring Events 

Northwestern Associated Wo- 
men Students made plans for the 
annual Honors Banquet and the e- 
lection of next years' officers at 
their meeting Monday night in 
Varnado Drawing Room. 

"Jewels "in ~Her~Crown"~will be 
the theme of the banquet, the big- 
gest spring activity of the AWS. 
There will be no speaker so that 
more time can be spent on em- 
phasizing the outstanding achieve- 
ments of the students who have 
excelled in their respective fields. 

Each residence hall will be re- 
sponsible for some facet of the 
decorations. The house directors 
from each dormitory will sell tic- 
kets. All women students may pur- 
chase tickets for 50 cents. Dinner 
will be served in smorgasbord fash- 
ion. 

Nominations for officers of the 
AWS were made by each resi- 
dence hall at house meetings on 
Wednesday night. Each dormitory 
was permitted to nominate a can- 
didate for each office. 

Election will take place in the 
Fine Arts Auditorium Feb. 24, at 
8 p.m. Dean of Women, Lucile M. 
Hendrick, urged the girls to con- 
sider the qualifications of each 
candidate before making a final 
choice. 

Dean Hendrick also requested 
that the women students on cam- 
pus be more conscious of their at- 
tire and manners. 



SIGMA TAU GAMMA 

Sigma Tau Gamma looks for- 
ward to a spring semester full of 
fun and brotherhood. After the 
best fall semester ever, Sigma Tau 
finds a spring calender full of e- 
vents which should make for no 
dull moments this semester. 

First on the list is initiation, 
which is planned in early March. 
Congratulations to the 23 pledges 
who made their grades and good 
luck as they complete their pledg- 
ing program. 

The pledge class elected new of- 
ficers at their last meeting and the 
new officers are: Lionel Bourg, 
president; Joe Callaway, secretary- 
treasurer; Bob Koll, Sgt.-at-Arms; 
and Ken Touchet, chaplain. Con- 
gratulations to these boys on this 
honor. 

The White Rose Ball has been 
set for March 13 and both mem- 
bers and pledges are hard at work 
to make this the best ball ever. 
Andy Mulina is in charge this year 
and it should be a great success. 

Rick Hudson is in charge of 
Spring Rush activities this year 
and Sigma Tau looks forward to 
a fine Spring Pledge Class. 

Plans are underway for the com- 
pletion of our new "House on the 
Hill." The Taus are very pround 
of their new house and are anxious 
to see it fully completed. Plans 
include the laying of a patio in the 
back which should provide much 
enjoyment with the arrival of 
warmer weather. 

Other activities in the not too 
distant future include the annual 
Founder's Day Banquet with a visit 
from our national executive secre- 
tary expected and the Supressed 
Desire party which usually serves 
as a fitting climax to the year's 
events. 

Sigma Tau has two basketball 
teams entered in the Intramural 
competition this year and looks for- 
ward to a good season. 

The pledge class is presently 
making plans for its annual work 
day at the historic Lemee House 
here in Natchitoches. Sigma Tau 
is always eager to be of assistance 
to the civic organizations here in 
Demonland. 

Congratulations go out to Bro- 



To be featured in the Stage Band Concert scheduled for 
Tuesday, 8 p. m, in the Northwestern Fine Arts Audi- 
torium are singers, (Left to Right) Betty Clegg, Wayne 
Meachum, Jamie Clark, and Bettie Moore. There will be 
no admission charge. 



Music Students To Appear On TV 



The Northwestern Department 
of Music will present the third in 
a series of television recitals on 
the College Music Hall, KSLA-TV, 



Maxwell, and Sam Lucero who 
have been selected for the "Who's 
thers John Weffenstette, James 
Who in American Colleges andUn- 
iversities." This is certainly an 
honor of which we can be proud. 
Congratulations also go out to 
Brothers Eugene "Rural" Smith on 
his recent marriage to Miss Sue 
Burgdorf and Pat Sutherland and 
Sam Lucero on their recent grad- 
uation. Sigma Tau also wishes to 
welcome back Brother Ken Rein- 
hardt who was out of school last 
fall because of illness. 

The Taus woud also like to send 
a hello to Fred "The Head" Elzen 
of Elzen's Grocery & Market in 
Minden, La. We would like to 
see him down for the White Rose 
Ball. 



Channel 12 Shreveport, on Febru- 
ary 27, at one or one-thirty in the 
afternoon. 

Featured student performers 
will be James Randall, senior trom- 
bone major from Vidalia; Larry 
Wiley, junior French horn major 
from Excelsior Springs, Mo; and 
Branko Stojadinovic, senior 
violin major from Glen Ellyn, 111. 

Randall and Wiley will be ac- 
companied by Dr. Abram Plum of 
the NSC music faculty and Stoja 
dinovic will be accompanied bj 
Richard Smith, freshman piano ma 
jor from Bogue Chitto, Miss. Ran 
dall and Wiley are students of Mr. 
Dwight G. Davis and Stojadinovic 
studies with Mr. John Maltese. 

Appearing as intermission speak- 
er will be Dr. Alan Crosby, head of 
the Physical Sciences Department. 
He will discuss programs in science 
offered at Northwestern. 




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'65-best year yet to go see your Ford Dealer 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1965 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



Editorials 



Our Beautiful Campus 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 




YOU MAY Ai9 WELL- OPEN UP - 1 OVEKH EAPD ONlE 
OF THE £OYS DCWN^TAies VOU MAP A 

gETAUTIFUL MOPEL Up /N YOUK EOO/Af" 




Student Council 
Minutes 

The regular meeting of the NSC 
Student Council was held in Bul- 
lard Hall at 6 p. m. February 11. 
The minutes of the previous meet- 
ing were read and approved. The 
roll was called. 

President Blount reported that 
an estimate had been obtained 
from a private company on the 
cost of publishing a spring Stu- 
dent Directory. The company will 
print 3,500 copies of the directory 
by March 15 for $833. Stan Bran- 
ton moved that the Council have 
the company publish the directory 
this spring with the Council pay- 
ing for the cost of the books and 
furnishing them to the students 
free. 

Barbara Wallace raised the ques- 
tion as to whether the Council 
had purchased a new flag. It was 
reported that the Council had pur- 
chased a new flag during the fall 
semester, and had given it to the 
ROTC. 

Wallace also raised the question 
as to whether Religious Emphasis 
Week had been called off. It was 
reported that the committee had 
not met this semester, and that 
this would be decided at the first 
meeting. 

J. O. Charrier reported that LSU 
has called off their talent show; 
therefore, the audition here at 
NSC has been canceled. 

Charrier also reported that the 
entertainment committee had met. 
The committee will prepare sam- 
ple ballots which will be distrib- 
uted throughout the dorms in or- 
der that the students may select 
the entertainment they want to 
see for the spring semester. There 
will be seven or eight different 
classes of music listed on the bal- 
lot. The committee will try to list 
definite entertainment choices that 
fall within the committee's budget 
under each of the classes. 

R. J. Ardoin asked that litter 
be picked up by the fence next 
to the football field. 

Carrier reported that it was 
difficult to use the Louisiana 
Room in the library because of the 



PASSING IN REVIEW 




By PERRY ANGLE 



Practice makes Perfect. 

That adage has a great deal of 
truth in it, for there are few things 
man can attempt that does not re- 
quire a great amount of work in 
order that it can be executed well. 

Even apparently simple things, 
such as running, have an amazing 
amount of detail which must be 
done correctly in order for the 
greatest efficiency, details which 



limited number of hours it is open. 
Dean Fulton will check into it. 

Doug Giles, Tommy Putnam, 
Stan Branton, Milton Rhea, and 
Calbert Marcantel will work at the 
Wednesday night dance. 

Carolyn Thomas asked that a 
walk be constructed to the coli- 
seum for the students who have 
classes on the building. Dean Ful- 
ton reported that the construction 
of a sidewalk to the coliseum was 
under consideration. 

Putnam proposed that the re- 
quirements should be the same on 
the rifle team and on the drill 
team for earning a sweater. Put- 
nam proposed that five semesters 
should be required in both organ- 
izations for earning a sweater. It 
was reported that even though the 
Council purchased the sweaters 
they did so on the advice of the 
ROTC and did not set up the 
requirements. 

Dean Fulton spoke to the Coun- 
cil on the cultural standards on 
the campus. Fulton raised the 
questions as to whether the min- 
ority, not the majority, of the 
students were setting this stand- 
ard. In regard to dress, do the 
majority of the students approve 
of thong sandles and bermuda 
shorts as proper attire. If they do 
not, they should speak out to 
correct this. There is also a pro- 
blem of cleanliness on the campus, 
because a few students throw 

(See Student Council, page 6) 



can be learned only by practicing 
them. 

And when it comes to details, 
and the necessity of practicing 
them, few sports are more demand- 
ing than close-order drill. 

Because of this a great deal of 
practice is needed, for a drill team 
is made up of individuals who 
must learn to move in absolute 
unison, there can be no deviation 
by any member. And so it happens 
that the Black Knights practice 
year-round. 

They don't have to. Some teams 
teams spend ony a few hours a 
week marching together. Of course, 
these teams are that much poorer. 
The Knights however practice one 
to two hours a day; day in, day out, 
from September to April. That, 
basically, is the reason that North- 
western has an outstanding unit. 

Last week I watched them spend 
nearly two hours on a rain-sodden 
field practicing one move. At the 
end of the session neither their 
commander, Cadet Lt. Colonel M. 
J. Gaspard, nor they themselves 
were satified with the execution of 
the move. They'll keep doing it 
until it's perfect. 





Henry Joyner is seen taking a picture with the new ID 
card camera at registration. 

New Polaroid Camera Technique Aids 
Students In Getting ID Cards Early 



By HENRY JOYNER 

Now that the shock of regis- 
tration is over and the students 
have resolved to spend the rest 
of the semester with a picture of 
a stranger in their pocket or purse, 
it may be interesting to see how 
that three and one-half inch piece 
of horror, the ID card, was pro- 
duced. 

The new ID camera, called the 
"Avant", works on the Polaroid 
principle. The "one eyed monster" 
produces two color ID cards every 
minute. At full speed, during reg- 
istration, the audio-visual aids de- 
partment, who directs the use of 
the camera, could process almost 
600 student pictures an hour. Un- 



der the previous system it took al- 
most two weeks to have the cards 
processed. 

Northwestern has the distinction 
of being one of the first colleges 
in the country to use the new "in 
stant ID" process. In fact after our 
successful trial run the method 
is scheduled to be adopted by oth- 
er institutions. 

Perhaps the most appealing fea- 
ture of the system is that no long- 
er does a student have to wait 
two weeks to find that his ID does 
not look at all like him. Now it is 
just click, flash, and 60 seconds 
later he can ask, "Is that really 
me?" 



Paul Fritz 

Why? It can be summed up in 
one word -Pride. Not an arrogant 
pride, but pride in themselves and 
the school they represent. 

You can't help but respect these 
peopel, they do it all by themsel- 
ves. They set their standards, and 
set them high, and will not toler- 
ate anything less than success. 

Another hard-working unit based 
in the Armory is NSC's Rifle Team. 
More about them next week. 

Cadet Paul Fritz took best Cadet 
honors last week. Paul, who hails 
from New Jersey, is another of the 
Headquarters Co. juggernaught. 
Cadets from that Co. have won the 
Best Cadet honors about 75 percent 
of the time. 



c r€Surrent Sauce 

ESTABLISHED 1914 

Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks. In 
the fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
scription S3 the year payable in advance. 

Member of the Associated Collegiate Press 

Duffy Wall Editor-in-Chief 

Sharon Hillman Associate Editor 

Kenny Baker News Editor 

Jerry Brill Sports Editor 

Joy Brewton Society Editor 

John Lewis Business Manager 

Linda Broughton .... Advertising Manager 

Jon Gibson staff Artist 

Roy G. Clark Faculty Adviser 

Editorial Staff: Mary Ellen Davis, Walley 
Hebert, Carolyn Brown, Perry Angle, 
Ann Massey, and Patsy Watkins. 

Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not reflect 
the opinions of the student body or the 
administration and faculty of the coUege. 

The Current Sauce prints the news im- 
partially. It supports what it believes to 
be right, and opposes what it believes to 
be wrong, regardless. 

This paper is printed by the Graphic 
Arts Division of the Industrial Education 
Department of Northwestern. 



■a 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1965 



Fall Honor Roll Students Listed 



The names of Northwestern State College students listed on 
the honor roll for the fall semester have been released by the deans 
of the respective undergraduate schools. 

To be named to the honor roll a student must earn an over-all 
"B" or, in mathematical terms a 3.0, average in all course work 
pursued. 

Applied Arts 
and Sciences 



Allen, Bonnie C. 
Anders, Jane A. 
Arnold, Frances A. 
Austin, Jeffery D. 
Babin, Kenneth A. 
Baeder, Falba F. 
Barnes, Susan K. 
Bartlett, Jerry L. 
Beaudoin, Philip, Jr. 
Berthelot, Don J. 
Bourke, William R. 
Bradford, Jimmy L. 
Brady, Larry D. 
Brasher, Robert M. 
Brewton. Joy N. 
Brooks, Craig L. 
Brouillette, Michael E. 
Brown, Joyce Strong 
Burke, James R. 
Butler, Robin A. 
Calvert, Donald W. 
Canfield, Charles K. 
Chiu, Charles K. 
Coudon, Susan I. 
Cooley, Carl G. 
Cosumano, Joseph 
Crain, Richard C. 
Crooks, James T. 
Davis, David W. 
Derbonne, Roy K. 
Dixon, Robert P. 
Dordon, Franklin M. 
Durr, John C, Jr. 
Echols, Frank 
Efurd, Robert L. 
Elkins, Ruth E. 
Fernbaugh, Alan C. 
Fields, Ronald D. 
Fincher, William B. 
Fisher, Kenneth E. 
Fuglaar, Laurence B. 
Germany, Joe L. 
Golden, William F. 
Greene, Benjamin C. 
Harrelson, Ronald E. 
Harrington, Hoyt W. 
Harrison, Clyde F. 
Hartleroad, Joseph A. 
Herrington, Larry L. 
Hollenshead, Jack C. 
Jeane, Linda E. 
Jinkins, Sandra K. 
Johnson, Jerry R. 
Jones, Freeman M., Jr. 
Jowers, Elizabeth A. 
Keeth, Thomas G. 
Kelly, Annie V. 
Koss, John W. 
Kovar, Ann L. 
Lea, Lela Mae 
Lee, Larry D. 
Lee, Robert F. 
Lewis, John W. 
McCain, Gerald L. 
McElfresh, Wallace D. 
McRae, Ralph D. 
Maddy, James R. 
Marks, Clinton R. 
Mastracchio, Dominic 
Maxey, James F. 
Maxwell, William S. 
Medicus, Jerome M. 
Miciotto, Tim W. 
Miller, Frederick A. 
Mock, Robert D. 
Murphy, James R. 
Nelson, Marianna K. 
Newbury, Dennis K. 
Nolde, Thomas R. 
Norwood, Francis N. 
Osborne, Patrick O. 
Oxford, David B. 
Parent, Linda M. 
Peninger, James E. 
Peyton, I'aul P. 
Pinsonat, John A. 
Pope, Thomas W. 
Posey, Harry W. 
Prudhomme, Leslie 
Pyles, Donald L. 
Ragus, Charles E. 
Redditt, Richard S. 
Richardson, William N. 
Ricks, Martha S. 
Rose, Daniel A., Jr. 
Salard, Harold 
Schuetz, Kenneth L. 



Scott, Billy W. 
Sheppard, James C. 
Simmons, Billie A. 
Sistrunk, Carroll P. 
Slay, Patsy K. 
Smith, Chiquita M. 
Sorey, Eddie Sue 
Stroud, William G. 
Stuckey, Dorval W. 
Sullivan, Douglass A. 
Tabor, Carol A. 
Tatar, Thomas C. 
Tauzin, Richard G. 
Thomas, Carolyn D. 
Trichel, Douglas W. 
Turnbow, Donald C. 
Valentine, Carolyn J. 
Vanhoof, Marilyn V. 
Wall, Catherine A. 
Williams, Wesley L. 
Willis, James W. 
Wilson, Archie J. 
Wilson, Richard M. 
Womack, Clinton R. 
Wood, William L. 
Wyatt, Ronald W. 
Young, June L. 
Lincecum, Donald R. 
Loftus, Patrick J. 



Arts and Sciences 

Abney, Glenda Gail 
Alletag, Michelene 
Andries, Sharon 
Angle, Perry C. 
Armstrong, Michael 
Arnold, Betty L. 
Ayers, William 
Bailey, Daniel 
Balzrette, Carson 
Barney, Carolyn 
Bates, Glenda 
Beasley, Billy Joe 
Bell, Roy P. 
Bennett, Shelley 
Bouriaque, Edward 
Bowers, Alvin M. 
Branton, Stan E. 
Brouillette, Lynn 
Brown, Robert C. 
Brown, Thomas T. 
Butler, David Eugene 
Carter, Julia 
Chandler, George A. 
Chaplain, Anita 
Charrier, J. O. 
Coffey, Lynn M. 
Cole, Patsy Gale 
Corley, Roy H. 
Councill, Frances I. 
Crain, Wilmer O. 
Creighton, Sherry L. 
Crittenden, David B. 
Darnell, Teddy R. 
David, James P. 
Dean, Larry Wayne 
DeJean, Felix A. 
Doiron, Betty Jean 
Domingues, Charles 
Ellis, Jimmie L. 
Fisher, Charles Larry 
Foche, Franz 
Fox, Daniel 
Fraser, Warren M. 
Frye, Vernon M. 
Gary, Louise Fay 
Gaudin, John O. 
Gauthier, Linda 
Gayer, Danny James 
Gibson, Jon L. 
Giles, Douglas John 
Grisham, William O. 
Gunn, Stephen 
Hartline, Phillip 
Head, Shirley E. 
Hebert, Wallace 
Heflin, Sallie Jo 
Heine, Donald 
Holly, James L. 
Hopson, Patsy Ann 
Horton, Donald G. 
Inglis, Katharine 
James, Lelone 
Johnson, Charles W. 
Johnson, Gary Lee 
Jones, Lewis C. 
Kelly, Mary Virginia 
Kennedy. Bernnie M. 
Kirk, Harry L. 



Koll, Robert A. 
Knotts, Kenneth 
Landrem, John L. 
Landrum, Louis 
Lane, Glenda L. 
Laney, Raymond 
Lang, William Robert 
Lawson, Cheryl Ann 
Lee, David A. 
Levee, Thellie Rhea 
Lewis, Joseph Thomas 
Lewis, Sharon Idella 
Lindsey, Carolyn Kay 
Lucero, Sam Jude 
Manning, Earl L. 
Martin, Jerry A. 
Masson, Samuel A. 
Maynard, Suzanne 
Meachum, Zackey 
Miller, Betty Kaye 
Miller, Katherine 
Mims, Thomas J. 
Mobley, Harry James 
Nance, James L. 
Neal, Mary Lou 
Nelson, Ambros Wales 
Nielsen, Andrea Lea 
Normand, Mary Ann 
O'Quinn, James H. 
Ownes, 0. Kay 
Pace, Susan Diane 
Page, Lois Marie 
Parker, Patricia 
Parks, Carolyn Ruth 
Peninger, Fred D. 
Phelps, Meade H. 
Piatt, Geraldine Lee 
Powell, Ronald Lynn 
Prudhomme, Sherry 
Raburn, Hodge M. 
Radford, Wanda 
Ramsey, John R. 
Randall, James W. 
Ray, Loyce E. 
Riggs, Paul M. 
Robicheaux, Ray T. 
Roshto, James A. 
Ross, Daniel E. 
Rossi, Virginia F. 
Rowzee, G. R. 
Rushing, Murray 
Russell, Susan I,. 
Sanders, Dana Roy 
Sava, David G. 
Schettler, Heinrich 
Senn, Garvin D. 
Sherman, Eddy W. 
Sherman, J. Rahn 
Shipp, Randall Allen 
Smith, Patricia Lynn 
Smith, Richard B. 
Speir, Jackie R. 
Stephens, Sandra D. 
Stevens, Sandra Jo 
Thompson, Linda Rae 
Thompson, Michael 
Tisdale, Judith Ann 
Toms, Billy Roy 
Toups, Beverly Ann 
Tousek, Helen C. 
Trundle, Frances V. 
Urankar, John M. 
Van Dyke, Anthony 
Varnado, Michele 
Vines, Patricia 
Walker, Joseph 
Ward, Warren W. 
Whitehead, Thomas 
Whitworth, Charles 
Wise, Jo Ann 
Woodyard, John 
Young, Michael W. 



Education 

Ackerman, Sandra 
Albritton, Herman L. 
Allen, Anne Campbell 
Alphin, Rebecca D. 
Andries, Mary Beth 
Ash, Ben 

Austin, Charles Glenn 
Babin, Priscilla Jane 
Bailey, Sandra Sue 
Baker, Marietta 
Baldwin, Shirley Ann 
Bales, Patricia Anne 
Barr, James W. 
Barrett, Cheryl Bass 
Barry, Valda Leigh 
Barton, Mary Kathleen 



Barton, Sharon Gayle 
Bates, Grover Lamar 
Beach, Douglas G. 
Beasley, Donald 
Bedard, David L. 
Bedsole, Martha Rae 
Behm, Jeannie R. 
Belgard, Yvonne M. 
Bellue, Carolyn Ann 
Bennett, Karen Jean 
Berlitz, ' Sharon Dale 
Berry, Jimmy Dale 
Bethany, Sandra S. 
Bigelow, Shirley Jean 
Blackburn, Suzanne 
Blair, Georgia Ann 
Blanchard, Mary Anne 
Bland, Judy Lee 
Bloch, Ann K. 
Bonnette, Charlotte 
Bostick, George Ellis 
Boswell, Cecil Elvis 
Braden, Diannie A. 
Bradford, Bonnie J. 
Bradley, Mary Ruth 
Brandon, Carolyn C. 
Breedlove, Charlotte 
Brewer, Carolyn E. 
Brooks, Mary Celeste 
Broussard, Charlotte 
Broussard, Marilyn C. 
Brown, Jan Ann 
Browning, Christine 
Brupbacher, Sandra 
Bryan, Edgar W. 
Bryan, Julia Adele 
Bryant, Melody Ruth 
Burlile, Nina C. 
Burns, Edward H. 
Burrow, Delores Gail 
Bush, Sandra Marilyn 
Calaway, Nancy Lynn 
Campbell, Betty 
Canerday, Ronald D. 
Carpenter, Polly Anne 
Carroll, Frances Ann 
Carroll, Martha Lou 
Carter, Mary A. Taylor 
Castille, Patricia A. 
Cavanaugh, Henrietta 
Chance, Julia Sue 
Chaney, Deirdre Lynne 
Choate, Martha Ann 
Clark, Sandra T. 
Clausen, Jule M. 
Clayton, Nancy Kay 
Clemens, Theresa Ann 
Cline, Mikel Thomas 
Cloud, Janice Marie 
Coco, Mary C. 
Coker, Carolyn Jane 
Cole, Wiley Charles 
Colquette, Barbara P. 
Colvin, Grover C. 
Combs, Sharon 
Cook, Catherine E. 
Cook, Neva Lynell 
Cooper Donna Ruth 
Corbell, I. Lynne 
Cox, Douglas Eugene 
Creed, Thomas D. 
Crenshaw, Carrie D. 
Cress, Charlanne C. 
Crew, Robert G. 
Crochet, Suzanne 
Culp, Sheila Mae 
Curtis, M. Virginia 
Daigle, John Ronald 
Dark, Beverly A. 
Dark, Don F. Jr. 
Daughtry, Linda Ann 
Dauzat, Jo Ann 
David, Sandra D. 
Davis, Anne Marie 
Davis, Evelyn Joyce 
Davis, Inetha L. 
Dawson, Marcia 
Dean, Thomas O., Jr. 
DeBusk, Harry Lee 
DeBusk, Sandra Lee 
Deggs, Peggy Ruth 
DeKeyzer, Margaret 
Derbonne, Sharon L. 
DeSoto, Mary Jane 
Dew, Betty S. 
DeWitt, Betty Sue 
Dickson, Carmie Sue 
Dickson, Felton 
Dix, Gracie L. 
Dobbins, Rita Ellen 
Doherty, Kathleen L. 
Dollar, Dorothy Wiley 
Dousay, John Wayne 
Dow, Mary Frances 
Dozier, Treba Gay 
Dranguet, Mary 
Duggan, Betty C. 
Duggan, Kathi Shivers 
Duggan, Max C. 
Dunn, Sara Dianne 
Durr, Glenda F. 
Ellis, Jeffrey L. 



Ellis, William E. 
Everett, Carolyn 
Faber, Ingrid Monica 
Faith, William R. 
Faraldo, Dana L. 
Farley, Nona R. 
Fenton, Carol Dianne 
Ferlito, Antoinette 
Festervand, Sandra 
Fioreia, Frances Ann 
Flurry, Barbara C. 
Fontenot, Derla Ann 
Fowler, Jerry Wayne 
Fowler, Leonard Ted 
Francis, Mary Ellen 
Frazier, F. Yvonne 
Fulton, Pamela S. 
Gahagan, Martha J. 
Galloway, J. W. 
Gamble, Carolyn Sue 
Gamble, Frances H. 
Gary, Marie Evelyn 
Gaskin, Sue Ellen 
Gaspard, Patricia Kate 
Gephardt, Nancy Lee 
Giering, Katherine L. 
Giglio, Sandra A. 
Glass, Cherry Lizabeth 
Grantham, Mary Lee 
Gray, Farleigh M. Jr. 
Greene, Nelda Anne 
Grigsby, Elizabeth 
Grodjinovsky, Amos 
Grunwald, Sarah Faye 
Guay, Martha W. 
Ham, Helen Elizabeth 
Hargis, Jo Ellen 
Harris, Ernestine M. 
Hart, Lucille 
Hartwell, Patricia Mae 
Hataway, Melva J. 
Hatfield, Shirley Ann 
Hayden, Mary 
Hays, Sheryl L. 
Haynie, Linda Dean 
Hayward, Lottie Mae 
Henderson, Maribeth 
Hernandez, Malcolm 
Higle, Herberta M. 
Hill, Mira Lee 
Hillman, Diana Dale 
Hillman, Sharon 
Himes, Vivian Elaine 
Hodges, Jackie Sue 
Hodges, Virginia 
Hoffpauir, Penny 
Hoffstadt, Ruth-Anne 
Holley, Patsy J. 
Honeycutt, Katherine 
Horn, Martha Jean 
Horton, Mary Ann 
Howell, Vera Lea 
Hudnall, Nellie I. 
Hudson, Barbara 
Hunt, Dorothy Ann 
Hyams, Denis 
Ingram, Sherry S. 
Ivy, Carolyn S. 
Jackson, Linda Gayle 
Johnson, Gary A. 
Johnson, Lynda Kay 
Jones, Betty Ruth 
Jones, James Robert 
Jones, M. Carol 
Jordan, Donnie 
Joyce, Murraye D. Jr. 
Joyner, Henry Hugh 
Kasmiersky, Erma K. 
Keith, Donna Jeanne 
Kelly, Margie E. 
Ketchum, Connie Sue 
Knippers, Benny R. 
Knotts, Betty Jean 
LaFleur, M. Elaine 
LaGrone, Jackie Lynn 
Latura, Patricia Ann 
Ledford, Harold Joe 
Lee, Elizabeth A. 
Lee, Gail Britton 
Lilly, Bettye Marye 
Lilley, Lena Maye 
Lisenbea, Andrea 
Lowe, Mary Frances 
Lucas, Carolyn Ann 
Lucky, Jere Lynn 
McCann. John B. 
McCardle Don Henry 
McCollum, Marsha L. 
McCormick, Kathryn 
McDonald, Linda Mona 
McDonald, Tony L 
McDowell, Marcus L. 
McDowell. Thomas 
McFarlane, Mildred S. 
McGee, Carroline S. 
McGee Mary Beth 
McLain, Helen Anne 
McLain, Judith L. 
McLamore, Jackie L. 
McMillan. Sandra Kay 
Maddox, Gene N. 
Maddox, Maudette 



Manning, Lenora R. 
Marcantel, Calbert 
Marler, Jeanie F. 
Marshall, Rosemary 
Martin, Alice Faye 
Martin, Barbara Lou 
Marx, Joanne Gail 
Mathews, Bonnie Jean 
Maxwell, Amy L. 
Mayfield, Henry L. 
Mayor, Marjorie M. 
Melder, Mary Francis 
Methvin, Sandra Kay 
Meyers, Carol Jean 
Meyerstons, Margaret 
Miller, Harris C. 
Miller, Paul P. 
Mitchell, Dale C. 
Mitchell, Patricia 
Mixon, Helen Marie 
Mobley, Ruby Nell 
Monk, Glenda Rose 
Moore, Joyce M. 
Morgan, Wanda G. 
Mosely, Dana Taylor 
Mott, Janet Kay 
Mullins, Nancy Dees 
Murphy, Willis Bailey 
Nadrchal, Linda Jean 
Napier, Carolyn J. 
Neville, Cheryl I. 
Newsome, Helen C. 
Nickerson, F. Dianne 
Nolan, Patty L. 
Noone, Emeric T. 
Norris, Mary Louise 
Nugent, Lawrence 
Odom, Brenda Joy 
Oglesby, Carolyn W. 
Oglesby, Dale H. 
Owen, William L. 
Patterson, Sandra K. 
Patton, N. Elease 
Paul, Carla Ruth 
Pearson, Barbara N. 
Pepperman, Pamela F. 
Perdue, Larry 
Petterson, Gweneth L. 
Phillips, Marsha L. 
Piper, Gary B. 
Pittman, Deeann Marie 
Prewitt, Ursula 
Prudhomme, Ellen M. 
Pyle, Fannie Laura 
Pyle, Frankie P. 
Rachal, Barbara Ann 
Randolph, Beverly 
Reed, L. Carolyn 
Reese, Linda Susan 
Reynolds, Ramona B. 
Rhodes, Oliva Anne 
Richarson, Barbara 
Richarson, Lloyd I. 
Risley, Ginger R. 
Roach, Edwena 
Robichaux, Linda M. 
Rodes, Monty 
Rodgers, Donna 
Rolland, Sandra Gail 
Royer, Sandra J. 
Rushing, Pamela J. 
Salter, Jeanne Bell 
Salter, Joe Reece 
Sanders, Ronald G. 
Sandifer, Virginia S. 
Savage, Juanell 
Scarborough, Glennie 
Schoenberg, Jade 
Scruggs, James E. 
Sellers, Mary Beth 
Sers, Martha Rose 
Sharbono, Neva M. 
Shaub, Carolyn Lee 
Shaw, Ann Wilson 
Short, Sherryl Ann 
Slack, Marilyn 
Slade, John Lester 
Smith, Charlene Rene 
Smith, Charlotte H. 
Smith, Dorothy Ann 
Smith, Linda JoAnn 
Stafford, Sally Ann 
Standard, Barbara G. 
Steen, Elsie Ruth 
Stevens, Ronald Ray 
Stewart, Gary T. 
Stiles, Judy Ann 
Stiles, Mary Annell 
Stone, Carol, Frances 
Stratton, Dewanna 
Strayhan, Clark M. 
Swenson, Sandra Dee 
Talbert, Linda Nell 
Tauzin, Barbara Ann 
Taylor, Rebecca Jean 
Terry, Judy Arleen 
Theriot, Mary W. 
Thomas, Jimmie 
Thompson, Nelda R. 
Thompson, William R. 
Todd, Patricia Gail 
Toler, Frances Allen 
Tonglet, William M. 



Townson, Linda Marie 
Trapp, Milton Reid 
Turner, Glenda M. 
Tyler, Virginia Gail 
Ulmer, Dorothy Staggs 
Valentine, Jonny D. 
Varner, Connie Lynn 
Vercher, Susie Lynn 
Vines, Ramona Beth 
Wagley, Carol Ann 
Walker,Jean Vance 
Watkins, C. Katy 
Watkins, Melinda J. 
Watson, Adrienne J. 
Webb, Randall Joseph 
Weldon, Mary J. 
Wells, Frances Ann 
Werner, Harvey Dale 
Wescott, Roberta P. 
West, Bobby R. 
White, Karl Denson 
Whitehead, Emily F. 
Whitlock, Sandra 
Williams, Crawford A. 
Williams, David B. 
Williams, Mardel Rita 
Williams, Ross Gordon 
Willis, Donnie Ray 
Willis, Wayne W. 
Wolf, Richard 
Womack, Jack Lamar 
Wood, Donald Wayne 
Wright, YaDnnnie Love 
Yarbrough, Margaret 
Young, Judith Elaine 

Nursing 

Adkins, Sue 
Alessi, Ginger 
Anderson, Brenda 
Bamber, Sherry Ann 
Bankston, Faye 
Benjamin, Elizabeth 
Barley, Lola Ann 
Brittingham, Bobbie 
Brode, Emme Sue 
Buisson, Carol 
Caldwell, Mattie 
Carter, Sandra 
Chandler, Sara 
Chappell, Carol 
Cole, Mary Catherine 
Cook, Thomas 
Cooper, Sally- 
Davis, Colleen W. 
DuCote, Janet 
Ellzey, Sandra 
Emmons, Martha 
Ensminger, Tommye 
Erickson, Donna 
Evans, Sandra 
Farrington, Carolyn 
Forshag, Susan 
Foster, Kathleen 
Gaddis, Kathy 
Gibson, Maureen 
Griffith, Jesserene 
Grob, Patricia 
Haley, Barbara 
Harper, Mary T. 
Hebert, Georgia 
Hubbs, Rosemary 
Hyde, Barbara 
Irwin, Hazel L. 
Johnson, Luisa 
King, Katherine 
LaCaze, Julie 
McDonald, Anita 
McElveen, Frances 
Malley, Linda 
Malone, Janet 
Martina, Marie 
Medlin, Marylou 
Miller, Marjorie 
Mills, Sarah 
Mills, Yolanda 
Muench, Louellyn 
Porter, Patricia 
Prestridge, Carmen 
Pullman, Lucille 
Robinson, Leona 
Rolling, Arleen 
Sandefer, Alexandra 
Sembach, Elizabeth 
Sexton, Linda 
Shaffer, Shirley 
Shirley, Linda 
Shows, Mabel 
Smith, Sylvia 
Spillman, Myrna 
Starns, Diann 
Stone, Dorothy 
Thigpen, Patricia 
Tousek, Linda 
Turner, Dedra Diane 
Van Neste, Jennet 
White, Sharon Baker 
Wilder, Sharley Jo 
Williams, Hazel 
Williamson, Mary Beth 
Woods, Sharon 
Wright, Corinne 



T 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1965 




<4u|f jlf |!L «iy 





One of the outstanding players on 
the Demon basketball team this 
year has been David Clark. David 
has averaged 21.9 points per game 
in GSC competition and has an 
average of 17.7 in overall compe- 
tition. 



Demons Toppled 
In Last Home Game 

The Northwestern Demons fin- 
ished out their home slate Tues- 
day night with a close 76-72 loss to 
the Northeast State Indians. The 
Indians from Monroe clinched the 
Gulf States Conference title with 
an 8-1 record as the McNeese Cow- 
boys downed their closest rivals, 
Southeastern, 5-3 for the season. 

The Demons are now 1-7 in con- 
ference play and 9-14 overall. The 
only conference win for the De- 
mons was Saturday night's decis- 
ion over the McNeese Cowboys. 
NSC will close out their season 
with three road games against 
Louisiana Tech, Southwestern, and 
Louisiana College. 

An estimated crowd of 1000 wit- 
nessed the tight contest as the 
lead changed hands several times 
before the Indians were able to pull 
away. NSC led going into the sec- 
ond half with a narrow 40-39 mar- 
gin. 

David Clark continued to pace 
the Demon scoring as he led all 
scorers with 21 points followed 
closely by Sam Watts with 18 point 
and 12 rebounds. Others to score 
for NSC were Kenny Arthur with 
11, Lester Lee with 10, Billy Ray 
with eight and newcomer Frank 
Bamer with four points. Freshman 
guard Glen Saulters led Northeast 
with 18. 

In a game preceding the GSC 
affair, Northeast's freshman team 
defeated Fisher's 84-62. 



Patronize 
Our 
Advertisers 



WESLEY 
Foundation 

SUNDAY 

9:00 A.M.— Coffee 
9:30 A.M.— Forum 
6:00 P.M.— Bible Study 

WEDNESDAY 

5:00 P.M.— Supper 
5:45 P.M. — Program & Wor- 
ship 

FRIDAY 

7:30 A.M.— Morning Vespers 

OFFICE HOURS 

10:00 AM.— 12 Noon 
1:00 P.M.— 2:30 P.M. 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 5 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 




l ^££M6 UK5 £V££Y YEAR. W£ HAVE TO VlACe MOfZB Of OUSZ 
£ NT£(ZlM<a RZS^HMgN/ INTO LOWEfc ISVBL. &MgPIAl,aA5$& l 



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New Shades available in: 
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Wedge-Tipped Fine Line Lipstick 
Nail Satin 

See these and other fine cosmetic values in 
our FULL LINE OF MAX FACTOR Cosmetics 



McCLUNG DRUG CO. 

Serving Natchitoches and NSC Since 1891 
Corner Front & Church Sts. Phone 2461 

FREE DELIVERY TO ALL COLLEGE DORMS 



PEN NYLAND 

1300 Washington Across From Peoples Motor Co. 

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 
8 A.M. - 1 A.M. 

16 HOURS PER DAY 

Free Transportation To And From 
The College - 8 A.M. - 11 P.M. 

NINE POOL TABLES 
(Brunswick, Gold Crown) 

TWO SNOOKER TABLES 

(Brunswick, Gold Crown) 



ALL TYPES OF PINBALL MACHINES 
RIFLE AND GUN GALLERY 
FRESH POPPED POPCORN — JUKE BOX 



SNACK BAR -AIR CONDITIONED 

See Our New Dollar Change Maker 

ENTERTAINMENT FOR ALL 
MEN - LADIES - CHILDREN 

There is no charge for 
Ladies with boy escort 

For Fun - Relaxation - Pleasure 
Visit PENNYLAND 




Planning A Wedding ? ? 

There are millions of details and there never seems to be 
enough time. But, we have the solution to one of your problems 
and that is, wedding photographs. Yes, we will take care of all 
your picture problems from the engagement through the tin 
cans and rice. We travel too; anywhere — 

Include in your planning a stop at Guillet Photography. We 
carry in stock a complete line of wedding books and our prices 
are set up to cover the most elaborate wedding down to an 
elopement. We will fit the photography to your budget. 

You can have color or black & white and for quality, you cannot 
find better. Many of the Guillet Photography wedding photo- 
graphs have been prize winners and yours could be the next 
prize winner. 



John C Guillet 



Photography 

403 Second Street 
Telephone 2381 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1965 



Who Wants College Grads? 



Editor's Note — The following art- 
icle is the first in a series that 
will be run this semester to pro- 
vide information that might be 
helpful in securing jobs. It is 
aimed primarily at women stu- 
dents, but is applicable for men 
also. This information is provided 
by Career Blazers Agency. 

Everybody, of course. We are 
not being facetious. Every field, 
whether it is pubilshing, insurance, 
advertising and public relations, 
televsion, theatre and radio, mar- 
ket research, foundations, social 
services and industry has need at 
one time or another for a young 
woman with a college education. 
Then why the lament — "Nobody 
needs us." 

We hear it daily, and in Janu- 
ary, June and September, we hear 
it nearly every minute of the day. 
The unfortunate truth is that the 
Bachelor's alone is not quite e- 
nough for the specifications of 
ninety-nine percent of the jobs. 

The problem lies in the struc- 
ture of business. But until the 
needs of business change, the pro- 
blem will remain. There are only a 
limited number of jobs available 
to the colege grad that do not re- 
quire office skills. Actually, asking 
that a college grad be able to type 
a letter is not really a strange re- 
quest. When a young person pre- 



pares for teaching, she learns a 
special skill, for social work, an- 
other skill, for art, another, and 
so on. Why then, should she feel 
that she can enter the business 
world with no prepared skill to 
meet its demands? 

The fields most interested in and 
interesting to college grads are the 
communications fields. Imagine 
trying to communicate without the 
written word! Visualize further, at- 
tempting to run a business without 
the ubiquitous typewriter! 

In our first article we mentioned 
some small but special skills that 
were important for the job hunter. 
Fortunately, one of these skills is 
the easily acquired typing facility. 
Most of you know how to type al- 
ready, and all you will have to 
do is practice enough to build up 
our speed and accuracy. Another 
important "special" is to have 
some knowledge of what to expect 
in the various fields. The following 
articles will cover the various 
fields that are particularly suitable 
for the liberal arts graduate. 



A Prescription 

(ACP)— THE CHINOOK, Casper 
College, Casper, Wyo., observes 
that of all the remedies that won't 
cure a cold, whiskey is the most 
popular. 



Governor Appoints 
Faculty Member 
To Commission 

Faculty member appointed 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
at Northwestern and Director of 
the NSC Pineville Campus, Mrs. 
Grace R. Riley, has been appointed 
to the Governor's Commission on 
the Status of Women. 

The Commission is in conjunc- 
tion with a federal organization 
the President's Commission on the 
Status of Women, organized in 
December, 1961. Purpose of the 
commission is to review progress 
and make recommendations for 
constructive action to overcome 
discrimination in government and 
private employment on the basis 
of sex. 

Mrs. Riley has been a member 
of the Northwestern nursing fac 
ulty since 1956. She received her 
nursing diploma from Frankford 
Hospital School of Nursing, a bac- 
helor's degree in nursing educa- 
tion, C. P. H., from University of 
Pennsylvania, and a Master's de 
gree from Florida State Univer- 
sity. Mrs. Riley has also done post 
graduate work at the University of 
Washington. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
SERVICES 
Old Lemee House 
Jefferson St. 
Every Sunday 11:00 A.M. 
All are welcome 



For The Best 
Food In Town 

Stop In 

At The 

WADDLE 'N 
GRILL 

Phone 4949 
HIGHWAY 1 SOUTH 



Student Council 
Minutes 

(Continued from page 3) 

trash on the campus. Therefore, 
maintneance people have to be 
hired to clean up this trash. Dean 
Fulton said that even though such 
people were hired that this fact 
did not give students the right to 
litter the campus. Parking is an- 
other problem. Lots cannot be 
provided so that each student can 
take his car to class. 

There is also stealing going on 
in the dining halls. This stealing is 
in the form of letting others use 
yonr I.D. when you do not eat in 
the cafeteria. Many students feel 
that they have paid for the meal 
anyway, but this is not true be- 
cause the price they pay is based 
on an assumption that they would 
not eat there part of the time. 
Dean Fulton raised the question 
as to what we can do about these 
problems. A discussion by Council 
members followed. 

There being no further business, 
Pat Holley moved that the meeting 
be adjourned. Second by Doug 
Giles. Meeting adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Carolyn Thomas, Secretary 



Annual Music Festival Being Held 
On Campus This Week, 500 To Attend 



Approximately 700 entries have 
been received for the three-day 
District II Solo and Small En- 
semble Music Festival to be held 
at Northwestern, beginning Thurs- 
day, Feb. 25, according to Dr. 
Joseph B. Carlucci, head of the 
music department and festival 
chairman. 

The annual program, which is 
sponsored by the Louisiana Music- 
Educators Association, will at- 



Woodman Spare That . . . 

(ACP)— THE MINNESOTA 
DAILY, University of Minnesota. 
Minneapolis, notes that the grass 
area on campus is gradually re- 
treating. The asphalt and cement 
syndrome is gradually eating up 
the ground. We are not convinced 
it is all necessary. 

The campus doesn't really need 
asphalt hilling by the stair ways 
on the mall, or tarred patches of 
earch with bike racks. 

Why not use the rule of the 
foresters? "Let every tree that is 
cut down be replaced." And, we 
might add, let every uprooted 
patch of grass have its own just- 
ification. 



tract some 1,000 participants from 
approximately 35 elementary, 
junior and senior high schools in 
13 parishes. Activities wijl get 
under way on Thursday with vo- 
cal solos and ensembles. Feb. 26 
and 27 will be devoted to Piano 
and Instrumental isolos aiid en- 
sembles, with Twirling events in- 
cluded on the last day. 

Each entrant will be judged, 
rated and helpfully criticized. 
Those receiving Superior ratings 
will be awarded medals. The jud- 
ges will be Mr. Loren Davidson, 
LSU School of Music, and Dr. Gor- 
don Flood, NSC Alusic Dep/art- 
ment, vocal; Mr. Ken Green, Step- 
hen F. Austin College, and Mr. 
R. B. Watson, Pine Bluff, Ark. 
High School, instrumental; Mr. 
and Mrs. Ronald Stetzel, South- 
eastern La. College, piano; and 
Miss Margaret Martin, NSC fea- 
ture twirler from Winnfield, twirl- 
ing. 

Natchitoches Parish schools and 
private teachers submitting en- 
tries are: Campti High School, 
Fairview-Alpha High School, Nat- 
chitoches High School, Mrs. Julia 
Davis, Mrs. Edward Horton, Mrs. 
Walter Robinson, and Dr. Paul 
Torgrimson. 



I didn't think Charlie was that kind of guy... 







That car 








he's driving 








tonight... 




He's 


Yes. 


bucket seats, 




always been 


1 know. 


carpeting, 


Frankly, 1 


sort of a, 


Wide ties, 


console, 


don't think 


well, 


wide lapels 


vinyl trim, 


he can 


you know what. 


and all. 


big V8. 


afford it. 



Yes, 

who does he think 
he's going 
to impress? 




Hi, 

Charlie. 




It's Dodge Coronet. And frankly, Charlie can afford it. So can you. Coronet. The hot new Dodge at a new lower price. 



Coronet 500 sports the following as standard equipment: all-vinyl interior, front bucket seats, full carpeting, 
padded dash, directional signals, backup lights, deluxe wheel covers, center console, 273 cubic inch V8. 



'BS Dodge Coronet 



DODGE DIVISION CHRYSLER 

MOTORS CO'lr*CRft?lO.» 



See all the new Dodges on display at your nearby Dodge Dealer's. 



■WATCH "THE BOB HOPE SHOW," NBC-TV. CHECK YOUR LOCAL LISTING. 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1965 





NSC Stage Band 
To Give Concert 

Northwestern's stage band. Dix- 
ieland Band, jazz quintet, and vo- 
calists will present a concert, Mar. 
1 at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts audi- 
torium. 

The group, under the direction 
of Edward Tarratus, will play se- 
lections from the "swing era", 
modern big band pieces, Dixieland 
jazz, motion picture themes, Henry 
Mancini compositions, and vocal 
numbers. Students will be admit- 
ted free. 

Last year's performance, one of 
the big hits of the year, promises 
to repeat as a musical highlight. 
Unlike last year, the concert will 
be folowed by a tour of the group 
to five high schools; Haughton, 
North Caddo, Springhill, Homer, 
and Airline. 



Rehearsing for the annual Spring Concert which will be held Tuesday night at eight in 
the Northwestern Fine Arts Auditorium are the fifteen members of the Stage Band. Dr. 
Edward Tarratus, assistant professor of music, will direct the performance. One of the 
most popular events of the past year, the Stage Band Concert promises to be one of the 
hits of the Spring semester. There will be no admission charge. 



Dr. Richard Garth 
Gets NSF Grant 

The National Science Founda- 
tion has awarded a grant amount- 
ing to $4,280 supporting a NSF 
Research Participation Program 
for High School Teachers during 
the coming summer session at 
Northwestern, to Dr. Richard E. 
Garth, associate professor of biol- 
ogy at NSC. 

Awarded in the area of physiol- 
ogy, the graiit will provide stipends 
for two high school biology teach- 
ers to participate in a research pro- 
ject already underway at North- 
western. The project is concerned 
with the physiology of male quail 
and has been in progress for the 
past three years under support of 
the National Institutes of Health. 

According to Dr. Garth, the ma- 
jor objectives of the program are 
to provide participants the oppor- 
tunity of learning methods in 
research and the use of labor- 
atory techniques and instruments. 
Through research experience the 
teachers will develop confidence 
and competence in teaching. 

Participants selected for the 
nine-week program will receive a 



Vocabulary Course Is Being Offered 



Mr. Kenneth Hackney, assistant 
professor of psychology, is opening 
a workshop for advance training 
in vocabulary development. The 
purpose of the course is to develop 
a clear understanding of words. 



weekly stipend of $75, plus an 
allowance of $15 per week for up 
to four dependents. A travel allow- 
ance will also be provided. 

Deadline for submitting appli- 
cation forms to Dr. Garth is March 
1. Selection will be made follow- 
ing review of college transripts 
and background, review of achieve- 
ments, appraisal of interest in re- 
search, and recommendations of 
principals and supervisors. 



The workshop will be held: 2:30 
to 4:30 Monday and Friday; 8 to 
10 Tuesday and Thursday; and 
2:30 to 4:30 Tuesday and Thursday. 
All interested persons are to re- 
port to Mr. Hackney's office in 
Room 324 Warren Easton Hall. 
Only students who are willing to 
work hard should request aid. 



Patronize 
Our 
Advertisers 



Natchitoches 
Laundromat 

936 College Avenue 

CONVENIENT TO 
ALL STUDENT? 

Open 24 hours a day 
7 days a week 




For Good 
Hair Coloring 
Shaping 
Styling 

«isit 

TRESSIES 
Beauty Salon 

in 

East Natchitoches 
Call 4536 

Closed Mondays 
See 

Tressie - Elsie - Irma 
Jean - Linda 

201 EAST Third Street 
Across from Warrens Mkt. 



NEW SERVICE AVAILABLE 

Quick service drycleaning and shirt laundering is 
now offered at Community Cleaners & Shirt Laundry 
located at 103 Second Street. 

Drycleaning in by 10 A. M. may be picked up by 
5 P. M. the same day Monday - Saturday with pressing 
while you wait. 

Shirts in one day to include Friday may be picked 
up by 5 P. M. the following day. 

COMMUNITY CLEANERS AND 
SHIRT LAUNDRY 



Phone 2229 



103 Second St. 



Voice Of Northwestern 

The Voice of Northwestern, bet- 
ter known as V. O. N., is being 
broadcast over KNOC radio every 
Friday evening at 6:45. This fif- 
teen minute program is sponsored 
by the NSC Radio Club and is 
concerned with current activities 
occurring on campus. The program 
includes a topic of special interest 
each week. 



Campus Radio Club 
Elects Officers 

The Natchitoches Amateur Ra- 
dio Club met Thursday night in 
the Electronics Laboratory of the 
Industrial Arts Building at North- 
western State College. Mr. Bob 
Wright, who presided over the 
meeting, discussed the future act- 
ivities of the club. 

Officers elected at this initial 
meeting are Walter Weffenstette, 
president: Bob Wright, vice-presi- 
dent; Kenneth Hackney, secretary; 
and T. J. McCain, treasuer. 

It was decided by the members 
of the group that the club would 
meet in the Industrial Arts Build- 
ing every second Thursday of each 
month at 7:30 p.m. 

Club activities will involve such 
things as code training for anyone 
desiring to pass the FCC examina- 
tions for an amateur radio license, 
as well as lessons in radio theory. 
It was suggested that citizen band 
operators be invited to join the 
group and participate in its acti- 
vities. It was also suggested that 
lessons be given to interested ama- 
teurs in trouble shooting their own 
equipment whenever it would not 
operate properly. 

Any interested student is invited 
to join the club, the only require- 
ment for membership being an in- 
terest in amateur radio. 



[CLASSICAL JAZZ POPULAR 

BACK TO SCHOOL 

RECORD SALE 
.Baker's Town and Campus Bookstore 

Feb. 12 thru Feb. 26 

Your Favorite Artists On These Labels 
CAPITOL — MERCURY — MGM — DOT — RCA 
UNITED ARTISTS — VERVE 

Ferrante & Teicher * Kingston Trio * George Shearing 

| * Billy Vaughn * Josh White • Leslie Gore 

I * James Brown . * Cannonball Adderley * Thelonius Monk 

* Charlie Byrd I* Four Preps * Clebanoff 

SAVE $2 or $3 on Every Album 

| Former List $3.98 and $4.98 Reduced To $1.98 

> Former List $4.98 and $5.98 Reduced To $2.98 

I 

"NSC's Favorite Bookstore" 



Newest FABERGE masterpiece . . . 
BRUT for men — after shower, shave, 
anything. Bold, brash, new men's lo- 
tion that lingers long on a slightly un- 
civilized, definitely unsettled note — 
Bound to be the most treasured gift 
of the year for the most masculine 
man you know! 

Stunning gift boxed in handsome 
silver-flashed bottle green decanters. 
$5.00, $8.50, $10.00 



EATON'S STATIONERY 
For reasonable priced stationery from 
$1 on up come to us, the exclusive 
dealer of Natchitoches. 

The stationery comes in many as- 
sorted styles, colors and some scented. 
You will find them in the convenient 
portfolio or the beautiful decorated 
boxes. 



Two Stores To Serve You 
DeBUEUX'S PHARMACY NEW DRUG STORE 



BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 
PHONE 4582 



SECOND AND ST. DENIS 
PHONE 2386 



Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1965 



1 ST ANNUAL GRADUATE "N" CLUB 

INDOOR TRACK MEET 
Prather Coliseum 

NORTHWESTERN STATE COLLEGE 

Natchitoches, Louisiana 
February 26 -High School - 7 P.M. 
February 27 Colleges 7 P.M. 
EVENTS 

60 Yd. Dash- 60 Yd. High Hurdles -65 Yd. Low 
Hurdles • 440 Yd. Dash - 880 Yd. Run ■ Mile Run • 2 
Mile Run -4 Lap Relay Mile Relay - Pole Vault 
High Jump - Broad Jump - Shot Put 

ADMISSION 
Adults - $1 .50 Advance - $1 .00 
Students - .75 - Advance - .50 




Demons End Seven Game Losing Streak 
In Beating McNeese Cowboys 76-62 



The Northwestern State College 
Demons stopped a double losing 
streak as they downed the Cow- 
boys of McNeese by a score of 
76-62. The win was the Demons' 
first in seven outings and also 
their first GSC victory. 

The win brought the Demons' 



Demon Gymnasts 
Place Second In 
Meet With LSU 

Northwestern gymnasts, playing 
host to the Louisiana State College 
gymnast team, dropped a 73V 2 - 
62% verdict to the Tigers from 
Baton Rouge. LSU was led by 
Jerry George of New Orleans. 

George scored a total of 54.2 
points on the horizontal bar. He 
also placed second in the floor 
exercises and the still rings. 
Following him for a close second 
was Northwestern's Richard Lloyd. 
Lloyd placed first in the floor 
exercises and also on the parallel 
bars. He finished with a total of 
51.0 points. 

The top three finishers in the 
eight events were: Floor exercises, 
Lloyd, NSC; George, LSU; and 
Tom Donovan, LSU. Vaulting 
horse, George, LSU; Donovan, 
LSU; and Harry Shutt, NSC. 

Still Rings, Don Willis, NSC; 
George, LSU; and Donovan, LSU. 
Pommeled Horse, George, LSU; 
Lloyd, NSC; and Larry Stark, NSC. 
Parallel Bars, Lloyd, NSC; Don- 
ovan, LSU; and Robert Jansing, 
LSU. 

Horizontal Bars, George, LSU; 
Tom Boone, NSC; and Lloyd, NSC. 
Tumbling, Dave Bedard, NSC; 
Fortier, LSU; Lloyd, NSC. 

The Demons next meet is Fri- 
day as they travel to Monroe to 
battle the Northeast Indians. 



Demon guard Lester Lee, 12, drives up the middle to the 
basket as big Sam Watts, 42, blocks out opponent. NSC 
rolled over McNeese Cowboys 76-62 in this GSC contest 
Saturday night for their lone conference win. The Demons 
now stand 1-7 in conference action and 9-14 overall. 



NSC Tennis Team 
Starts Practicing 

The Northwestern State College 
tennis team takes to the courts 
this week as prepare for their 
spring slate. This years team is 
comprised of four juniors, all of 
which have received two letters, 
returning are Lloyd Wallace, Dan- 
ny Walker, Larry Fisher, and Jim 
Dowden. The fifth team spot is 
open. 

The number one and two spots 



for the team are held by Wallace 
and Walker. Last year Wallace 
was out but in 1962-63, he was 
runner up in the conference at 
number one singles. Walker was 
runner up in 1964 and won the 
number two singles in 1963. 
Walker has lost only two matches 
in two years. Both of them came in 
last years action as he played in 
the number one spot. His overall 
record is 20-2. Wallace has lost 
only five matches and his record 
now stands at 19-5. 

Coach for the team is Huey 
Cranford. 



Intramural Schedule 1964-65 



Gymnastics 

Badminton 

Paddleball 

Basketball 

Free Throw 

Tennis 

Softball 

Track and Field 
Swimming 



ENTRY DEADLINE PLAY BEGINS 

January 11 January 14 

February 8 February 11 

February 15 February 18 

March 1 March 4 

March 29 April 1 

April 26 April 29 

April 26 April 29 

May 10 May 13 

May 17 May 20 



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record to 9-13 overall and 1-6 in 
the conference. McNeese is now 
9-15 for the season and 2-7 on 
their GSC slate. 

The Demons had little trouble 
in their victory as they led by as 
much as 19 points in the second 
half. They led by 14 at halftime 
as the score was 34-20. 

High scorer for the Demons was 
David Clark. Clark hit on eight 
of 12 field goal attempts and on 
five free throws for a total of 
21 points. He was followed by Billy 
Ray who ended the evening with 
seven field goals and two charity 
tosses for 16 points. Other Demon 
players in double figures were Les- 
ter Lee with 13 and Sam Watts 
with 10. High for the Cowboys 
was Clyde Briley with 33. 

NSC out rebounded their op- 
ponents 41-31. High for the De- 
mons was Sam Watts with seven. 



CANE THEATRE 

Natchitoches, La. Phone 2922 
BOX OFFICE OPENS 
Saturday-Sunday — 12:45 
Monday-Friday — 5:45 



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VOL. LI — No. 18 Northwestern State College, Natchitoches La. Friday, Mar. 5, 1965 




Natchitoches High Coach Is Named 
To Lead Demon Basketball Team 



Barbara Wallace 



Pat Simon 



Betty Sue DeWitt 



Barbara Wallace Named President 
Of Associated Women Students 



By Karen Kivell 

Barbara Wallace captured the 
top position in the Northwestern 
Associated Women Students elec- 
tion held in the Fine Arts Audi- 
torium Wednesday at 6 p. m. 

Speeches by each of the candi- 
dates and skits climaxed the three- 
week campaign. The election was 
originally scheduled Feb. 24, but 
had to be postponed until March 
3. This gave the candidates an ex- 
tra week to solicit votes. 

Elected to assist Barbara on the 
AWS exective board were Pat Si- 
mon, vice president, and Betty Sue 
DeWitt, international AWS repre- 
sentative. Other officers are Mary 
Pat Hayden, corresponding secre- 
tary; Sandra Byrd, recording sec- 
retary; Carolyn Brewer, social 



chairman; Carol Stone, treasurer; 
and Catherine Wall, publicity 
chairman. 

Candidates for the position of 
president were automatically as- 
sured of a office. The person re- 
ceiving the most votes was elected 
president; second highest, vice- 
president; and third highest, IAWS 
representative. 

Results of the election were re- 
leased to house directors at 9:30 
p. m. after all of the votes were 
counted by Dean of Women Lucile 
M. Hendrick and the present AWS 
officers excluding those up for re- 
election. 

Competing for social chairman 
were Vida Lee Broussard, Carolyn 
Brewer and Patsy Watkins. Janet 
Jones, Patty Shelton and Catherine 



Wall sought the office of publicity 
chairman. 

Robin Butler, Sandra Byrd and 
Bonnie Methvin ran for the office 
of recording secretary. Seeking the 
office of corresponding secretary 
were Carolyn Everett, Mary Pat 
Hayden and Jerry Piatt. 

Competing for treasurer were 
Carol Stone, Amy Maxwell and Sue 
Shipp. 

The new officers replace Kate 
Thibodeaux, president; Irby Mc- 
Can, vice president; Becky Al- 
phin, IAWS representative; Caro- 
lyn Brewer, corresponding secre- 
tary; Barbara Wallace, recording 
secretary; Priscilla Dorgan, trea- 
surer; Mary Ann Jones, social 
chairman; and Lynette Griffin, 
publicity chairman. 



Awards Presented 



Annual NSC Honors Banquet Held 



For their outstanding schorlarly 
achievement, 79 students of North- 
western State College received 
special awards at the 4th Annual 
Academic Honors Banquet held 
Tuesday evening in St. Denis din- 
ing hall. 

President John S. Kyser, spoke 
on the subject of, "Excellence", at 
the banquet sponsored by Phi Kap- 
pa Phi in cooperation with Kappa 
Delta Pi, Beta Beta Beta, Nu Sig- 
ma Chi, Phi Eta Sigma and Sigma 
XL 

Dr. Leo T. Allbritten, dean of 
instruction and dean of the gradu- 
ate school, presented the awards. 

Watson Memorial 

The Eugene P. Watson Memor- 
ial Scholarship award in memory 
of the late Dr. Eugene P. Watson, 
former librarian at NSC, was pre- 
sented to J. O. Charrier. The scho- 
larship, awarded for the first time, 
is an annual scholarship award pre- 
sented to a first semester senior 
with an over-all academic average 
of 3.4 or better. 

The Phi Epsilon Kappa Honor 
Award presented by the Depart- 
ment of Health, Physical Educa- 
tion, and Recreation was awarded 
to Gary Johnson. 

John Slade and Frances Council 
were recipients of two Social Sci- 
ence Honor Awards. 

Two awards requiring a 3.3 aca- 
demic average, the Freshman Aca- 
demic Award and Home Economics 
Academic Award, were presented 
to Susan Reese, and Irby McCann 
respectively. 

Several awards requiring a 3.1 
academic average and their reci- 



pients included the American Busi- 
ness Education Association Award 
to Delores Nichols Young; Blue 
Key Academic Award to Wilmer 
Otis Crain, Jr.; Beta Beta Beta 
Academic Award to William J. 
Beasley; Contemporary Dancers 
Academic Award to Mrs. Romona 
Bott Reynolds; Kappa Delta Phi 
Academic Award to Sue Chance; 
Library Science Award to Mrs. 
Mildred McFarlane; Mathematics 
Freshman Award to Malcolm Ray 
Hernandez; Louisiana Society of 
Certified Public Accountants 
Award and Pi Omega Pi Award to 
John W. Lewis; Sigma Alpha Iota 
Honor Certificate to Thellie Levee. 

Phi Kappa P h i Sophomore 
Awards presented to sophomores 
with a 3.5 or better average for 
each term attended were awarded 
to Nettie E. Patton, Sharon L. Hill- 
man, Shirley Jean Bigelow, Wal- 
lace Hebert, and Thomas White- 
head. 

Freshman Awards 

Several freshman awards includ- 
ed Ni Sigma Chi Chapter of Alpha 
Labada Delta Freshman Awards 
presented to Deirdre Chaney and 
Pamela Pepperman for two mem- 
bers having the highest over-all 
average for their freshmen year: 
Phi Eta Sigma Freshman Awards 
presented to Wayne W. Willis, 
James P. David, and William N. 
Richardson for freshmen men hav- 
ing the highest over-all academic 
average. 

Also recognized and presented 
certificates of merit were fresh- 
man students who are eligible for 
membership in Nu Sigma Chi fra- 



ternity for freshman women who 
have a first semester average of 
3.5 or better and Phi Eta Sigma, 
fraternity for freshman men who 
have earned a minimum of a 3.5 
average at the end of their first 
semester. Those students included 
Patricia Ann Bales, Carolyn Bar- 
ney, Carolyn Brandon, Robin Ann 
Butler, Anita B. Chaplin, Peggy 
Ruth Deggs, and Mrs. Jo Ann Der- 
bonne. 

Betty Jean Doiron, Mrs. Dorothy 
Wiley Dollar, Louise Fay Gary, 
Marie Evelyn Gary, Sarah F. Grun- 
wald, Sallie Jo Heflin, Barbara L. 
Hyde, Mary Virginia Delly, Ann L. 
Kovar, Mrs. June Elizabeth Mc- 
Bride, Marjorie M. Major, Marga- 
ret Meyertones, Mrs. Sarah Barrett 
Mills, Helen Marie ixon, Lovellyn 
Muench, Frances Diane Nickerson, 
Andrea Len Nielsen, Lois Marie 
Page. 

Linda Susan Reese, Linda Robi- 
chaux, Pamela Rushing, Jad Lin 
Schoenberg, Marilyn Slack, Patri- 
cia Lynn Smith, Sandra D. Steph- 
ens, Sandra Jo Stevens, Mary An- 
nell Stiles, Barbara Ann Tauzin, 
Judy Arleen Terry, and Frances 
Allen Toler. 

Michael Robert Armstrong, T. 
Timothy Brown, James P. David, 
Ronald Dean Fields, Danny James 
Gayer, Douglas John Giles, Joseph 
Alan Hartlerroad, Malcolm Ray 
Hernandez, Murraye D. Joyce, John 
Luther Landrem, Raymond H. 
O'Quinn, Jr., Meade Hubbard 
Phelps, John Rhett Ramsey, Ronald 
George Sanders, Heinrich Gustav 
Schettler, Eddy Waller Sherman, 
Thomas Norwood Whitehead, and 
; Wayne Winston Willis. 



President John S- Kyser has an- 
nounced that a former Demon 
Roundballer, Tynes B. Hildebrand 
of Natchitoches, has been selected 
as head basketball coach for the 
Northwestern State College De- 
mons. He will replace Huey Cran- 
ford who announced his resigna- 
tion last week. 

Hildebrand started his basket- 
ball career at Florien High School. 
Here he was elected to the All 
State Basketball Club in 1950. At 
Northwestern, he was known for 
his play making ability, bis re- 
bounding, and his sharp eye for 
the bucket. In 1953-54, he was 
elected team captain and president 
of the N club. He also earned four 
letters in track. He graduated 
with honors from Demonland in 
1954 with a major in Health and 
Physical Education. He received 
his masters degree in 1961. 

The new Demon coach has spent 
his entire nine years of coaching 
at Natchitoches High School. Here, 
he has compiled a record of 183 
wins and 76 defeats. Under his 
direction, the Red Devils have won 
district 2-AA six times and have 
placed below second only once. 

Hildebrand's started his coach- 
ing careeer in 1954-55 by placing 
second in the District. He went 
on in the state playoffs and his 
team finally bowed out in the 
quarter-finals. After his tour of 
duty in the service, he returned 
to the Demon squad and led them 
to a 24-9 record season plus the 
State Class AA Championship. 
This was the first of five straight 
district titles. His other distinc- 
tions include runner-up on two 
occasions, once to the semi finals, 
and quarter finals three times. 

The 34 year old Hildebrand has 
received many honors not all re- 
lated to coaching. In 1958-59 he 
was named "Outstanding Young 
Teacher of Natchitoches Parish." 
He was named Coach of the Year 
in 1961 and Outstanding Coach in 
his District in 1961 and 1965. He 
was also named coach of the 
Louisiana High School All-Star 
Team in 1958. 




Invitation Deadline 

Graduating seniors should place 
their orders for invitations before 
the March 25 deadline. All orders 
should be placed with Mrs. John- 
som in the NSC Bookstore. 



Tynes B. Hildebrand 



Placement Office 
Sets Interviews 

Two important series of inter- 
views will be held in the Place- 
ment Office, Room 19 Caldwell 
Hall next Tuesday and Wednesday, 
it was announced by Mr. Joe W. 
Webb, Director of Placement. 

Tuesday, March 9, brings Mr. 
Carl Salamone of the Southern 
Service Center in Atlanta, Geor- 
gia, to the Placement Office, inter- 
viewing male students 21-30 not 
subject to military draft, majoring 
in Business Administration, Ac- 
counting, or with knowledge of 
buying, merchandising, and per- 
sonnel. The organization, estab- 
lished in 1895, employs 70,000 
people in the U.S. and 30 foreign 
countries. 

March 10, Wednesday, is the day 
Mr. J.L. McKinney of the Baroic: 
Company, a division of the Nation- 
al Lead Company conducts inter- 
views. Concerned chiefly with the 
oil industry, Baroid is primarily 
interested in seniors from all sci- 
ence, engineering, and business 
backgrounds. 

Appointments for these and 
other forthcoming interview dates 
may be made with Mr. Joe W. 
Webb, Director of Placement. 
Room 19, Caldwell Hall. 




Tommy Putnam 



Scotty Maxwell 



Three New Class Presidents Named 
To Serve On Student Council 



Steve Blount, Northwestern Stu- 
dent Council president, has an- 
nounced the appointment of three 
NSC students to fill vacancies left 
in student offices. 

Thomas W. Putnam,math major 
from Merryville, has been named 
senior class president replacing 
former class president Jimmy 
Berry. Mike Miller, microbiology 
major from Winnfield, and William 
Scotty Maxwell., an accounting 
major from Urania, were chosen 
as the sophmore and freshman 
class presidents. 

Putnam has been active in the 
NSC Reserve Officers Training 
Corps for the past three years, and 



is a veteran member of the Black 
Knights Drill Team. He has also 
served as military editor Of the 
Potpourri. 

Miller, a graduate from Winn- 
field High School, served as vice- 
president of the junior class, edited 
the high school year book, was. 
active in Pelican Boys. State, voted 
most intelligent, and named as Mr. 
Winnfield High School. 

Maxwell, as a high school stu- 
dent, won the American Legion 
Award, served on the student coun- 
cil, and was president of the Parish 
and the Urania 4-H clubs. He also 
served as the freshmen Men's rep- 
resentitive at NSC. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, March 5, 1965 



Phi Kappa Phi Gets 32 New Initiates 
At Annual Spring Initiation Service 



Dr. W. G. Erwin, head of the de- 
partment of Biological Sciences and 
president of the NSC chapter of 
Phi Kappa Phi, has announced the 
initiation of 32 students into the 
honor society at the annual mid- 
year initiation services at North- 
western. 

Students initiated were Sandra 
K. Methivin of Athens; Mrs. Betty- 
Howard Campbell, Carolyn Marie 
Everett, Mrs. Lenora R. Manning, 
Betty Sue Dewitt, Marie Medica, 
and Marilyn V. Vanhoof, all of 
Alexandria; Mrs. Joan Lee McClung 
of Sheveport; Judith L. McLain of 
Campti; Patsy Holley of Castor; 
David B. Williams of Tulsa, Okla.; 
Samuel Masson of Cloutierville; 
Bettye Marye Lilly of Florien; Gary 



A. Johnson of Haynesville; Billie 
Ann Simmons of Jena. 

Mary Ann Horton of Coushatta; 
Carta Ruth Paul and Olivia A. 
Rhodes of Monterey; Grover Lamar 
Bates, Mary Rebecca Stewart, Katy 
Watkins, all of Natchitoches; Mrs. 
Glenda Bates of Ringgold; Mildred 
McFarlane of Seneca, S. C; Mrs. 
Lillie Ann Purvis of Spring Creek. 

Charlotte W. Hood of Springhill; 
Nikki Towry«f Stilwell, Okla.; Mrs. 
Mary Dell Fletcher of Verda; 
Sandra Walker of Waterproof 
Sandra Walker of Waterproof; 
Daniel W. Fox of West Monroe; 
Lucille Hart of Westlake; Andrea 
Lisenbea of Winnfield; and William 
L. Wood of Jal, New Mexico. 



Alpha Beta Alpha 
Names Secretary 

Alpha Beta Alpha, library sci- 
ence fraternity, held a business 
meeting, Monday, in the library 
science department. Business re- 
lating to the forthcoming activities 
of the current semester were dis- 
cussed and planned. 

Juaneli Savage, English major 
from Glenmora, was elected to 
fill the vacancy of recording secre- 
tary. 

Other announcements include a 
social to be held for all members, 
pledges, and new prospective 
pledges. Anyone interested in ABA 
are cordially invited to attend this 
social and meet the fraternity 
members and become acquainted 
with its purpose. The social will 
be March 8, in the Russell Library 
Room 300, at 6 p.m. 




Greek Talk 



Delta Zeta 

Epsilon Beta Chapter of Delta 
Zeta will hold initiation Sunday, 
March 7. Pledges have been busy 
putting the finishing touches on 
their scrapbooks, gathering up the 
last of their pledge points, and 
taking the pledge final. 

The pledges are anxious for the 
arrival of initiation and for the 
privilege and honor that accom- 
panies the wearing of the DZ pin. 
Actives and pledges alike are look- 
ing forward to this entry into the 
Delta Zeta sisterhood. 

Last Monday night, Delta Zeta 
pledges performed their entertain- 
ment program for the actives. The 
actives were entertained by skits, 
pantomimes, and songs, all of 
which showed great originality. 
The following night, the actives 
returned the entertainment to the 
pledges. These parties have be- 
come an anual event which pre- 
cedes initiation. 

Due to the dismissal of classes 
last week, the Delta Zeta Rose 
Cotillion has been postponed until 
April 3. 



Sigma Kappa 

The Sigma Kappa sorority was 
honored recently by a visit from 
their national secretary-treasurer. 
Mrs. E. D. Taggart, who inspected 
the sorority and delivered a mess* 
age from the national board. 

Continuing their hard work on 
gerantology, the actives and pled- 
ges visited the Natchitoches Nur- 
sing Home yesterday and celebrat- 
ed their monthly birthday party. 

There was a pizza party for Sig- 
ma Kappa last Saturday evening 
and it was followed by entertain- 
ment from the sorority members 
who were practicing guitar lessons. 

Committees are currently mak- 
ing final preparations for the 
spring formal which will be held 
March 6. The flowers for the oc- 
casion have already arrived. 

Initiation ceremonies were held 
for the pledges Thursday at 4:30 
p.m. Following the ceremonies a 
banquet honoring the new initiates 
was held. 

Violets to Sue Shipp and Bar- 
bara Wallace who were nominated 
for AWS positions. 



Recently initiated into Northwestern's Gamma Psi chapter of Kappa Aupha, men's social 
Fraternity, are (First row, left to right) Roy DeBlieux, Tommy Nnchols, Stephen Gregg 
and Dickie Robertson. (Second Roy) Warren Fraser, Tommy Lewis, Charles Smith, 
John DeBlieux. (Third Row) Dulane Durham, Don Snell, Jere Daye, and Dillon 
Matlock. 



IA Club Holds 
Monthly Meeting 

The regular meeting of the NSC 
Industrial Arts Club was held Feb. 
18. Prior to the meeting pictures 
were taken of the officers of the 
club for the Potpourri. The bus- 
iness session included a discus- 
sion and appointment of a com- 
mittee for planning the annual 
forum and banquet. Representa- 
tives from the club, the depart- 
ment, and Iota Lambda Sigma will 
serve on the committee. 

Following the business, Mr. E. 
H. Payne, sales manager for the 
multigraph division, Beaumont, 
Texas spoke to the group on op- 
portunities for employment in the 
Addressograph-Multigraph Corpo- 
ration. 




For Good 
Hair Coloring 
Shaping 
Styling 



visit 

TRESSIES 
Beauty Salon 

in 

East Natchitoches 
Call 4536 

Closed Mondays 

See 
Tressie - Irma 
Jean - Linda 

201 EAST Third Street 
Across from Warrens Mkt. 




STUDENTS 

Let us pamper your 
parents when they come 
to visit you. 

For Room Reservations 
dial 6401 

'Wake-up Coffee and Papers' 




Get the jump on Spring 
and warm the heart of that 
special someone with a 
with a portrait from Uhrbach's 

Call 5556 or 5557 for Appointment 

UHRBACH'S STUDIO 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 

NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 



Newest FABERGE masterpiece . . . 
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Bound to be the most treasured gift 
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Stunning gift boxed in handsome 
silver-flashed bottle green decanters. 
$5.00, $8.50, $10.00 



EATON'S STATIONERY 
For reasonable priced stationery from 
$1 on up come to us, the exclusive 
dealer of Natchitoches. 

The stationery comes in many as- 
sorted styles, colors and some scented. 
You will find them in the convenient 
portfolio or the beautiful decorated 
boxes. 



Two Stores To Serve You 
DeBLIEUX'S PHARMACY 



BROADMOOR SHOPPING CENTER 
PHONE 4582 



NEW DRUG STORE 

SECOND AND ST. DENIS 
PHONE 2386 



Friday, March 5, 1965 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



Editorials 



Better Student Conduct Urged 
Through Leadership, Example 

There has been much discussion in recent weeks pertain- 
ing to the cultural level, or general conduct, of the students 
on campus. The Administration and those persons sincerely 
interested in the well-being of the College are greatly con- 
cerned about a small group of students who are bringing ad- 
verse criticism on the entire student body and the College. 

The fact that there are only a few students directly re- 
sponsible for this degrading conduct makes it most difficult 
to combat. The Student Council cannot, and should not, legis- 
late rules on every facet of life at NSC, but if the current trend 
continues, someone is going to have to take some definite 
action. 

One of the primary issues of concern is the dress of the 
male students on campus. It is most embarrassing when visit- 
ing officials are on campus to have them enter the dining halls 
and see the attire of some of the men at the evening meal. One 
does not have to "dress up" to be appropriately attired, but 
everyone should at least wear clothes suitable for attending 
class. 

In the last issue of the "Current Sauce" there was a series 
of pictures illustrating some areas of the campus that needed 
the attention of the administration. All of these areas have 
been cleaned-up, and other areas have also been corrected. But, 
the major problem is with the responsibilties of the students 
for maintaining their part of the campus. 

The cleanliness of the campus is indicative of the students 
that live here. One can hardly walk across the campus without 
seeing beer cans and other litter scattered all along the way. 
This is a direct reflection on the entire student body and par- 
ticulary those irresponsible persons who persistently clutter 
the grounds. 

We are most fortunate to have a campus abundantly en- 
dowed with natural beauty, but if the current trend continues, 
all of our natural attributes will be worthless. 

Another of the major problems facing students and the 
administration at NSC is the stealing that is occuring in the 
dining halls. Students seem to be of the opinion that if they 
buy a seven day meal ticket, it enables them to loan their ID 
card to other students on the weekend when they are gone 
and to help themselves to any of the silver or other furnishings 
in the dining halls. All students must realize that when they 
buy a meal ticket, it is sold for less than the actual cost of the 
meals because they are expected to miss some of the meals 
during the semester. 

Students must also realize that when they steal from the 
dining halls, student center, or any other of the facilities on 
campus that they and other fellow students are going to have 
to pay for the articles or do without something else that is 
needed. 

One might ask how these problems are going to be solved 
without direct and positive action by the Administration or the 
Student Council. It can't — unless the responsible students start 
taking a stand and speaking out when something is wrong. 
Students should practice being leaders instead of mute specta- 
tors. Unless the students of Northwestern start conducting 
themselves in a manner appropriate to college students you 
can expect, justifiably, that the rules and mandatory restric- 
tions will become even more prevalent and binding. 

This is an excellent opportunity for the students to exhibit 
their maturity and prove that they can act favorably without 
force. 



PASSING IN REVIEW 




By PERRY ANGLE 



Among the more fascinating cor- 
ners of NSC's Armory is the rifle 
range, which occupies about a 
fifth of the bottom floor. This 50 
foot range is the domain of the 
rifle team, members of which can 
be found blasting away at small- 
bore targets anytime between 4 
and 5:30 week-day afternoons. 

Firing a weapon correctly, as 
anyone knows, is a good deal hard- 



Registration Changes Suggested 

Now that we've all had a while to let the pain and the 
memory fade away, it might be good to take a long hard look 
at registration. 

First of all — we'd like to congratulate everyone concerned 
students, clerical workers, Faculty and Administration for 
doing the best job possible under the conditions this spring. 
But we think that it's too much on everybody to register 2000 
students a day. A case in point — lines of students at the book- 
store a week after classes had begun, still waiting for texts. 
Again this is nobodv's fault— there's just too many to process 
completely in that short a time. It's not fair to anyone con- 
cerned. 

There is, we think, an answer. 
Pre-registration. 

Many, many colleges do this successfully. Generally along 
these lines: All students who will be academically eligible for 
the next semester according to their mid-semester grades are 
allowed to pre-register. There is generally a period of two or 
three weeks before the end of the semester when these stu- 
dents can arrange their next semesetr's schedule, get their 
advisor's approval and then, by appointment, receive their 
class-cards. They can pay their fees then or later, buy their 
books anytime afterward. 

We realize that this system might present several new 
problems, mainly more preparation earlier on the part of the 
advisors, administration, book-store, etc. But we also think 
that NSC can have a successful pre-registration system, as so 
many other schools do, and ease many problems by doing so. 

The idea is certainly worth investigation by all concerned 
with our method of registration. By Perry Angle 



Student Council 
Minutes 

March 1, 1965 

The regular meeting of the 
Northwestern Student Council was 
held at 6 p.m. in Bullard Hall. The 
meeting was called to order by 
President Steve Blount. The roll 
was called, and the minutes of the 
previous meeting were read and 
approved. Absent from the Coun- 
cil meeting: Joe Traigle, Pat Hol- 
ley and Sarah Grunwall. 

President Blount reported that 
the AWS election which is to be 
held at 6 p.m. Wednesday night 
would conflict with the Wednes- 
day night dance. Scotty Maxwell 
moved that the dance be held 
Thursday night from 6-8 p.m. Sec- 
ond by Betty Moore. Motion pass- 
ed. It was reported that when the 
dance fund increases $7 a free 
dance will be given. Working at 
the dance this week are Sarah 
Grunwall, Stan Branton, Scotty 
Maxwell, Carolyn Thomas, and Cal- 
bert Marcantel. 

Dean Fulton explained the pro- 
posed plans of the new student 
center to the Council. The new 
student center will be two stories 
high and will contain essentially 
the same things that the first stu- 
dent center plans contained. Ad- 
jacent to the new student center 
will be a 65 car parking lot. The 
student center will be fully air 
conditioned, and each room will 
have facilies for piping in music. 
It is hoped that the new student 
center will be completed by the 
fall of 1966. 

It was reported that the "N" on 
the water tower represents the N 
Club not Northwestern. The Coun- 
cil voted not to recommend that 
the "N" be changed to "NSC" since 
the N Club did originally have the 
"N" put up. The Council is still 
working on having the "N" placed 
on the Fine Arts Auditorium when 
the water tower is torn down. 

The Council approved Scotty 



er than our screen heros would 
lead us to believe. It's never been 
a snap for anyone to align a 12 
pound weapon on a spot 1 milli- 
meter in diameter 50 ft. away, hold 
the weight steady and fire the 
weapon at the same time. To vary 
a millimeter right or left up or 
down when you aim, is enough to 
move the bullet a quarter of an 
inch by the time it hits the target. 
Enough to score 6 instead of 10 
for the shot. 

Right now the 8 man team, 
which is co-captained by Cadet 
First-Sergeant Paul Jeansonneand 
Cadet-Sergeant Chris Young, is 
practicing for a meet at LSU on 
the 13th of March. They finished 
tenth in a field of 17 last year 
in this meet. Beating LSU itself 
is difficult, especially when you 
consider that they have enough 
members to field three teams, and 
have a coach, a sergeant who does 
nothing else but coach the teams. 

Still our boys have some good 
practice scores lately (Chris 
Young fired an 88 out of a possible 
100 in the standing position) and 
figures to move up several notch- 
es. 

It may bring the trouble in 
South Viet Nam closer to home 
when you realize that seven North- 
western graduates are serving as 
officers in that terror-ridden coun- 
try. 

Best cadet last week was Cadet 
Corporal Jim Ellis, who is the 
right guide for the first platoon 
of "C" Co. Jim, a native of Orange, 
Calif, is a geography major and a 
member of the Black Knights. He 
scored a 99 out of 100, his only 
imperfection was that his right 
heel was slightly behind his left 
in the position of attention. 



Maxwell's appointment of Sarah 
Grunwall as Vice-President of the 
Freshman Class and Gus Bridges 
as Freshman Men's Representative. 
It also voted to approve Tommy 
Putnam's appointment of Gary 
Johnson as Vice-President of the 
Senior Class. 

Alix Harris raised the question 
as to whether the Blue Key movie 
was shown on a temporary screen 
or whether the one used last week 
was the screen which is to be used 
every week. Blount will check into 
the matter. 

It was reported that there has 
been no discussion on whether stu- 
dents will have to make up the 
time lost when the power plant 
broke down. Dean Fulton reported 
(See Student Council, Page 5) 



OZTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 




LETTERS 
To The 
EDITOR 

February 22, 1965 

Mr. Duffy Wall 
The Current Sauce 
Northwestern State College 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 
Dear Student Body: 

For three years I was one of a 
large majority of students who 
"griped" about the Student Coun- 
cil. Yes, I was a hypocrit like 
many of you. I had never been 
to a Student Council meeting and 
I still considered it my privilege 
to air my negative reactions which 
were merely outside reactions to 
Student Council decisions. I de- 
cided a year ago to run for a Stu- 
dent Council office in order to 
find out exactly what was going 
on in that select group! I was 
privileged to be able to hold an 
office for the past term. 

Never have I felt more ashamed 
of myself than when I look back 
over the years and see how ridic- 
ulous my gripes were. They were 
baseless. Your Student Council rep- 
resents you — It is a thinking 
group of active maturing minds- 
minds that try to please the ma- 
jority loithout overlooking the im- 
portant minority. This is not an 
easy task to fulfill whether con- 
sidering entertainment or where 
to place a mailbox. No matter how 
long the Student Council studies 
a situation or plans it with the 
best interest of the students in 
mind, some few will not be pleased 
and will feel motivated to exer- 
cise their freedom of speech in 
the most negative of ways. Yet, 
these same few are not the ones 
who take the time to attend Stu- 
dent Council meetings or to serve 
actively on committees of the 
group they chose to represent 
them and of which they represent 
an immediate part. 

Next time, you find yourself 
guilty of airing a negative opin- 
ion about the Student Council, 
stop, evaluate your thoughts, and 
ask yourself? Have I done my 
share in contributing to this (or 
any other) decision the Student 
Council has made? Was I present 
to give my opinion at the meet- 
ing? Did I take the time or make 
any effort to get in touch with 
my representative to ask him to 
voice my opinion — affirmative or 
negative — at the meetings? 

If you answer no to any ques- 
tion, consider your motives in 
voicing your opinion. Maybe you 
will not be so quick to judge 
those working in your behalf and 
for your benefit. If you still feel 
justified in your judgment, try 
being a Student Council member. 
In a few months, you will wonder 
how you once dared to gripe. 

A 1965 graduate 



[J C*urrent Sauce 

ESTABLISHED 1914 

Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879 Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks. In 
the fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
scription $3 the year payable in advance. 

Member of the Associated Collegiate Press 

Duffy Wall Editor-in-Chief 

Sharon Hillman Associate Editor 

Kenny Baker News Editor 

Jerry Brill Sports Editor 

John Lewis Business Manager 

Linda Broughton .... Advertising Manager 

Jon Gibson Staff Artist 

Roy G. Clark Faculty Adviser 

Editorial Staff: Wallev Hebert, Perry 
Angle, Ann Massey, Ed Cullen, Danny 
Gayer, Karen Kivell, Judy Russell and 
Patsy Watkins. 

Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not reflect 
the opinions of the student body or the 
administration and faculty of the college. 

The Current Sauce prints the newh im- 
partially. It supports what it believes to 
be right, and opposes what it believes to 
be wrcng, regardless. 

This paper is printed by the Graphic 
Arts Division of the Industrial Education 
Department of Northwestern 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, March 5, 1965 



Demons Drop Last Three Ballgames 
To ^nd Season With 9-17 Record 



The University of Southwestern 
Louisiana, led by Little All-Amer- 
ican Dean Church, handed the 
Northwestern State College De- 
mons their third straight defeat 
by a score of 91-76. This brought 
the Demons record to a cool 9-16. 

Church put on quite a show for 
the home town fans as he set three 
new school marks and tied an old 
one which he already held. He 
became the first player in USL 
history to score over 600 points 
in one season as he poured in 34, 
23 of them in the last half. He also 
hit on 18 of 20 from the charity 
line for his other two marks. 

The Bulldogs took the lead in 
the opening minutes of the ball 
game and never lost it. The Dem- 
ons were able to pull within six 
points in the second half but Mr. 
Church then took over to score 17 
points in the last ten minutes and 
put it out of reach. 

Northwestern managed to get 
four of their players in double 
figures. David Clark was high for 
the night as he canned 18 points. 
He was followed by Billy Ray who 
collected 15. Kenny Arthur and 
Lester Lee finished with 11 and 
10 respectively. 

The Demons trailed at halftime 
38-29. 



TECH 

The Northwestern Demons drop- 
ped their fourth straight in the 
Pine Cone Classic as they bowed 
to the Bulldogs of La. Tech by a 
score of 85-55. 

The loss for the Demons was 
their eighth in nine league games 
and brought their overall record 
to 9-15. The win by Tech tied them 
for second place in the GSC with 
Southeastern and left them with 
an overall record of 11-10. 

Both teams were cold in the 
first half as only 54 points were 



scored. Tech did most of the scor- 
ing as they managed 28 compared 
to the Demons' 26. The Bulldogs 
looked like a different team in the 
second half as they canned 57 
points while Northwestern con- 
tinued on to a mild 32 from the 
floor. 

Sam Watts gave the Demons its 
only lead for the night as he hit 
on a jumper to make the count 
26-24. Two quick goals by the Bull- 
dogs, however, gave the lead back 
to Tech, never more to be lost. 

The Demons were held to only 
one man in double figures. This 
was David Clark who had ten. 



La. College 

The Northwestern Demons 
dropped their seventeenth game of 
the season Monday night as they 
were downed by the La. College 
Wildcats, 75-64. The win for the 
Wildcats upped their record to 15- 
11. The Demons have won only 
nine. 

High for Northwestern was Ken- 
ny Arthur. Arthur hit on eight of 
14 shots from the floor and on six 
of seven charity tosses for a total 
of 22 points. Two other Demon 
players ended in double figures. 
They were David Clark and Sam 
Watts. Clark finished with 17 while 
Watts collected 12. Arthur was 
also the teams high rebounder as 
he pulled in eight. 

The Demons shot at a 44 per cent 
clip as they hit on 23 of 46 shots 
from the field. The Wildcats ended 
with 30 of 62 for a 46 per cent 
mark. 



KNOW BASEBALL? 

Anyone interested in working 
with baseball statistics, box scores, 
records? 

Any interested student should 
contact the "Current Sauce" or the 
News Bureau immediately. 

Required are: an interest in the 
sport and free afternoons. 



Works Of Sandburg 
To Be Presented 

"The World of Carl Sandburg" 
will be presented by the Kaleido- 
scope Players comprised of three 
actors and a folksinger, next Tues- 
day at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Aud- 
itorium. Tickets are $2.20 for 
adults, $1.10 for children and all 
Northwestern students will be ad- 
mitted on their ID cards. 



Gymnastic Team 
Wins Third Meet 

The Northeast State College 
Gymnasts team captured their 
third straight victory as they 
downed the visiting Demons of 
NSC by a score of 68-44. The In- 
dians were paced by Henry Mag- 
daleno who placed first in six 
events and scored a close second 
in another. 

The Demons were able to pick 
up only one first place. It was won 
by Harry Shutt on the trampoline. 
He scored 9.05 in this event. 



Religion Classes Slated 

At Newman Center 

Classes in the Catholic religion 
for the spring semester are sche- 
duled to begin at 6:30 p. m. on 
March 8 at the Catholic Student 
Center. 

Tuesday's lectures will concern 
"Holy Week," Christ's last week 
on earth. "Basic Teachings of the 
Church," will be the topic of the 
lectures on Wednesdays. 

"The Problem of Man," is the 
subject of Thursday evenings. This 
class deals with life and explor- 
ing the mysteries which are com- 
mon to all. Fridays' class is de- 
signed for those students seriously 
contemplating marriage. 

Father Cornelius O'Brien urges 
all Catholic students to come and 
bring their friends. 



Cranford Resigns Coaching Position 
As Head Of Demon Basketball Squad 



Huey W. Cranford, head basket- 
ball coach for the Northwestern 
Demons, announced Tuesday that 
he had turned in his resignation 
effective June 30. The announce- 
ment was made to his Demon 
squadsmen prior to the Demon-La- 
Tech ball game. Cranford an- 
nounced that he planned to do 
further graduate study. 

Cranford has been at NSC since 
1957. His overall record has been 
116 wins and 97 losses. During his 
career at NSC his 1957-58 team 
finished as co-champions in the 
Gulf States Conference. This team 
also finished second in Shreve- 
port's Gulf South Classic. 

In the 1959-60 season, the De- 
mons won 23 while losing only 
five. This was good enough to 
win the GSC and the Gulf South 
Classic championship. 

Before coming to Northwestern, 
Cranford did his prep coaching 
at Oak Grove and Florien. He led 
his Oak Grove team in 1952 to 
the runner-up spot in Class C. He 
captured the state title at Florien 
in Class B in 1954. His overall prep 
record was 225 wins to 76 losses. 

Cranford's eight year record at 
Demonland was as follows: 1957- 
58: 20-7; 1958-59: 18-10; 1959-60: 
23-5; 1960-61: 16-11; 1961-62: 10- 
17; 1962-63: 8-17; 1963-64: 12-14; 





Huey Cranford 

1964-65: 9-17. 

Cranford's conference record 
stands at 43-32 while his Gulf 
South Classic record is 6-6. 



Dining Hall Food 

A University of Minnesota dorm- 
itory resident with a sense of hu- 
mor about dormitory food recently 
returned his tray to the clean-up 
area with a star-fish and a note: 
"What the heck is this? It's not 
even cooked." 



OPEN 
24 HOURS A DAY 

MURPHY'S RESTAURANT 

1215 WASHINGTON ST. PHONE 2609 




SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

98c Value 

4 section composition book 

$1 Value 

Notebook paper 300 sheets pkg 
Package of 30 pencils 
Filing Cabinets 



67c 

37c 
54c 
$1.67 up 



SPORTING GOODS 

Wilson Champ Tennis 

Racket $4.28 

Can of 3 

Balls $1.74 

Coast Guard Approved 

Boat Cushion $1.77 




HEALTH and BEAUTY AIDS 



13 oz. Size 

Aqua Net Hair Spray 

$1.50 Value 

Clairol's Loving Care 
Kleenex Tissue 



2 for 99c 

91c 
5 for 99c 



TV TRAYS 



$1.95 value 



61c 



GIBSON'S DISCOUNT 



224 Kyser Avenue 



Phone 4168 



Friday, March 5, 1965 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 5 



Demons To Open Baseball Season 
Against East Texas Wednesday 



By Sid Sers 

Northwestern's baseball team 
coached by Alvin "Cracker" 
Brown, will make its 1965 debute 
Wednesday afternoon against East 
Texas Baptist at Stroud FField on 
the Northwestern campus. The 
next home games will be the fol- 
lowing Friday and Saturday when 
the Demons host tough Phillips 
University. 

Coach Brown's diamond crew 
will have- six lettermen returning 
to help improve the club from 
last year's low winning team. Last 
year was a rugged season for 
Coach Brown as the expectations 
of a tough team fell short when 
the Demons were leading the Gulf 
States Conference and lost a re- 
markable seven of the last eight 
games. 

A majority of the pitching load 
will be carried by Ronnie "Bullet" 
Arnold, one of the finest pitchers 
in the Conference. Arnold was the 
backbone of the '64 teams pitching 
staff and will be making a strong 
bid for All-GSC honors this season. 

Aiding Arnold in the pitching 
chores will be another fine sopho- j 
more in Gary "Straw" Johnson, i 
Gary will be a big help to the 
squad this season as he was well | 
trained last year. Gary is an out- i 
standing relief pitcher and is good 
at saving games. Charlie Johnson's 
expectations of being a repeat for 
All-GSC honors were hampered 
when his action was limited by a 
hurt knee. If his knee doesn't give- 
way this season the Demons will 
be a strong contender for the GSC 
Championship. 

The team will be boosted by the 
most versatile player in the GSC 
in Tommy Stewart. Stewart can 
play every position on the dia- 
mond, and can play them well. He 
will also be a contender for All- 
GSC honors for he was one of the 
top hitters in the GSC ast season 
and hit a fantastic .508 batting ave- 
rage with Kelly's Truckers of 
Shreveport in the '64 summer 
league. He also hit 5 home runs. 

The Demons will be boosted tre- 
mendously by a fine pair from Pa- 
nola Junior College. Carroll Sis- 
trunk will be filling in a vacant 
short-stop position. Sistrunk hit 
.347 with 4 home runs. Along with 
Sistrunk is Bill Duckworth, a fine 
young catcher. At Panola, Bill hit 
.313 with 2 home runs. 

Five all-staters from the '64 sea- 
son will be making strong bids for 
starting berths on this years squad. 
Two of these recruits will aid the 
pitching staff. Harry Wilmore, Me- 
nard High, had a 7-2 record last 
season with a 1.60 earned run ave- 
rage. Wayne Jowers of Boyce had 
an 8-1 won-loss record with an 0.50 
ERA. Richard Anderson, a short- 
stop had a .396 batting average at 
West Monroe; while Danny Bob 
Turner and Mike Herron were hit- 
ting a .300 clip at Fair Park. 

The returning lettermen are 
Dean Sclavounos, a hard hitting 
outfielder, Gary and Charlie John- 
son, Arnold, Stewart, and Don Cal- 



vert. Calvert, a catcher, hit at a 
.400 clip for STECO of Shreveport 
last summer. 

The pitching staff includes Ar- 
nold, Johnson, Phillip Creel, Jow- 
ers, Wilmore, Larry Leach, Jack 
Simms, Keith Wright, and Danny 
Walker. 

The catchers are Duckworth and 
Calvert. At first base is Fred Park- 
er and Ted Wimberly. At second 
base will be Turner and John Ram- 
bin. Third basemen are Charles 
Wilkes, and Don Robinson. Short 
stoppers are Anderson and Sis- 
trunk. Outfielders are Don Beck, 
Paul Heishman, Don Mitchell, Den- 
nis "Hot Dog" Newbury, Sclavou- 
nos, and David Smith. Rounding 
out the team will be Tom Stewart 
who can play everything. 

The manager is James Posey. 
Cracker's aide on the coaching 
staff is Coach McPherson. Mr. Mc 
is also the pitching coach. 



Wool skirts each $2.50 

Sweaters each 2.50 

Cotton Shirts each .79 

Other Bargains can be 
found at 

The Daisy Shoppe 

Broadmoor 
Shopping Center 



Patronize 

Our 
Advertisers 




This years basketball roster of the Northwestern State 
College basketball team lists two 
seniors. They are Sam Watts and 
Emmette Hendricks. Both players 
rounded out the scedule Monday 
nigth as the Demons traveled to 
Alexandria to do battle with the 
La. College Wildcats. 



Student Council- 

(Continued from page 3) 
that as far as he knew students 
would not have to make the time 
up. 

J. O. Charrier announced that 
March 29 is the deadline for filing 
to run for a student council office. 
The election will be held on April 
13, and if a run-off is necessary, 
it will be held the following week. 
Deadline for filing for editor of 
the Current Sauce and Potpourri 
positions should file in Dean Ful- 
ton's office. 

Tommy Putnam asked if there 
was any way that groups who are 
out of town on approved school 
trips could vote an absentee ballot 
in campus elections. Blount re- 
ferred this to the elections board. 
Carolyn Thomas 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
SERVICES 
Old Lemee House 
Jefferson St. 
Every Sunday 11:00 A.M. 
All are welcome 



MAKE 

YOUR 

FAMILY 

AT HOME 
Away From Home. 



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SHAMROCK MOTEL 



Highway 1 South 



Phone 5566 




JJUJP' 



A NEW PROGRAM OF INTEREST TO 

MEN 



It isn't easy to become an officer in the United 
States Army. Only the best young men are selected . 
The training and course of study are demanding. 
* But if you can qualify — and you should find out 
if you can — you will receive training which will put 
you a step ahead of other college graduates. Army 
KOTC training will give you experience that most 
college graduates do not get — in leading and man- 
aging other men, in organizational techniques, in 
self-discipline and in speaking on your feet. This 
kind of experience will pay off in everything you 



do the rest of your life) _ 

Army ROTC has a new program designed spe-~ 
cifically for outstanding men who already have 
two years of college, and plan to continue their 
college work. During your junior and senior years 
in this program, you will receive $40 per month. 
Want to find out more about the program? Simply 
send in the coupon below, or see the Professor of 
Military Science if you are now attending an 
ROTC college. There's no obligation — except the 
one you owe to yourself. 



I 



If you're good enough to be an Army Officer, don't settle for less 

arWrotg 

Box 1040, Westbury, New York 11591 



Gentlemen: Please send me information on the new 2-Year Army ROTC Program. I am now a student at 



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Name. 

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.(college or university) and plan to continue my schooling at_ 



Address. 



City. 



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.Zip Code_ 



C265 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, March 5, 1965 



T 



Student Council 
Minutes 

February 22, 1965 

The regular meeting of the 
Northwestern Student Council was 
called to order by President Steve 
Blount. The roll was called and 
the minutes of the previous meet- 
ing were read and corrected. Ab- 
sent from the meeting was Mike 
Miller. 

President Blount appointed Scot- 
ty Maxwell, Freshman Men's Rep- 
resentative, as President of the 
Freshman class. Maxwell will ap- 
point all other freshman offices 
that are vacant. 

It was reported that all the ma- 
terial for the spring Student Di- 
rectories has been sent to Alex- 
andria and that the directories 
should be completed by March 15. 
Blount announced that 3,000 cop- 
ies had been ordered at a cost of 
$700. The covers are to be white 
with purple lettering. 

Joe Traigle announced that he 
had met with Dean Fulton and 
a representative from the tele- 
phone company concerning the in- 
stallation of private telephones in 
each room. The telephone company 
wants to install phones in each 
room and charge on a yearly bas- 
is. This would mean that the oc- 
cupants would have to pay more 
each month in order to pay for 
the months that they were not in 
school. It was also suggested by 
the phone company that students 
be allowed to place long distance 
calls on these private lines and 
that the school should collect for 
such calls. During the month of 
March, the phone company will 
turn in an estimate of the costs 
involved in installing private 
phones in the rooms. J. O. Char- 
rier suggested that the AMS adopt 
a resolution of five minute phone 
limit in the mens dorms in order 
to alleviate the present situation. 

Carolyn Thomas raised the ques- 
tion as to when the new post of- 
fice boxes were to be installed on 
campus. Dean Fulton reported that 
the post office had placed an or- 
der for the drop boxes. 

Blount reminded the Council a- 
bout absences and reported that 
all absences would be printed in 
the paper. 

Calbert Marcantel gave a brief 
report on the Wednesday night 
dances. Marcantel reported that 
a year ago the Council had estab- 
lished a plan to have a band at 
the dance each week. The band 
is now being payed $60 per week. 
At the end of summer school, 
there was a surplus of $53.28. 
Marcantel reported that there 
should be a free dance about two 
weeks from now. The Council gave 
a vote of thanks to Marcantel for 
the fine job that he has done each 
week in promoting the dance. 
Working this week at the dance 
are Sarah Grunwall, Stan Bran- 
ton, Scotty Maxwell, Carolyn 
Thomas, and Calbert Marcantel. 
Blount suggested that for the com- 
ing semester the three campus 
bands be hired alternately, each 
playing every three weeks. 

Marcantel reported that students 
living in D Frame and Schieb Hall 
had requested a sidewalk. Since 
the new building is being con- 
structed in back of Natchitoches 



sciences Academy Biology Department Gets $26,000 

To Meet At NSC 



The Louisiana Academy of Sci- 
ences, comprised of some 300 Lou- 
isiana scientists, most of whom are 
faculty members at colleges and 
universities, will hold its annual 
meeting March 26-27 in North- 
western's Williamson Hall under 
the local direction of Dr. James 
Rhodes, assistant professor of 
chemistry. 

The principal activity will be 
the presentation of scientific pap- 
ers in the various fields. There will 
be sessions in biological science, 
physical science, and social sci- 
ence. For the first time, there will 
be a session in computer science. 

A banquet will be held for the 
scientists on the evening of the 
26th at the El Camino Restaurant. 
The name of the banquet speaker 
and a distinguished lecturer will 
be announced later. 

President of the Academy is Dr. 
Charles Cavanaugh, head of the 
biology department at Louisiana 
College. 



High, they have no sidewalk. 

Barbara Wallace reported that 
students living off campus wanted 
to vote on the entertainment for 
next semester. J. O. Charrier re- 
ported that the entertainment 
committee was considering taking 
a poll in the student center in- 
stead of in the dorms so that all 
students would have a better op- 
portunity to vote. 

There being no further business, 
R. J. Ardoin moved that the meet- 
ing be adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Carolyn Thomas 

Secretary 



Patronize 
Our 

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For NSC Summer Science Program 



The National Science Founda- 
tion has awarded to the Depart- 
ment of Biological Sciences at 
Northwestern State College a 
$26,000 grant for support of a Co- 
operative College-School Science 
Program during the coming sum- 
er. 

In announcing the grant, Dr. 
W. G. Erwin, department head, 
stated that this is the first pro- 
gram of its kind in the state and 
is designed to assist 12 high 
schools in Louisiana with the in- 
troduction of Biological Sciences 
Curriculum Study Materials, Green 
Version. Twelve teachers and 24 
high-ability high school students 
will be selected for participation 
in the nine-week program, June 
8 to Aug. 7. 

BSCS, Green Version, consti- 
tutes the environmental approach 
to the study of biology and was 
developed under sponsorship of 
the American Institute of Biologi- 
cal Sciences. Materials, consisting 
of manual and reference mater- 
ials, were developed by hundreds 
of biologists and took two years 
to complete, plus another year for 
revision following a trial program. 



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The BSCS project was supported 
by NSF grants. 

Teachers will be selected from 
schools where BSCS materials have 
not been used. The program in- 
volves a cooperative agreement 
whereby parishes will provide the 
necessary equipment and supplies 
during 1965-66 for teaching BSCS 
biology in the school from which 
a teacher participant is selected. 

Twelve student participants will 
be selected from the same schools 
as teachers with the remaining 12 
to be selected at random. Deadline 
for filing application with Dr. 
Erwin, program director, is March 
15. 

Teacher participants must pos- 
sess the bachelor's degree with a 
minimum of 24 semester hours 
credit in biology, have two or more 
years teaching experience and at 
least 10 years remaining before re- 



tirement, plus the recommenda- 
tion of principals and superinten- 
dents. Each teacher selected for 
participation will be accompanied 
by a high-ability student from his 
school. 

All student participants will 
have completed the ninth grade 
with no grade lower than B arid 
have taken no biology courses. The 
students must have completed one 
course in high school science and 
one in high school mathematics. 

Teacher participants can earn 
eight hours of graduate credit and 
will receive stipends to cover ex- 
penses. Non-commuting teachers 
will receive $75 a week, plus $15 
per week for each dependent up 
to four, and a round trip travel 
allowance of 4 cents per mile. Com- 
muting teachers will receive $60 
per week, the $15 dependent al- 
lowance, and no travel allowance. 



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Friday, March 5, 1965 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 



Insurance Seminar To Be Held By Business Department 



The Northwestern Department 
of Business will sponsor an insur- 
ance seminar, Monday. This in- 
surance seminar will be for agents 
and company field representatives 
from various Shreveport, Alexan- 
dria, and area insurance compan- 
ies, and upperclassmen business 
students at NSC. 

The seminar, first of its kind to 
be held at Northwestern, will be 
conducted in the living room of 
the Home Economics Building on 
the NSC campus. George R. Lewis, 
a former insurance man who join- 
ed the Northwestern faculty in 
September as instructor of busi- 
ness, is seminar leader. 

Four sessions, dealing with what 
is happening in insurance and the 
various trends of the day, are 
scheduled along with two panel 
discussions. 

Conducting the first presenta- 
tion entitled "Trends in Insurance 
Production," will be Garner J. 
Knoepfler of New Orleans, execu- 
tive vice president of Smith and 
Company, a general insurance 
agency. Knoepfler became a mem- 
ber of Chartered Property and 
Casualty Underwriters in 1958 and 
served as president of the Deep 
South Chapter in 1962. He is a past 
president of the Louisiana Rating 
and Fire Prevention Bureau. 

Charles W. Franklin, a member 
of a Louisiana law firm, will con- 
duct the presentation, "What is 
Happening in Insurance Law?". He 
is the former Louisiana claim man- 
ager for the Fund Insurance Com- 
panies and is instructor in insur- 
ance law at Louisiana State Uni- 
versity. He is a member of the Ba- 
ton Rouge and Louisiana Bar As- 
sociations, a member of the Fede- 
ration of Insurance Counsel, and 
the Insurance Section of the Fi- 
delity and Surety Committees of 
the American Bar Association. 

"Self Insurance and Loss Man- 

190 NSC Students 
To Practice Teach 

Dr. Guy Nesom, Dean of the 
School of Education and Dr. Lisso 
Simmons, Head of the Department 
of Education have announced that 
a total of 190 Northwestern seniors 
are student teaching in 10 Louisi- 
ana schools. 

Earning from one to nine hours 
of credit, the students are teach- 
ing in Northwestern Elementary, 
East Natchitoches Elementary, 
George Parks Elementary, North- 
western Junior High, and Natchi- 
toches High School, all in Natchi- 
toches; Forest Hill Elementary, 
Southern Hills Elementary, and 
Summer Grove Elementary in 
Shreveport; Bolton High School 
in Alexandria: and Winnfield 
High School in Winnfield. 

The three Shreveport schools 
were added to the list of possible 
locations of student teaching last 
semester. Students teaching in 
these schools live at home or in 
apartments. 




Biology Department Gets Grant For 
Summer Secondary Training Program 



Thomas R. Files 



Charles W. Franklin 




The Department of Biological 
Sciences at Northwestern has re- 
ceived a $10,250 grant from the 
National Science Foundation in 
order that a Summer Secondary 
Science Training Program can be 
held on Campus. The date set is 
from June 8 through August 7. 

The program is designed for 24 
able students of limited education- 
al opportunities. Through a series 
of lectures and integrated field 
trips, these students will study the 
basic concepts of environmental 
biology. The emphasis of this study 
will be placed on the understanding 
of the scientific method, analysis 
of data, modern methods of field 
study, and the role of research in 
the development of environmental 
biology. 

The sessions of the program will 
be handled in two sections, one on 
aquatic biology, and the other on 
terrestrial biology, and will be de- 
signed to show how organisms fit 
into their environments, how they 
derive their existence from it, how 
they affect it, and how they in- 
teract with other organisms. 

Four trips will be conducted 
weekly to study organisms in the 
field, with two of the weekly trips 
going into the woodland and field 
to study the identification and eco- 



Garner Knoepfler 

agement at Olin Mathieson," the 
third address scheduled, will be 
delivered by Thomas R. Files, 
workmans compensation super- 
visor for the Olin Mathieson Chem- 
ical Corporation plant in West 
Monroe. He received a law degree 
from the University of Tennessee 
in 1926 and engaged in insurance 
defense work for ten years before 
entering the insurance field in the 
claims division. 

A Shreveport insurance man, 
Price M. McCulley, will present the 
fourth address, "Insurance Educa- 
tion." McCulley, a member of the 
Louisiana, Texas, and American 



Price M. McCulley 

Bar Associations is chairman of the 
Southwestern Regional Advisory 
Council, composed of insurance 
company executives and key mem 
bers of the National Association of 
Independent Insurance Adjusters 
which he has served as regional 
vice president. He was also na- 
tional president of the CPCU in 
1961. 

A panel composed of Knoepfler, 
Franklin, Lewis, and Jack Simp 
son, Natchitoches insurance agent, 
will be conducted following the 
first two addresses and a second 
discussion will follow the last two 
presentations. 



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logy of terrestrial vertebrates. At 
least one of these trips will be at 
night to study the activities of 
nocturnal mammals. A four-day 
outing to the Louisiana coast to 
study the ecology of salt water and 
brackfish situations, including the 
identification of the many species 
of birds that abound on the coast, 
is planned midway in the course. 

Participants for the summer pro- 
gram are to be chosen from out- 
standing high scool students who 
will enter the twelfth grade next 
fall. Minimum requirements will 
be the completion of one high- 
school science course and an over- 
all high school grade average of 
"B" or above. Final selection will 
be influenced by the student's 
grade average, especially in science 
and mathematics, achievements on 
any standardized tests that stu- 
dents may have taken, participa- 
tion in science activities, and on 
the recommendations of high 
school principals and science 
teachers. 

Director of the program and one 
of two full time staff members is 
Dr. Hugh C. Land, assistant pro- 
fessor of biology at Northwestern. 
Dwayne N. Kruse, also assistant 
professor of biology will serve as 
the second full time staff member. 



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Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, March 5, 1965 



Northeast Takes Five First Places 
In First Indoor Track Meet Here 



Northeastern placed 5 runners 
in he number one spot to lead 
the way in the first annual Indoor 
Track Meet held at Northwestern 
State College. 

Laurie Elliott of Houston was 
selected as the outstanding per- 
former of the meet by members of 
the press. He is the brother of 
Olympian Herb Elliott. Laurie 
bested Northwestern's Eddie 
Watts in the two mile run as he 
ran a 9:03. 

Roger Morgan of Northeast was 
the leader in the 60-yard high 
hurdles as he ran it in :07.4. A 
teammate, Dalton LeBIanc won 
the 60-yard dash with a time of 
:06.1. Northeast also won the mile 
and the four lap relay. Their pole 
vaulter, John Linta, took first in 
this event with a jump of 14'6". 

Richard Levy of Houston placed 
first in the mile with a time of 
4:21.9. Other Houston teammates 
scoring first places were John 
Morriss in the high jump, 6'4", 
and Watts. 

T u 1 a n e furnished two men 
finishing with first. They were 
Webb Jay in the briad jump, 23-%' 
and Bill Shapiro in the 440. 

The Demons managed one first 
place finish in the person of Dick 
Reding. Reding won the shotput 
with a distance of 50'8%". Jerome 
Beasley, an unattatched runner, 
won the 880. 

College Summary 

Pole vault — 1-2-3-, John Linta, 
Northeast; Gary Johnson, North- 
western State; and Paul Hobgood, 
NE. 4, Corky Corken, Louisiana 
Tech, 14-6. 

Broad jump — 1, Webb Jay, 



Tulane. 2, Monty Ledbetter, NSC. 
3, Roger Mann, NE. 4, Mike Arsu- 
age, Tuiane. 23-%. 

60 high hurdles— 1, Mann, NE. 
2, Zuyler Thompson, Houston. 3, 
Fred Vogel, NE. 4, John Morris, 
Houston. :07.4 

60 yard dash — 1 Dalton LeBIanc, 
NE. 2, Ronnie Fountain.NE. 3, 
Craig Henry, McNeese. 4, Ledbet- 
ter, NSC. :06.1. 

Four lap relay — 1, NE (LeBIanc, 
Tabor, Vogel, Fountain) 2, Hous- 
ton. 3, SLC. 4, Stephen F. Austin. 
1:12.8. 

Mile — 1, Richard Levy, Houston. 

2, Howard Rayan, Houston. 3, 
Bill White, NE. 4, Robert Harvi- 
son, NE. 4:21.9. 

440—1, Bill Shapiro, Tulane. 2, 
Tony Pickett, unattached. 3, Willis 
Delhomme, NE. 4, Amos Grodji- 
movski, NSC. :50.3. 

880 — 1, Jerome Beasley, un- 
attached. 2, Bobby Bells, Houston. 

3, Robert Keesler, NE. 4, David 
Crais, Tulane. 1:56.8. 

Two-mile — l.Laurie Elliot, Hous- 
ton. 2, Eddie Watts, NSC. 3, Larry 
Fuselier, unatteched. 4, Norman 
Cooper, Houston. 9:03. 

Mile relay — 1, NE(LeBlance, 
Averitt, Vogel, Fountain). 2, 
Houston. 3, La. Tech. 4, Tulane. 
3:25.6. 

High jump — 1, John Morriss, 
Houston. 2, Jack McDougal, NE. 
3-4, Gary Johnson, NSC, and Frank 
Kelly. 6-4. 

Shot put— 1, Dick Reding, NSC. 
2, Mike Sheppard, unattached. 3, 
Joe Pecarrere, SLC. 4, Roy Strain, 
SLC. 50-8%. 



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Sigma Taus Start Semester Off With Spring Rush Party 



Sigma Tau got the new semester 
off to a fine start with its Spring 
Rush Party. It was held at our 
"House on the Hill" and 17 rush- 
ees attended. This was a fine turn- 
out for Spring Rush and Sigma 
Tau looks forward to extending 
bids. A picture and the names of 
the new pledges will appear in 
next week's Current Sauce. 

Members and pledges are look- 
ing forward to the Annual Spring 
Bachelor Party to ge held this 
week. The Bachelor Party is a 
bi-annual event with one held in 
the fall and one in the spring. 
It always proves to be a great 
success and is enjoyed by all. 

The pledge class held a car wash 
this past Saturday and were quite 
pleased with the success they had. 



CANE THEATRE 



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Friday-Saturday 



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Wednesday-Thursday 



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Another will be held this Saturday 
and the pledges hope to do even 
better. 

Five Sigma Tau pledges went 
to Shreveport this weekend to 
donate blood in behalf of Mrs. 
Julia Spaulding who is a close 
frind of faculty advisor J. H. 
Johnson. Boys making this trip 
were Ken Touchet, Bob Pina, Rick 
Evans, Orville Lee Evans, and 
Lionel Bourg. 

Both Sigma Tau intramural 
basketball teams are doing well 
and both hold a 1-1 record at pre- 
sent. 

The actives enjoyed a visit from 
Mr. Graham of the speech dept. to 
their meeting Monday night. His 
interesting talk was well received 
by everyone. 

Sigma Tau was proud to be 
chosen as ushers for the assembly 
Wednesday featuring Ambassador 
Sergio Rojas. 

Sigma Tau wishes to extend con- 
gratulations to Brother Mike Mc- 
Daniels on his recent marriage to 
Miss Ann Busenbarrick. Also to 
pledge Brother Jim Macmahon on 
his recent marriage. 

Outstanding member of the 
week is Brother Evan Kent Stein- 
hauser of Shreveport. Evan is a 



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John Forsythe 

KITTEN WITH A WHIP' 



Saturday 
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Sun. Mon.-Tues 



Jerry Lewis 
As 

'THE DISORDERLY 
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Color 



4-1 accounting major and has ser- 
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He served as treasurer for two 
years before being replaced by 
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WEDNESDAY "BUCK NITE' 



June Allyson 
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VOL. LI— No. 19 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Friday, March 12, 1965 



Awards Presented At AWS Banquet 



The ninth annual Association 
Women Student's Honors Banquet 
was held at Northwestern Thurs- 
day at 8 p.m. The banquet theme 
was "Jewels in Her Crown" in re- 
cognition and tribute to those stu- 
dents who had achieved academic 
excellence. 

The tables were decorated with 
crowns encrusted with jewels. Min- 
iature satin and velvet pillows 
marked the places for the guests. 
Above the head table was a large 
poster depicting a jeweled crown 
with the inscription "Jewels in Her 
Crown." "Miss Magnolia," the doll 
symbol for the AWS, was dressed 
in a white satin gown with a pur- 
ple velvet cape. 

The program was presided over 
by Miss Irby McCann, the out-going 
president. The invocation was 
given by Miss Rebecca Alphin, the 
IWAS Representative. Miss Bar- 
bara Wallace, the president-elect 
for 1965-66, introduced the guests. 

Presentation of awards and hon- 
ors to women students and several 
campus organizations climaxed the 
evening. 

The Purple Jacket organization 
gives an award annually to a soph- 
omore woman student for scholar- 
ship, leadership and character. Miss 
Addie Huckabay, sponsor of the 
Purple Jackets, presented the 
award to Barbara Wallace. 

Miss Rae Belle Warner, presi- 
dent of the Panhellenic Council, 
gave the Panhellenic Freshman 
Award to the sophomore woman 
who had attained the highest scho- 
lastic average during her freshman 
year. This award went to Pamela 
Pepperman. Her average was 
3.9705. 

Sterling silver candle holders 
were presented to the sorority hav- 
ing the highest academic average 
and the sorority receiving this 
award was Sigma Sigma Sigma. 

All other awards were presented 
by Mrs. Lucille M. Hendrick, dean 
of women and sponsor of the AWS. 
They were AWS Freshman Award, 
Betty Doiron; AWS Undergraduate 
Award, Jackie Caksie; AWS Senior 
Award, Lucy Hart; and Dean of 
Women's Awards, Linda Reese and 
Linda Robichaux. 

Residence Hall Awards were pre- 
sented to the dormitories having 
the highest average for the fall 
semester. They were Louisiana 
Hall, 2.8754, South Natchitoches, 
2.5353, and Audubon, 2.3151. 

Officer keys were presented to 



Student Magazine 
Planned For May 

Plans for a student magazine to 
be published at Northwestern in 
May were announced by the Crea- 
tive Writers Club this week. 

The magazine, to be called etc., 
will contain short-stories, poems, 
and art work by NSC students. Em- 
phasis will be placed on entertain- 
ing original writing. 

All currently enrolled students 
are eligible to submit manuscripts 
and art work for consideration. 
Those interested should use the 
following form: type all copy, 
double spaced. On one side of the 
page, no carbons please. Mail all 
manuscripts to P.O. Box 384, NSC. 
Keep a copy as the original will 
not be returned until after publi- 
cation. Dead line for submitting 
material is April 17. 



GAME CANCELLED 

The intrasquad football game 
that was originally scheduled for 
today has been postponed due to 
inclement weather, according to 
Coach Jack Clayton. 

Clayton informed the "Sauce" 
this morning that the game has 
been rescheduled for 3:30 Mon- 
day afternoon. 



Irby McCann, Barbara Wallace, Pa- 
tricia Simon, Betty Sue DeWitt, Ca- 
rolyn Brewer, Sandra Byrd, Mary 
Pat Hayden, Carol Stone, and 
Catherine Wall. 

The Judiciary Board is made up 
of three upperclassmen. Appointed 
to serve for next year are Amy 
Maxwell, senior; Patsy Watkins, 
junior; and Robin Butler, sopho- 
more. 

Sophomore Counselors for 1965- 
66 are: 

Agnes Morris-Kay Angele, Ron- 
nie Buffington, Barbara Cole, Peg- 
gy Deggs, Leola Johnson, Betty 
Jowers, and Martha Molnaird. 

Audubon Hall-Rose Berlin, Patti 
Castille, In